Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Fossil Hunting'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 78 results

  1. Hi all, So, as some of you already know, my trip to Florida is coming closer and closer I am indeed really looking forward to it! Well, I have some questions about the fossils there. Firstly, for the seashells found there (bivalves and gastropods), I know that many are fossil (mainly Miocene to Pleistocene). Well, I was wondering if perhaps there were any tricks or techniques to recognize fossil ones from modern ones. For example, for the Holland coasts bivalves, the fossil ones are usually thicker, dull, white/light grey in color, and they don't let any (or very little) light shine through. Well, I was wondering if there were similar tricks for the Florida seashells to find out whether a shell is fossil or not. Please do let me know how you do it! Oh, and one other quick question: are ALL the shells NOT found on the beach fossils? I know that in the Netherlands this is not the case (you can find shells several kilometers inland that are modern; they have been brought here by floods and storms), but was wondering if this was maybe different for Florida. And lastly, a quick question about the fossiling permits. Do I need to sign up for one (I will be collecting both invertebrate and vertebrate fossils, like shark teeth and dugong bones)? If yes, is one permit enough for the family, or does everyone need to apply for one individually? And how do I get them? So, recap: What are tricks/techniques for recognizing fossil seashells from modern ones? Are all the inland seashells fossilized? Do I need fossil hunting permits? Also, if there are any special laws that you think I should be aware of let me know too. Thanks in advance for your answers! Best regards, Max PS: just realized, this is actually more suitable for the Fossil Hunts thread... @Fossildude19 or another moderator, can you please move it? Thanks
  2. Halloween is coming up soon so lets share our fossil related horror stories! They can range from Preparation accidents, missed opportunities, breaking specimens, close encounters with a dangerous animal hunting, near death experiences, or even receiving a fossil from an old haunted collection, pretty much anything a hunter and collector would find horrifying. One of my personal fossil horror stories involves a a terrifying bump in the night! I had recent found and started a to use a new plastic shelf I found to store my finds from a recent new spot. I started to notice a few days in the shelf was already nearly filled to capacity, so I decided I would add no more after today's load. Sometime after mid-night I heard a sudden loud bang and woke up to the plastic shelf tipping over forward, one of the support wheels had poped out! Luckily the shock awakened my superhuman reflexes of seeing my fossils in danger so I leapt up and was able to save the shelf from crashing down. I was shaken but since then stabilized the shelf, it was truly horrifying to see that moment when my fossils could've been severely damaged or destroyed
  3. Hello! It's been a loooong time guys! I'd like to introduce some Korean trilobites to you and share some of my experience in fossil hunting in Korea(South). I went to Gurang-ri[GuRang-ri], Mungyeong[MunGyeong], Northern Gyeongsang-do[GyeongSang-do] on June, 23th, 2017 for hunting trilobites. (By the way at this time, I went there by in my brother's car, finally! I practiced a bit after I had gotten the driver's license. Maybe I'll go to Jiggunsan formation on December in brother's car, again! *:D*) Anyway, I found the location and some information from a dissertation, which was posted by a high school teacher(it was written in Korean. Maybe if you can speak Korean, then I can share it :)) The teacher found 2 kinds of specimens from different formations. One is Gurang-ri[GuRangRi] formation and the other one is Hanae-ri[HaNeRi] formation. One is "Kootenia amanoi Kobayashi, 1961" and the other one is "Redlichia nobilis Walcott, 1905". Actually, I was going to go to Jiggunsan formation 'cause that site's fossil output is better than Gurangri formation. You know, I had hit the rocks for about 2 and a half in the strong sun(at that time, the temperature was around 95°F(35°C)) and I found just 7 specimens. On the other hand, I found about 60 specimens in 2 and half hours in Jiggunsan formation. I grabbed the steering wheel with excirtement The quote from Robert Stevenson crossed my mind at that time: "To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive". Before going to the fossil site, it was really excited. But I thought that I would trembke with excitement if when I could meet some trilobites so much so that when I encountered faint galaxies or stars through the telescope. (Highway rest stop. The big words(충주휴게소) on signboard means Chungju[ChungJu] rest stop.) When I got to this rest stop, I reminded that I forgot to take mosquito repellrant. So I bought a new one and had blunch from near here. After arriving at the fossil site, I couldn't find the actual formation. With perplexed feeling, I just knocked this seems similar sedimentary rocks which depicted as red-purple colored layers. *Gurang-ri[GuRang-ri] formation And I found something strange structure. I thought that it was some strange metamorphic structure or bivalve fossil. However, after took a closer look, I felt something is strange and finally I realized that it was trilobites' head shield! The images are Redlichia nobilis Walcott, 1905 I took these pictures when I was in my country. So, I couldn't change the coin to other countries' coin or ruler. Its size is almost 1" or 25 Canadian cents. Redlichia's cranidium. Thorax part. Another cranidium preserved as cast(positive). This one is mold part of the above image. One part of thorax. Not that good preserved but still can see some glabella. Cranidium and librigena(free cheek) Librigena(free cheek) and strange fossil cast part. Mold part. Librigena(free cheek). Strange fossil. I don't know what it is. Thank you for reading this long post! Next time, I'll update fossil hunting at Humber river, Toronto, Ontario. And Brechin quarry and Bowmanville quarry. Thankfully, Joe from Michigan will take me to there! I REALLY appreciate it!
  4. Hurricane Irma Great White

