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Found 30 results

  1. Shark River Location

    I was looking into going to Shark River NJ and I was wondering at which part of Shark River cuts through formation as it is pretty long. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
  2. I'm still learning how to select fossil hunting sites. Unfortunately any of the common ones that everybody goes to is over 6 hours away and doesn't turn up more than shark teeth. Would the area I selected on this map be suitable for hunting? My concern is that it's sandy, but I obviously can't tell what lies below that or right along the banks. I would primarily be hunting in or near the water. Any thoughts on this location, or any locations that are within two hours of Biloxi, MS would be appreciated. Thanks! -C
  3. Fish I.D.

    I have this fish that's been in the family for 20 or 30 years, but no one seems to remember where it came from or what species of fish! Anyone have any ideas as to the species or possible location? Thanks!
  4. A return: Tales of my uncle's truck travels

    Again, it's been a while. Today I've been at my Mom's memorial service, as she passed away in the past week, effectively leaving me without parents. It's been really hard for me to feel good about much anything recently, so here's something else to think about for a change: After the service, my uncle Austin came to me to say he found a fossil. Usually he just jokingly comes to me with a chunk of basalt, saying it's an "alien bone" This time was different, though. He presented me with this: There's a good number of bryozoans, I think a few crinoid sections, and a piece of brachiopod or two on all sides of this piece. What I'm wondering is what formation/age it would be. Austin said he'd found it at a truck stop somewhere in Utah or California, so that could be a clue. Anyone from that area know what formation this may be from?
  5. Eocene Conifer Plant Fossil?

    Hello everyone, I got this piece at an estate sale on Saturday, huge fossil, 7.8 inch/15.7 inch (20 cm x 40 cm), I'm not sure the provenience. Any help will be much appreciated! Thank you.
  6. Hi ho everyone, in fairly new to this forum and was wondering if anyone knows some fossil hunting locations in southeast Oklahoma. I live near the Claremore area and am looking for anywhere good streams, quarries eager to start my dino digging.
  7. So I've always been interested in fossils and history of any sort. A few weeks ago I was doing some exploring in the Flinders Ranges and found this bit of ancient sea bed. So I decided to explore a little closer to home, at Turimetta Beach and found these (and lots more) I couldn't go right at low tide so was limited to the part of the headland I could get to, now I have a taste for it I'd like to go do some more searching, are there any other spots close to Sydney (I'm on the upper North shore)? Cheers Steve
  8. I’m in Birmingham for a few days. Does anyone know of any cool fossil shops or cool places to go? Thank you in advance. Sincerely, J
  9. Batesford limestone quarry

    Hi. I'm very new and have never done this before however i have taken an interest in fossicking. As i live in Melbourne Australia, I plan to visit the Batesford limestone quarry to look for some shark teeth. I wonder if anyone can guide me about what i need, if any license is needed, specific area i need to go to, if it is open for public and other stuff that i may need to know. I know a lot of people here have done fossicking here but i can't seem to find any details on the stuff i mentioned above. Thank you so much and hope to hear from you guys soon!
  10. I am desperately trying to find some places to collect where i live in Wakefield, West Yorkshire. There is some woods near my house and the path ways are filled what i believe to be coal? Could this be an indicator that fossils are around?
  11. I keep hearing about Penn/Miss sites near the GA/AL border, and seeing that my collection is severely lacking, I am dying to find a formation exposure that isn't on the opposite end of the globe from where I am. I found some hope of finding a place with this scholarly article on NW GA (though it's an article that's older than my grandparents): https://epd.georgia.gov/sites/epd.georgia.gov/files/related_files/site_page/B-62.pdf 2 formations stuck out from what I could make of it from my first quick skim: • Vandever Formation • Rockcastle Formation These two appear to produce some pretty nice Penn. flora. Would love to go and hunt these formations for their treasures! Locations and availability information? Thanks in advance!
  12. Concretions

