Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Florissant'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 13 results

  1. This was purchased in Colorado, about an hour away from Florissant which is known for insect fossils. It's about 10 mm long. What do you guys think? Real, fake, a mix of both? Thanks!
  2. until
    First Presentation: Our first speaker will be Carl Fechko. His topic will be: "The fossils of the Florissant Fossil Beds". The Florissant formation is world famous for its abundance of well preserved insects and plants. Carl's presentation will focus upon the knowledge that he gained from a visit to The Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. He will also share his experience collecting fossils at the Florissant Fossil Quarry. Second Presentation: Donna Cole and Craig Tipton will combine their efforts in a talk entitled: "A Trip to Wyoming, July/August, 2018". It will cover the highlights of their journey to Wyoming, their visit to the American Fossil Quarry near Kemmerer, and then their trip to the Eden Valley - Blue Forrest Fossil Wood site northeast of Kemmerer. Third Presentation: Our third speaker will be Carl Fechko. His topic will be: "A visit to the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Canada". For this talk, Carl will share what he experienced in a "behind the scenes" tour at the ROM along with a description of some of the most interesting fossils and exhibits at the ROM. Collector's Corner: Bring Your favorite Insect and Bug Fossils for showing others and sharing information.
  3. Florissant spider id ?

    All, My son found this orb-weaver spider at the Florissant Fossil Quarry in Colorado last month. It's about 1.5" (4cm) between the tips of the longest legs. There are short thorns on the abdomen, and possibly on the bases of the legs as well. Overall, it's very much like the golden orb-weavers whose webs I have the occasional misfortune of walking into in my garden. Can anybody tell me what genus, or perhaps even species this may be?
  4. This was found near Douglas Pass In Colorado. The imprint is just under 3 inches point to point. I am having a hard time figuring this one out. The shale is from the same formation as Florissant Colorado from what I understand,
  5. The Florissant Fossil Quarry in Florissant, Colorado, has been on my list of places to visit. It is just outside the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument west of Colorado Springs. As much as I would have liked to go dig at the quarry, I knew that wouldn’t happen this year. So I decided to order some shale from the quarry and have it shipped to me. Even at $7.50 per pound plus shipping it was less expensive to buy the shale than to spend a week on the road getting there and back from California. After emailing Nancy Anderson at the quarry to work out the details, I mailed off my check for 20 pounds of shale and received two boxes by priority mail about a week later. I have only just started going through it but I thought I would give you this early update. The quarry is known for its plant and insect fossils, with an occasional fish or bird. These fossils come from the Eocene epoch, about 34 million years ago. The quarry’s website doesn’t go into stratigraphy but according to the National Monument website the fossils in the quarry come from the Lower Shale Unit of the Florissant Formation, which does not appear in the park itself. First thing I did was weigh the boxes and as expected, I got what I ordered plus maybe a little bit more. Here is what one of the boxes looks like when opened. Only a small portion of the shale is spread out on the blue tarp, there is much more still in the bag. Here’s the instruction sheet that came in the box. They recommend preserving it with a mix of 1 part Elmer’s glue to 2 parts water, then coating with clear Krylon. The shale is easily fractured so I definitely want to protect it, but if anyone has better recommendations, let me know. Here’s a typical piece. The thin bands of shale are separated by an occasional layer of what one reference calls tufaceous siltstone. There are no identifiable fossils in the siltstone, they are all in the thin layers of shale. I decided to throw together a fixture to help hold the shale while I was splitting it. I just took a few boards I had laying around and using clamps and screws, created a corner against which I could set the rock in place. I have a thin spring steel chisel I originally bought to split Green River fish that works pretty well for the first round of splits. Close-up of fixture. I soon realized I need to use a microscope and needle probes to really find things and clean them up. Here is my microscope setup. A lot of the shale has unidentifiable bits and pieces of organic material, but I’ve already started discovering a few interesting things. Here are a couple of partial leaf fossils. Here is another well-defined leaf that looks something like a willow. Here’s the most interesting thing I’ve found so far. It looks like some sort of winged insect. It is pretty small and I would have never discovered it without the microscope and needle probes. Close-up of head. Note the two compound eyes. I’ve only been through a couple of pounds of rock, still plenty more to go. I will keep you posted if I find anything interesting.
  6. The Florissant Fossil Quarry in Colorado is near the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, famous for Eocene plant and insect fossils. You can dig for fossils at the Quarry and they will also ship shale to you to hunt on your own. I’m probably not going to be able get out there any time soon so I was thinking about maybe having them ship some shale to me. But before I spend $7.50 per pound plus shipping for maybe 20 pounds of shale, I thought I should check to see if anyone has experience doing this. I know it sounds expensive but it is cheaper than taking a trip out there. Any thoughts?
  7. Florissant something

    Always go through the chips left on the table. Any idea what I almost missed ?
  8. Cedar ?

    Another Florissant find. This looks a bit like cedar cones to me. What would the polka dotted thing be though ?
  9. Wasp ?

    Another Florissant insect.
  10. Robber fly ?

    Back from vacation with this find from Florissant. It seems a possible match for the one on display at the monument.
  11. My wife and I are headed to a wedding in Denver this weekend. I know its short notice but any locals have any suggestions or hot spots for some petrified wood or some fossils? I am already planning a trip to Florissant for the pay dig shale splitting for a few hours. And I have found a lot of possible petrified wood spots but don't know how much time I have to be scouting uncharted territories. And of course I am not going to say no to any good fossil spots either. I do have tumblers and rock saws so the petrified wood is really on my radar. I do have the Rockhounding Colorado book too but thought I would reach out to the locals on this one. Thanks! Chris
  12. This week I am visiting family in Colorado. A few days ago I took a lovely trip to Florissant Fossil Beds. They had lots of interesting stuff at the visitor center. I found a privately owned quarry nearby in which they let people break open shale and search for fossils for a small fee. I didn't find much, but it was very fun! The pics shown are a leaf and a small insect. The wings were unfortunately chipped off when I found it. I also visited Dinosaur Ridge nearby and bought an Elasmosaurus tooth from the shop. I then saw the fossils displayed at the School of Mines geology museum. Very cool.
  13. Halloween Spider!

    Found this guy last night splitting some shale I had laying around. Found on a piece about the size of a quarter!
×