    I believe this beauty is a great white but need some help on a specific ID from the experts! I sure was happy to find it!
  5. So today Ive went down to the bay that I was planning to find fossils in for awhile, only to come back empty handed (I couldnt reach any of the shale quarries and just decided that its layers are too flat to house fossils anyways). Being a Palos Verdean, There are small pockets of quarries which are generaly unprotected by preserves (usually alongside roads, sometimes beaches). Palos Verdes has a rich history of Miocene-Quarternary fossils, but much of the fossiliferous zones are protected by preserves. Because I cant really go far just to find fossils, I can only hunt in the small pockets I can find. Ive studied some geological maps and do know where the according-to-theory fossiliferous shale are, I just dont know how exactly to find fossils without destroying the place and getting under a legal flat. Are there any tips and tricks for this kind of fossiling?
  6. Hello all! Hope your having a great weekend!!! My girlfriend and I will be in Madison, Indiana around 7:30 am. We will be checking out the old railroad bath and maybe places along the river. If anyone in the area knows any places I can check out please let me know!!
  7. Fossils We Want To Find.

    Fossils We Want To Find. There’s a list of fossils I’d really like you to go out and find. Good luck. By Darren Naish, Scientific American Blog, July 21, 2017 https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/fossils-we-want-to-find Yours, Paul H.
  8. What’s beneath the black water? Divers reveal the secrets of the Waccamaw River. by Audrey Hudson, Sun News, Myrtle Beach, August 1, 2017 http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/news/local/article164796732.html Yours, Paul H.
  9. Fossil Hunting - Florida

    Hi all, For us Europeans, Florida is a very exotic place. This may not be your view though, especially if you are from there (as many members here are). Anyways, I am really excited, because this winter (around x-mas) I will be going with my family to Orlando! (the hotel is less exciting: it's the Disney World one ). Anyways, we have a few days to go fossil hunting in one of the most fossiliferous regions in the world. We have already booked a trip with Fossil Voyages, owned by our very forum admin @Cris and his friend Kyle, which I'm sure will be a very exciting moment. But we have still a few extra days free for fossil hunting. We will surely go to the famous Peace River at some point, but having a few extra good hunting locations will be good. Though these may be, in your eyes, very basic/usual hunting locations, I am looking for your favorite hunting spots in Florida. So please jot down in the replies any good locations, and tips you have about them! Any info is welcome (Not too far from Orlando though, we don't want to spend the day in the car). Also, meeting up with some of you, and maybe even hunting with them, would be great too!!! I will, obviously, make some nice reports of the hunts afterwards. Thanks in advance, Max
  10. non-nodule fossils from Mazon area