    advice on opening concretions without damaging fossils inside?
  13. Dutch Creek

    I have read that fossils and shark teeth can be found in a place called Dutch Creek. Does any one know where it is located?
  14. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since April 26, 2018. Order Saurischia Suborder Theropoda General Theropoda General Theropoda - Africa/Middle East Fanti, F. and F. Therrien (2007). Theropod tooth assemblages from the Late Cretaceous Maevarano Formation and the possible presence of dromaeosaurids in Madagascar. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(1). Fanti, F., et al. (2014). Integrating palaeoecology and morphology in theropod diversity estimation: A case from the Aptian-Albian of Tunisia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 410. Galton, P.M. and R.E. Molnar (2012). An unusually large theropod dinosaur tooth from the Kirkwood Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of South Africa. N.Jb.Geol.Palaont.Abh., 263/1. Knoll, F. and J.I. Ruiz-Omenaca (2009). Theropod teeth from the basalmost Cretaceous of Anoual (Morocco) and their palaeobiogeographical significance. Geol.Mag., 146(4). Maganuco, S., A. Cau and G. Pasini (2005). First description of theropod remains from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Madagascar. Atti Soc.it.Sci.nat. Museo civ.Stor.nat. Milano, 146(II). Mateer, N.J. (1987). A New Report of a Theropod Dinosaur from South Africa. Palaeontology, Vol.30, Part 1. Niedźwiedzki, G. and G. Gierliński (2002). Isolated theropod teeth from the Cretaceous strata of Khouribga, Morocco. Geological Quarterly, 46(1). Novas, F.E., F. Dalla Vecchia and D.F. Pais (2005). Theropod pedal unguals from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Morocco, Africa. Rev.Mus. Argentino Cienc.Nat., n.s., 7(2). Rauhut, O.W.M. (2011). Theropod Dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology, Special Papers in Palaeontology, 86. Ray, S. and A. Chinsamy (2002). A theropod tooth from the Late Triassic of southern Africa. J.Biosci., 27. Richter, U., A. Mudroch and L.G. Buckley (2012). Isolated theropod teeth from the Kem Kem Beds (Early Cenomanian) near Taouz, Morocco. Palaontol.Z., 87(2). (Author's personal copy) Sampson, S.D., et al. (1998). Predatory Dinosaur Remains from Madagascar: Implications for the Cretaceous Biogeography of Gondwana. Science, Vol.280. Serrano-Martinez, A., et al. (2016). Isolated theropod teeth from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the early dental evolution of Spinosauridae. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(2). Sereno, P.C., et al. (1996). Predatory Dinosaurs from the Sahara and Late Cretaceous Faunal Differentiation. Science, Vol.272. General Theropoda - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Averianov, A.O. (2015). Frontal bones of non-avian theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous (Santonian-?Campanian) Bostobe Formation of the northeastern Aral Sea region, Kazakhstan. Can.J. Earth Sci., 53. Averianov, A.O. (2007). Theropod dinosaurs from Late Cretaceous deposits in the northeastern Aral Sea region, Kazakhstan. Cretaceous Research, 28. Brusatte, S.L., R.B.J. Benson and X. Xu (2010). The evolution of large-bodied theropod dinosaurs during the Mesozoic in Asia. Journal of Iberian Geology, 36(2). Han, F., et al. (2011). Theropod Teeth from the Middle-Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of Northwest Xinjiang, China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 31(1). Maisch, M.W. and A.T. Matzke (2003). Theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia) from the Middle Jurassic Toutunhe Formation of the Southern Junggar Basin, NW China. Palaontologische Zeitschrift, 77(2). Mo, J.-Y. and X. Xu (2012). Large theropod teeth from the Upper Cretaceous of Jiangxi, southern China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 53(1). Obsorn, H.F. (1924). Three New Theropoda, Protoceratops Zone, Central Mongolia. American Museum Novitates, Number 144. Stilwell, J.D., et al. (2006). Dinosaur sanctuary on the Chatham Islands, Southwest Pacific: First record of theropods from the K-T boundary, Takatika Grit. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 230. Sues, H.