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Found 140 results

  1. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Belemnite Phragmocone and part of the Pro-Ostracum Germany Jurassic Period (201.3-145 million years ago) Belemnitida (or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian age of the Lower Jurassic to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Belemnites studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey. However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid. Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons. The internal skeleton was composed of the guard or rostrum (plural: rostra), a heavy solid structure at the posterior of the animals. The rostrum was usually bullet-shaped and projects prominently backward, but in the suborder Belemnotheutina, it was only present as a thin layer. While the inherited camerate portion of the internal skeleton (see below) was of aragonite, the evolutionarily novel rostrum was composed of calcite. Due to its more geologically stable calcite constitution, the rostrum is often the only remains of the animals preserved, often in very large numbers in a given area. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Clade:†Belemnoidea Order: †Belemnitida
  2. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Belemnite Phragmocone and part of the Pro-Ostracum Germany Jurassic Period (201.3-145 million years ago) Belemnitida (or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian age of the Lower Jurassic to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Belemnites studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey. However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid. Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons. The internal skeleton was composed of the guard or rostrum (plural: rostra), a heavy solid structure at the posterior of the animals. The rostrum was usually bullet-shaped and projects prominently backward, but in the suborder Belemnotheutina, it was only present as a thin layer. While the inherited camerate portion of the internal skeleton (see below) was of aragonite, the evolutionarily novel rostrum was composed of calcite. Due to its more geologically stable calcite constitution, the rostrum is often the only remains of the animals preserved, often in very large numbers in a given area. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Clade:†Belemnoidea Order: †Belemnitida
  3. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Belemnite Phragmocone and part of the Pro-Ostracum Germany Jurassic Period (201.3-145 million years ago) Belemnitida (or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian age of the Lower Jurassic to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Belemnites studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey. However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid. Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons. The internal skeleton was composed of the guard or rostrum (plural: rostra), a heavy solid structure at the posterior of the animals. The rostrum was usually bullet-shaped and projects prominently backward, but in the suborder Belemnotheutina, it was only present as a thin layer. While the inherited camerate portion of the internal skeleton (see below) was of aragonite, the evolutionarily novel rostrum was composed of calcite. Due to its more geologically stable calcite constitution, the rostrum is often the only remains of the animals preserved, often in very large numbers in a given area. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Clade:†Belemnoidea Order: †Belemnitida
  4. JURASSIC AMMONITE GERMANY 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Perisphinctes sp. Ammonite Germany Late Jurassic Oxfordian (163.5 (+/- 1) - 157.3 (+/- 1) million years ago) Perisphinctes is an extinct genus of ammonite cephalopod. They lived during the Late Jurassic Epoch, and serve as an index fossil for that time period. Shells of species belonging to this genus have been found in the Jurassic of Antarctica, Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Madagascar, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Yemen. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Perisphinctidae Genus: †Perisphinctes
  5. JURASSIC AMMONITE GERMANY 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Perisphinctes sp. Ammonite Germany Late Jurassic Oxfordian (163.5 (+/- 1) - 157.3 (+/- 1) million years ago) Perisphinctes is an extinct genus of ammonite cephalopod. They lived during the Late Jurassic Epoch, and serve as an index fossil for that time period. Shells of species belonging to this genus have been found in the Jurassic of Antarctica, Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Madagascar, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Yemen. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Perisphinctidae Genus: †Perisphinctes
  6. JURASSIC AMMONITE GERMANY 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Perisphinctes sp. Ammonite Germany Late Jurassic Oxfordian (163.5 (+/- 1) - 157.3 (+/- 1) million years ago) Perisphinctes is an extinct genus of ammonite cephalopod. They lived during the Late Jurassic Epoch, and serve as an index fossil for that time period. Shells of species belonging to this genus have been found in the Jurassic of Antarctica, Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Madagascar, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Yemen. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Perisphinctidae Genus: †Perisphinctes
  7. Ammonite Help #2

    Again, a piece from my fossil buying trip locally! All I know from the store is Germany, Jurrasic, and Ammonite. Any ideas as to a genus? I love this one!
  8. Nothosaurus tooth

    From the album Triassic fossils

    This is my biggest Nothosaurus tooth until now with a length of 2.5 cm ! Its from a quarry near Zwingelhausen from the "Bonebed" (Triassic). Some more pictures:
  9. Nothosaurus vertebra

    From the album Triassic fossils

    A 3 cm long Nothosaurus vertebra from the "Bonebed" in a quarry near Zwingelhausen (Triassic).
  10. Birgeria mougeoti

    From the album Triassic fossils

    A fish tooth (Birgeria mougeoti) from the "Bonebed" in a quarry near Zwingelhausen (Triassic). Its about 1 cm long.and relatively common.
  11. In these two threads I mainly present finished prep results of the fossils I found in a quarry near Zwingelhausen: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/83796-maybe-a-new-emphasis/ http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/84219-some-more-bones-and-teeth/ But one of the reason why I currently hunt more in Zwingelhausen is that I can prep the fossils from Zwingelhausen with my new engraving pen (HW-10). Its somehow easier than prepping for example bones from Holzmaden, because there is a better sparation layer between the stone and the fossils. All fossils come from the triassic (Bonebed). At first this 5 cm long vertebra: You can only see the cross section: After 20 minutes of preparing: And the for now finished piece: I prepped it only from one site and didnt glue both sites together until now ... The second one I want to show is a rib fragment from Zwingelhausen: It was broken in three parts and was very difficult to prep. At first I began to prep from the other side but there the separation layer. Because of that there is this hole in the stone to ome to the other side of the fossil. Here is the finished prep work: (After three hours ...) I know that I am not very good in prepping fossils but I hope that I will learn much more in the future and that I become better and better !
  12. Some more bones and teeth !

    Last Sunday I was in the quarry Zwingelhausen and I found again some Triassic stuff ! I only searched in the "Bonebed", where you can find many bones but they are often damaged and worn. In this topic I already presented the quarry and some of my finds from there: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/83796-maybe-a-new-emphasis/ Here is a picture of the quarry: This time I found some nice ribs ... For example, this one: It's about 15 cm long and it was very difficult almost impossible to excavate it, because the stone is really hard and the fossil is very fragile ! I will post my finished "prep" (or better gluing) work in the next days Here is another small (5 cm long) rib fragment. It was fun to prep this one so although it's not nice or a complete piece I decided to post this one: The next one is a very nice vertebra: Unprepped: This job wasnt that hard because the separation layer between the stone and the fossil is distinctive and the fossil was already exposed mostly ! The vert is about 4 cm long: I think that most of my bones are Nothosaurus bones ... And the last one for today is this Acrodus tooth: They are very common but this one is big with a length of 1.2 cm and the preservation is very good in my eyes ! I will continue this topic in the next days ... Thanks for watching ! Hope you enjoyed
  13. Maybe a new emphasis?!

    Last Sunday I visited a quarry near Zwingelhausen (Germany), where you can find Triassic fossils. It was my second visit there so I am very inexperienced in Triassic fossils. Nevertheless I found some nice fossils (in my eyes ) and I am very satisfied with my haul. I mainly hunted in the "Bonebed", where you can find many bones but they are often damaged or completely destroyed. You need some patience to find some good ones ! I am also a newbie in term of preparing my fossils. I got my first engraving pen (a HW-10) two weeks ago so please excuse my bad preparation results First a picture of the quarry: Then some teeth: Acrodus teeth are very common but sometimes they became big ! This is a 1 cm long one: An unidentified fish tooth (1 cm long): A damaged Nothosaurus tooth (0.5 cm long): And my favourite tooth find until now: This one is very big (2.5 cm long ) I am really in love with this one !
  14. Steneosaurus tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1.3 cm long Steneosaurus (crocodile) tooth from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic). Some more pictures:
  15. From the album Vertebrates

    Rhinopteraspis dunensis Roemer, 1855 Early Devonian Upper Pragian Odenspiel North Rhine-Westphalia Germany Length 10cm / 4"
  16. Partial Anarosaurus skeleton

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    Partial skeleton of a Middle Triassic marine reptile Anarosaurus (relative of Keichousaurus) from Muschelkalk, Germany. B, C, F, G, H - close-ups of various limb bones and vertebrae D - 2 Anarosaurus teeth E - fish scale I - Nothosaurus mirabilis (?) tooth The last two finds make me think that it is actually a Nothosaurus coprolite with digested Anarosaurus remains and various fish scales.
  17. Tooth found at German lake

    Hello. Found this tooth at a like in southwestern Germany approx. 10 years ago. Can anyone help with the identification? Many thanks in advance.
  18. A lovely little extra in a collection of Devonian corals that I've recently bought. Heteractinid sponge, Astraeospongium or very similar, from the Givetian (Ahbach Formation, Zerberus Member) of Eifel, Germany. The spicules are up to about 2.5mm across.
  19. Good evening to all! This fossil is attributed as being a legitimate fossil fruit. According to the seller, it is of the species: Eomastixia saxonica (Pliocene - Germany). This is real?
  20. Orthoceras sp.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Orthoceras sp. Early Devonian Early Emsian Bundenbach Germany
  21. Devonian fish fossil Germany?

    Hi everyone, In 2011, I hunted for fossils in an area which is called the Eifel (Germany). This area is known for it's Devonian fossils, especially trilobites, corals and brachiopods. I have visited the Eifel several times, the last time I went there was 2016. The Eifel is rich of locations to hunt, so in 2011, I went to one of them, a small quarry which was overgrown by many plants. The fossils I discovered that day, were many parts of crinoides and a lot of brachiopods. I'm not sure anymore but I think the rocks of the quarry are Givetian or Eifelian age. When I left the quarry after a few hours, I picked up a stone with a strange structure on it. As a 11 year old, I didn't knew what it was. I posted pictures of it on the Dutch fossil forum last year and I was told that it could be parts of a placoderm, an armored fish. I was excited, because placoderm fossils are very rare in the Eifel. But I am stil not hundred percent sure so I was wondering what you think. Is it fish or is it something else, like a coral? Thanks in advance and greetings, Lars
  22. So most of the Christmas decorations--at least the outside ones are down! and I got sidetracked again when I went into the garage to put the decorations away. Started to move fossil boxes around and found myself looking in the dang things...I was thinking some of this stuff needs to go in a case and started to photograph some of it and make sure the labels were with them. I've still got some work to do but thought I'd show you much of it...could be a few pieces on the other side of the garage but here's the bulk of what I have from Germany... This collection started many years ago and as I've never been there to collect personally my distant relatives immigrated from there and another good friend influenced me with her German collections so thru Gifts, trades and purchases here you go. Hoping there is something in here you havent seen before. File names have Genus and location. Some small vertebrates... An amphibian and similar sized small fish. Most of a dragonfly Some crustaceans from Solnhofen Some plants Some belemnites
  23. A lizard preserved in the abdominal cavity of the dinosaur Compsognathus longipes holotype is actually a different species than originally thought and a new species Schoenesmahl dyspepsia from the Solnhofen Formation of Germany. Definitely different way of finding a new species. schoenesmahl dyspepsia schoenesmahl dyspepsia https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/advance-article/doi/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlx055/4757449?searchresult=1 A new lizard (Squamata) was the last meal of Compsognathus (Theropoda: Dinosauria) and is a holotype in a holotype Jack L Conrad, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, zlx055, https://doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlx055 Published:18 December 2017
  24. TRIASSIC PLESIOSAUR

    An interesting early plesiosaur. http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42339936
  25. Paramblypterus (8).jpg

    From the album Paramblypterus 3

    Paramblypterus from location Albessen, Rhineland-Pallatinate, Germany permian age 285 mio, Unterrotliegendes, Rotliegend, Perm
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