    I went to the Mazonia South Unit last week for my second ever fossil hunting trip in as many weeks. (I may be developing a problem). On my first trip I didn't find many nodules so I wanted to go back and try hunting in a different area. However I did find what I believe to be fossils in limestone and some pyrite (as identified in another submission-Thanks!). I will post the photo of the limestone sample in another submission as the pictures are too large. The fossil I am most curious about is pictured below. I credit my dog with finding this one as she led me to the place it was laying under an evergreen tree. The first photo shows the side with the fossil while the second photo shows the opposite side. It seems to have a stain on it that follows the same shape of the fossil. I don't know if that is a coincidence or relevant to the id. I'm assuming this is limestone solely based on its color, I could very well be wrong.
  11. Fossil hunters risk becoming extinct as they look for finds among 2,000 tons of rock that fell from unstable 150ft Broadchurch cliffs, Daily Mail http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4739036/Fossil-hunters-risk-extinct-looking-finds.html Coastguard sent to stop families with young children searching for fossils in rockfall debris Dorset echo, July 27, 2017 http://www.dorsetecho.co.uk/news/15437307.Coastguard_sent_to_stop_families_with_young_children_searching_for_fossils_in_rockfall_debris/ Yours, Paul H.
  12. Fossil Site Info

    Hello! So I just got my hands on an old (34-year old) fossil guide for Pennsylvania. I found a couple nearby and somewhat promising fossil sites, but I don't know if their accessible nowadays. Does anybody know the status of these sites: -Blue Mountain roadcut on PA 641 in Roxbury, Franklin County -The Lesh Borrow Pit a mile southwest of Newport, Perry County I'm also curious if more fossil sites have popped up around sputh central PA since the 80's, so any info on that would be much appreciated. Thanks
  13. Fossil Hunting Suggestions

    My father and I are planning on taking a trip fossil hunting this summer, we can't seem to find anywhere that really seems worth driving to. (Everything around us is basically Devonian.) We were looking for something different: Mosasaur, Arthropods (Cambrian preferred), Holocene, etc. My dad loves actual bones and I love arthropods from Cambrian. We came to a consensus and are looking for anything marine in the Mid-West. But we will take any suggestions into consideration! (We are new-ish to fossil hunting and are willing to go anywhere and do anything.
  14. Summerville SC

    Well, im in SC at the moment. Im browsing the area, and heading to small creeks. If anyone has some spots they suggest or hint I check out, id be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Brandon.
  15. View of the Zandmotor

    From the album @Max-fossils 's Zandmotor Finds

    A view of the Zandmotor, with many gulls in the background.
  16. Iowa and Nebraska

    Not sure where to post this, but here goes: I will be travelling west on I-80 through Iowa and Nebraska and wondered if anyone could recommend any easy-access fossil hunting sites within a half-hour / 45 min, or so, off of I-80 in Iowa or Nebraska. Preferably roadcuts or other relatively easy-access sites that are public and known not to draw problems from law enforcement or locals. I'm not interested in collecting vertebrates - just invertebrates. I've never hunted either state. Also, if anyone knows whether there are any regulations against fossil hunting along roadcuts, etc., in either state. Thanks for any help / suggestions!
  17. My main fossil collecting site is a Upper Pennsylvanian limestone roadcut that is rumored to have "some trilobites." I can find brachiopods galore but have never found a trilobite. What would it look like if I pulled a trilobite right out of the rock? Almost all of the brachiopods are found in a crumbly soft layer. Sometimes I can literally just pluck them out without tools. There are much harder layers present as well. Pic of the typical rock attached. Do I need to just split rocks in half until I find a cross section?
  18. A successful Zandmotor hunt!