-D. and A. Averianov (2013). Enigmatic teeth of small theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Turonian) of Uzbekistan. Can.J. Earth Sci., 50. General Theropoda - Australia/New Zealand Benson, R.B.J., et al. (2012). Theropod Fauna from Southern Australia Indicates High Polar Diversity and Climate-Driven Dinosaur Provinciality. PLoS ONE, 7(5). Long, J.A. (1995). A theropod dinosaur bone from the Late Cretaceous Molecap Greensand, Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 17. Long, J.A. and A.R.I. Cruickshank (1996). First record of an Early Cretaceous theropod dinosaur bone from Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 18. Molnar, R.E., J. Wiffen and B. Hayes (1998). A probable theropod bone from the latest Jurassic of New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, Vol.41. Thulborn, T. (1998). Australia's Earliest Theropods: Footprint Evidence in the Ipswich Coal Measures (Upper Triassic) of Queensland. GAIA, Number 15. General Theropoda - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Averianov, A.O. and A.A. Yarkov (2004). Carnivorous Dinosaurs (Saurischia, Theropoda) from the Maastrichtian of the Volga-Don Interfluve, Russia. Paleontological Journal, Vol.38, Number 1. Canudo, J.I., et al. (2006). A metatheropod tooth from the late Tithonian-middle Berriasian (Jurassic-Cretaceous transition) of Galve (Aragon, NE Spain). N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., 239(1). Csiki, Z. and D. Grigorescu (1998). Small Theropods from the Late Cretaceous of the Hateg Basin (Western Romania) - An Unexpected Diversity at the Top of the Food Chain. Oryctos, Vol.1. Delsate, D. and M.D. Ezcurra (2014). The first Early Jurassic (late Hettangian) theropod dinosaur remains from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Geologica Belgica, 17/2. Ezcuerra, R., et al. (2007). Were non-avian theropod dinosaurs able to swim? Supportive evidence from an Early Cretaceous trackway, Cameros Basin (La Rioja, Spain). Geology, Vol.35, Number 6. Gerke, O. and O. Wings (2016). Multivariate and Cladistic Analysis of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany. PLoS ONE, 11(7). (Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Knoll, F., E. Buffetaut and M. Bulow (1999). A theropod braincase from the Jurassic of the Vaches Noires cliffs (Normandy, France): osteology and palaeoneurology. Bull.Soc.geol. France, Vol.170, Number 1. Lindgren, J., et al. (2008). Theropod dinosaur teeth from the lowermost Cretaceous Rabekke Formation on Bornholm, Denmark. Geobios, 41. Madzia, D. (2014). The first non-avian theropod from the Czech Republic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(4). Mateus, I., et al. (1998). Upper Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur embryos from Lourinhã (Portugal). Memorias da Academia de Ciencias de Lisboa, Vol.37. Mateus, O., A. Walen and M.T. Antunes (2006). The Large Theropod Fauna of the Lourinhã Formation (Portugal) and its Similarity to the Morrison Formation, With a Description of a New Species of Allosaurus. In: Paleontology and Geology of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 36. Naish, D. (1999). Theropod dinosaur diversity and palaeobiology in the Wealden Group (Early Cretaceous) of England: evidence from a previously undescribed tibia. Geologie en Mijnbouw, 78. Rauhut, O.W.M. and A. Hungerbühler (1998). A Review of European Triassic Theropods. GAIA, Number 15. Rauhut, O.W.M. and J. Kriwet (1994). Teeth of a big Theropod Dinosaur from Porto das Barcas (Portugal). Berliner geowiss. Abh., E 13. Rauhut, O.W.M., et al. (2018). The largest European theropod dinosaurs: remains of a gigantic megalosaurid and giant theropod tracks from the Kimmeridgian of Asturias, Spain. PeerJ, 6:e4963. (36.3MB) (Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Ribeiro, V, et al. (2014). Two new theropod egg sites from the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, Portugal. Historical Biology, Vol.26, Number 2. Sanguino, F. (2018). The Mesozoic Record of Iberian Theropods. Torices, A., et al. (2015). Theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of the South Pyrenees Basin of Spain. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 60(3). Zinke, J. and O.W.M. Rauhut (1994). Small theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia) from the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous of the Iberian Peninsula. Berliner geowiss. Abh., E 13. General Theropoda - North America Brownstein, C. (2018). Theropod hindlimbs with feeding and other traces reveal ecosystem dynamics in the Maastrichtian of eastern North America. PeerJ Preprints. (Not peer-reviewed) Dalman, S.G. (2014). New data on small theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Como Bluff, Wyoming, USA. Volumina Jurassica, XII(2). Fiorillo, A.R. and R.A. Gangloff (2000). Theropod Teeth from the Prince Creek Formation (Cretaceous) of Northern Alaska, With Speculations on Arctic Dinosaur Paleoecology. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(4). Fiorillo, A.R. and P.J. Currie (1994). Theropod Teeth from the Judith River Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of South-Central Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 14(1). Gates, T.A., L.E. Zanno and P.J. Mackovicky (2015). Theropod teeth from the upper Maastrichtian Hell Creek Formation "Sue" Quarry: New morphotypes and faunal comparisons. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 60(1). Henderson, D.M. (1998). Skull and Tooth Morphology as Indicators of Niche Partitioning in Sympatric Morrison Formation Theropods. Gaia, Number 15. Kundrat, M. (2004). When Did Theropods Become Feathered? - Evidence for Pre-Archaeopteryx Feathery Appendages. Journal of Experimental Zoology (Mol Dev Evol), 302B. Krumenacker, L.J., et al. (2015). Theropod dinosaurs from the Albian-Cenomanian Wayan Formation of eastern Idaho. Historical Biology, 2015. Larson, D.W. (2008). Diversity and variation of theropod dinosaur teeth from the uppermost Santonian Milk River Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Alberta: a quantitative method supporting identification of the oldest dinosaur tooth assemblage in Canada. Can.J. Earth Sci., 45. Paul, G.S. (1988). Small Predatory Dinosaurs of the Mid-Mesozoic: The Horned Theropods of the Morrison and Great Oolite - Ornitholestes and Proceratosaurus - and the Sickle-Claw Theropods of the Cloverly, Djadokhta and Judith River - Deinonychus, Velociraptor and Saurornitholestes. Hunteria, Vol.2, Number 4. Sankey, J.T., et al. (2002). Small Theropod and Bird Teeth from the Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian) Judith River Group, Alberta. J.Paleont., 76(4). Sarigul, V. (2017). New Theropod Fossils from the Upper Triassic Dockum Group of Texas, USA, and a Brief Overview of the Dockum Theropod Diversity. PaleoBios, 34. Wick, S.L., T.M. Lehman and A.A. Brink (2015). A theropod tooth assemblage from the lower Aguja Formation (early Campanian) of West Texas, and the roles of small theropod and varanoid lizard mesopredators in a tropical predator guild. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 418. Williamson, T.E. and S.L. Brusatte (2014). Small Theropod Teeth from the Late Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin, Northwestern New Mexico and Their Implications for Understanding Latest Cretaceous Dinosaur Evolution. PLoS ONE, 9(4). Zanno, L.E., et al. (2013). 22. Late Cretaceous Theropod Dinosaurs of Southern Utah. In: At the top of the Grand Staircase: The Late Cretaceous of southern Utah. Titus, A.L. and M.A. Loewen (eds.), Indiana University Press, Indianapolis. Zanno, L.E., et al. (2010). A Preliminary Report on the Theropod Dinosaur Fauna of the Late Campanian Kaiparowits Formation, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. In: Learning from the Land, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Science Symposium Proceedings. Eaton, M. (ed.), Grand Staircase-Escalante Partners, Kanab, Utah. General Theropoda - South America/Central America/Caribbean Canale, J.I., et al. (2017). The oldest theropods from the Neuquen Basin: Predatory dinosaur diversity from the Bajada Colorada Formation (Lower Cretaceous: Berriasian-Valanginian), Neuquen, Argentina. Cretaceous Research, 71. Candeiro, C.R.A., P.J. Currie and L.P. Bergqvist (2012). Theropod teeth from the Marília Formation (Late Maastrichtian) at the paleontological site of Peirópolis in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Geociências, Vol.42(2). Ezcurra, M.D. (2009). Theropod remains from the uppermost Cretaceous of Colombia and their implications for the palaeozoogeography of western Gondwana. Cretaceous Research, 30. (Author's personal copy) Ezcurra, M.D. and F.E. Novas (2016). Theropod dinosaurs from Argentina. Machado, E.B., D. de A. Campos and A.W.A. Kellner (2008). On a theropod scapula (Upper Cretaceous) from the Marilia Formation, Bauru Group, Brazil. Palaontologische Zeitschrift, 82/3. Motta, M.J., et al. (2016). New Theropod Fauna from the Upper Cretaceous (Huincul Formation) of Northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. In: Cretaceous Period: Biotic Diversity and Biogeography. Khosla, A. and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 71. Novas, F.E., et al. (2013). Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research, xxx. (Article in press) Rauhut, O.W.M. (2007). A fragmentary theropod skull from the Middle Jurassic of Patagonia. Ameghiniana, 44(2). General Theropoda Barsbold, R. (1983). "Avian" Features in the Morphology of Predatory Dinosaurs. Transactions of the Joint Soviet Mongolian Paleontological Expedition, 24. Barta, D.E., S.J. Nesbitt and M.A. