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Found 1,215 results

  1. I've always loved living fossils, especially the fish. They are relics of an age long lost, offering us a glimpse of an incredible prehistoric world. Some are enigmas that survived countless extinction events since the Devonian. Others are majestic predators that swam alongside the dinosaurs. Let me present my collection of living fossil fishes from the Mesozoic and before. I will begin with one of the most famous of all - the coelacanth Coelacanth Species: Whiteia woodwardi Age: 252.3 - 251.3 mya | early Triassic Formation: Diego Basin; Middle Sakamena Formation Locality: Ambilobe, Madagascar First appearance: Eoachtinistia foreyi was found 360 million years ago in Australia Paddlefish Species: Protopsephurus liui Age: 125.5 - 112.5 mya | early Cretaceous Formation: Yixian Formation Locality: Lingyuan City, Liaoning First appearance: This is the oldest known species Sturgeon Species: Peipiaosteus fengningensis Age: 125.5 - 120 mya | early Cretaceous Formation: Jehol Biota Locality: Chifeng, Nei Mongol First appearance: Multiple species e.g. Yanosteus longidorsalis found since 125 million years ago in China Pipefish Species: Hipposygnathus sp. Age: 28.1 - 13.8 mya | Oliogocene - Miocene Formation: Monterey Formation Locality: Santa Ynez Valley, California, USA First appearance: Solenostomidae species were found 55.8 million years ago in Italy Note: Although most of this collection only includes fishes that existed since the Mesozoic or later, I made an exception for the pipefish as their order, syngnathiform, existed since the late Cretaceous
  2. Help with fossil fish

    Hiya everyone just got this fossil fish a help with ID would be great thanks
  3. Another fish? Tooth? ID question

    Apologies but one last fish tooth question from my Saturday hunt in Big Brook. What is it. Is it even A fish tooth? Just over 1/2 inch long. Thank you
  4. Green River Fish rust?

    I have prepped this fish a year ago with a needle,looking back at it with a magnifier i see some weird powder on parts of the head only.Is it gonna turn into powder and rust away,or had i carelessly prepped it to this state?
  5. Greetings all. I had forgotten about this piece of shale that I split while at Jalama a couple of weeks back. To my eye it looks like either a land insect, or possible a sea bug, like a shrimp. Then again, it may be nothing. But just in case it's just to the right side of almost nothing, I figured I'd post an image or two. Thanks for any input provided. Cheers. Rats, I forgot the size reference/index. Length is ~15mm. Exploding fish reference thread. Monterey formation in Santa Barbara, CA, USA.
  6. Gar fish scale

    From the album Fossil Collection

  7. Last month my dad and I took a four-day weekend trip to Western New York to visit some new fossil sites and to collect in the famous Beecher's Trilobite Beds. We had only once before been out to Western New York to collect fossils - a visit to Penn Dixie Fossil Park - so this time around we wanted to try out some different places that we had never collected in before. The trip was a lot of fun and I enjoyed putting my research skills to work in finding new places to visit. I greatly expanded my collection of Silurian and Devonian fossils and found quite a few things on my fossil bucket list. I am excited to hopefully make another trip out there soon and fortunately still have my list of potential stops to make. Thursday On Thursday we woke early and made the 6.5 hour drive towards Western New York. In preparing for the trip I spoke with @fossilcrazy who was kind enough to invite my dad and me to collect from some of the spoils piles on his property from the various fossil collecting trips he has made. I was really excited to explore his pile of Linton Coal as I have very few fish in my collection and even fewer Pennsylvanian marine fossils - one of the consequences of living near Eastern Pennsylvania is that you end up visiting a lot of Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation plant sites. @fossilcrazy is an amazing fossil collector and an even more incredible member of the fossil collecting community. I cannot say enough about his generosity and hospitality. We were all hoping that my dad and I could find an amphibian or complete fish fossil, but no luck. We found a few isolated Orthacanthus teeth and head spines and some isolated coelacanth scales and bones. Fortunately @fossilcrazy kindly gifted me some representative pieces to add to my collection. These fossils are from the Middle Pennsylvanian Upper Freeport Coal from Linton, Ohio. I highly recommend checking out some of the posts @fossilcrazy has made about his finds from the Linton Coal. They are amazing! Rhabdoderma elegans Here are some close-ups of this beautiful coelacanth head and tail Haplolepis sp. Orthocanthus compressus Teeth and Head Spine Conchostracans Death Plate After visiting with @fossilcrazy we made our way into Buffalo to visit Frank Lloyd Wright's Martin House. My dad is an architect and he really wanted to see the newly restored interior of the house. It is really a quite stunning home.
  8. Carboniferous fish tooth?

    I found this in a phosphatic nodule from the Mecca Quarry Shale (Middle Pennsylvanian) of Illinois. It's pretty jumbled, perhaps as a result of digestion. My first reaction was that this is the base of a fish tooth, but I am not positive. Any thoughts?
  9. True or fake? And what species is it? I have this rare fish from the US Eocene. It has color and a lacquer applied. The rock is authentic and I have passed a flame over the fish and it does not melt, it is not resin. But I still have doubts.
  10. Shark Teeth and Misc.

    Figured I might sift through some shark teeth and misc. aquatic creature fossils I have stored in a couple boxes and post them here and perhaps learn a bit more about them from more knowledgeable members. These aren't arranged in any order, unfortunately, as I really don't know much about sharks and am still learning, so if anything stands out, please let me know! I must also apologize for the poor photo quality-I don't have any fancy set ups and this is just a quick perusal of what I have and throw it up here on the forum kinda night, haha. Scale is in mm/cm; I have listed the names and countries for each specimen, but where I have typed labels in the photos, more details can be read by the photo to save me some typing. Otherwise, details are typed out. Hope y'all enjoy! In the Khouribga, Morocco display (45-70 myo): -Carcharias tingitana -Myliobatis dixoni -Squalicorax pristodontus -Odontaspis winkleri -Cretolamna biauriculata -Onchosaurus vertebrae -Odontaspis substriata -Mosasurus -Otodus obliquus -Carcharias whiter -Rhombodus meridionalis -Pristis microdons -Striatolamna gasfana -Paleophis maghrebianus -Odontaspis vincenti -Enchodus libycus -Carcharias atlantica -Myliobatis raouxi -Squalicorax kaupi -Phylodus tolyapictus -Carcharias africana Orthacanthus sp. fin spine from the Permian of Waurika, Oklahoma: Anodontacanthus sp. spine from the Permian of Waurika, Oklahoma: Myliobatis sp. stingray tail spine from the Pliocene of Whalers Bluff Fm., near Portland, Victoria, Australia: Myliobatis sp. Stingray tooth from the late Miocene, Port Campbell Limestone, Portland, Victoria, Australia: Carcharochles chubutensis, Miocene of Peru: Lamna nasus, Belgium: Squalus minor, France: Serratolamna serrata, Belgium: Striatolamia macrota, Antarctica: Protosphyraena sp., Australia: Helodus rankinei, Scotland: Isistius triangulus, Early Miocene, Upper Meeresmolasse, Owingen, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany: Helodus sp., Early Carboniferous, Blackhall Limestone, Skateraw, East Lothian, Scotland: Otodus obliquus, Middle Eocene, Romania: Xenacanthus sp. x2, Scotland: Keasius parvus basking shark gill raker, Czechoslovakia: Isistius triangulus, Early Miocene, Upper Meeresmolasse, Hollsteig, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany: Petalodus acuminatus, Scotland: Helodus sp. Dorsal fin spine, Scotland: Cetorhinus maximus gill rakers, Miocene-Pliocene, Hoevenen, Antwerp area, Belgium: Will continue in next post...
  11. I just made a video which includes a video at the end of my Rarest Fossil find! It's a beautiful fish which are super rare here. Hopefully you enjoy the video if you choose to watch it
  12. Fish Fossil Identification

    Can anyone please help identify this fish fossil? Thanks!
  13. Hello all, I have been long searching for an exceptionally high/museum quality aspiration example from Green River. I recently have found myself with the opportunity to acquire this specimen. I've been told that there is a small amount of restoration on the tail of the Priscacara but I don't know exactly how much/what it entails yet. I'd ideally prefer a specimen with 0% restoration but I don't know how realistic that is. For scale, the diplo is 18" long, I'm told. It's obviously pretty cool that this is a Priscacara aspiration as my understanding is that this is pretty uncommon. I'd be very curious to hear your feedback on this piece in general, your thoughts on the restoration, and to hear your suggestions on whether or not this is the "right" piece to add to my collection (last part is a personal decision, I know...). I don't mind waiting to find the perfect piece... but I also don't know how realistic it is to find one much better as this one seems pretty nice to my eye. I wish the tail were poking out a bit farther but hey I guess I give the diplo credit for getting it that far down before expiring... Really appreciate your thoughts.
  14. Shark Tooth for ID

    Hello! Help please to identify this tooth. Size: 3,5- 4 mm. Age: Cretaceous-Paleogene. Western Ukraine. Thanks in advance.
  15. Via Sci-News: Osteostraci, the jawless sister group to all jawed vertebrates, had adaptations for passive control of water flow around the body, according to new research led by the University of Bristol. http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/ecologically-diversified-osteostraci-08916.html Full original paper-no paywall: Computational Fluid Dynamics Suggests Ecological Diversification among Stem-Gnathostomes https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(20)31362-2 Generalized translation: Armored fish developed streamlining and passivecontrol surfaces adapted for efficiency while swimming, as in form over function. Also the big armored heads likely did not have much impact on the later development of jaws and related structures. Or, even simpler, these guys were really efficient at moving through the water even with big, heavy heads and the more modern mouth that evolved later did not necessarily result in greater numbers of different shapes among species.
  16. So Many Minis!

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    This assemblage came from one cup (about 340 ml) of micro matrix from Aurora Fossil Museum. Oddly, they are generally much larger than most of what I found in the rest of the matrix. They are all from either the Pliocene or Pleistocene. See album description.
  17. Porgy Fish Tooth

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Family Sparidae Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina
  18. Pinfish Tooth

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Lagodon rhomboides about 3 mm long Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina
  19. Hello! this is one of my weirdest things I have found at this location, I believe it might be a fragment from a fin spine? A piece from an Echinoid? Something else? I would love to know what it is and what species this came from! Some information on the area: Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Most likely from a member of the Iola Limestone What makes this one of the most bizarre fossils I have found is the circular pattern on the fossil itself, as I have not seen anything like this in the area before. backside Pictures in their natural file size: https://imgur.com/a/qUWY0gB
  20. Mystery bone from the Boulonnais

    Hi all, Back once more with a find from the Boulonnais. This time found between Boulogne-sur-Mer and Wimereux. The geology there is Kimmeridgian marine deposit, and the fossil presented here derives from a block of yellow sandstone with marine inclusions. It was embedded in an enclosure of soft, porous sand, which I hadn't quite expected and is the reason it's currently in the state it is in. I managed to find a rock with a pycnodont fish tooth and some similarly coloured (i.e. white) bone fragments in the area, in comparable yet harder sandstone. So my first impression was some kind of fish bone. However, I'm having a hard time figuring out what kind of fish bone, seeing as my piece is flat on one side and appears to have a bit of a twist (or may be a depression where another bone would have gone) on another. As such, the flat side made me think of a jaw bone, of a marine reptile in particular. Yet, the bone seems to extend away from it's flat side, which wouldn't quite fit what one would expect of a jaw bone. My third guess, based on the slight depression on one side of the bone and the rounded end at one of the short sides (which kind of reminds me of the epiphysis of a long bone), was some kind of long bone - lower arm or lower leg, where you'll typically find two bones lying closely together - but I'm not sure of this either. Moreover, this would be the feature of a terrestrial animal, not a marine one - with the exception of crocodiles (which lower extremity bones, however, are not closely spaced together, so wouldn't match my hypothesis). I realise the bone is fragmentary and not even in the best of states. But I hope enough has been preserved to determine something of it's origin, if even just in terms of marine vs. terrestrial, reptile vs. fish or mammal, etc. Dimensions: 86.5mm/3.40" long, 42.6mm/1.67" wide, and 23.5mm/0.92" tall Thanks in advance for your help! Don't hesitate to ask for additional details.
  21. Location: Missouri Timer period: Paleozoic (Might be Pennsylvanian) Formation: N/A Hello! My friend recently gifted to me a few fossils and he brought to me an interesting tooth/crushing plate and asked if I was familiar with it, and unfortunately I was not! He mentioned what he thought it could belong to, but I am unable to recall what species. Some information I was told was that his mother actually found his specimen at a location a few years ago and I was unable to get a picture of the location or check it out due to a busy schedule! My friend's specimen (he took home): Around 5-6 cm The one he gifted me: (backside) Roughly 2.5cm long ( The plate fossil itself) Images in their natural size (not compressed): https://imgur.com/a/ZWA47Mf
  22. Hello! I found these beautiful scales inside a calcium phosphate nodule from Muncie Creek Shale. I believe this fish regurgitation might have some identifiable scales and I would love to know if anyone can nail down an exact species! Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale The center scale is roughly 9mm long! Concretion with Size reference other half of the concretion other half rotated More images and in their natural size (Not compressed) https://imgur.com/a/pWKw9Vk
  23. Hello! I was recently opening my Muncie Creek Shale nodules and this beautiful collection of scales and bone fragments came out! I believe it is fish regurgitation. Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale the middle scale is roughly 9mm long! other half of the concretion Outer view of the Concretion and size reference Images in their natural size (not compressed) https://imgur.com/a/pWKw9Vk
  24. I still have about 30 more to finish preparing, but so far, here are the best two I have prepped from my 2019 Green River run:
  25. Cretaceous Fish Fin

    I found this fragment of a fish fin during my last trip to the North Sulphur River. The ribbed structure looked so much like a piece of tile that I almost walked past it at first! I've been looking at some of the photos in the Dallas Paleo Society's book on the NSR since I've been back, and the closest match I can find are the pectoral fins of Protosphyraena tenius. The only other thing I can think of is maybe part of the tail fin of a Xiphactinus audax? If anyone has any suggestions, they'd be much appreciated!
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