    Hello everyone! Saturday, I went hunting again at the Zandmotor. Even though it is only 25 min away by car from my house, I don't get to hunt there often. First off, a small introduction to the Zandmotor: The Zandmotor is a big beach extension between Kijkduin and Ter Heijde, and it is made by man. The fossils found there are mainly seashells (clams and cockles), which fill the beach, and also mammal bones, which most people search for (most just ignore the seashells, which leaves more for a seashell-lover like me ). Sometimes great white shark teeth are found too, but they are the only species of shark found at the Zandmotor (from what I heard); it's a mystery as to how the shark teeth got there. All the fossils date from the Pleistocene to the Holocene periods (so they are relatively young). The reason that fossils can be found there is because the fossils got dredged up from the North Sea, which is very rich in fossils; the case is similar for the Maasvlakte 2 and the Hoek van Holland, two other locations on the Dutch coast. The Zandmotor actually just looks like any other normal sandy beach, and many people just use it as such. In fact many people that regularly go on the Zandmotor ignore that fossils can be found! The Zandmotor is also a popular place for taking your dog out for a walk. Now my trip report: When we arrived, it was still rather cloudy, but at least it wasn't raining and there was little wind. We did put on our fat coats and were well prepared to face the cold. The small crash of the waves and the squawk of the seagulls filled the air. In the background, the harbor could be seen. Lucky for us, the weather quickly cleared up and gave way to a nice blue sky.
  19. Ramanessin trip today

    Well decided to go to ramanessin today and see what Trevor missed from yesterday..lol... decided just to hike and surface hunt and did pretty well......the highlight of the trip was my first croc tooth....we were about to turn around and head back after a few hours of hunting ,but decided to round the bend and then turn around and that's when I found it
  20. This is a trip report (with photos) I wrote with my husband about a road trip we did last spring to dig for trilobites in southern Utah. We just wanted to share the info now that it is spring again! https://nomads-expeditions.blog/2016/05/26/digging-for-fossils-in-utah/
  21. Hi all, During my May holidays, I will be going to South Africa for a safari! I am very excited about the trip. We are also going to spend a few days in Cape Town, and I saw that it was possible to hunt for fossils there (finds include sharkteeth, like megs or great whites), on the beaches Big bay beach and Milnerton Beach. https://english.fossiel.net/sites/fossil_site.php?plaats=287 But I remember hearing that fossil collecting in South Africa is forbidden. But that surprises me, because nowhere on the link above does it say that it's forbidden to hunt, in fact it seems more as if they encourage you to hunt... Therefore I was wondering: is it possible to hunt at Cape Town? If yes, under what terms? If no, then why would Fossiel.net supply a location description that's illegal? Best regards, Max
  22. I live here in Iowa which is rich in devonian fossils. I have all the gear and I know how to properly clean fossils. The only problem is finding a place that I can look for fossils. I've tried getting access to some limestone and shale quarries but nobody wants me there because I'm considered a liability. Any suggestions on what I should do?
  23. Thought id share my wifes and my weekend....what started a couple months ago as a way to exercise has turned into a fun pass time and obsession,haha Saturday was cold only reaching 34 degrees yet the wifey hung in there with me and she actually found the biggest tooth of the day and we went back today and she found the smallest as well,lol we found some nice finds this weekend and again forum members were here for some quick id help which we thank and has over the past couple months with forum member help has really helped us learn so much in a short period of time and we just wanted again to give out a quick thank you and share this past weekend,,the last pic shows we were not alone..haha
  24. Hi everyone! I'm fairly new to Beaufort, SC. Recently moved up from FL where I hunted Peace River a lot. I'm hoping to connect with other fossil hunters in the area and maybe gain some local knowledge. I've watched a ton of videos of nice megalodon teeth being found in Summerville/Charleston area land sites, creeks, ditches. What I'm looking for is the possibility of similar sites here in Beaufort County but I don't know enough about local formations to draw any conclusions. I'm not a diver yet so my main focus is on land at the moment. I've hunted the sands at Port Royal with minimal success (the occasional small meg) but I'm really looking for the bigger stuff. I also have a kayak if that helps! Any info is greatly appreciated! Thanks!
  25. I was wondering I have went in the creeks of Gainesville and I've taken a trip to the Peace River. Is there anything in between them. I have been to rock springs but there isn't much there to find and they won't let you dig. I just want to find a place I can go and I don't have to drive over an hour to get to. Please anything helps. Thank you
×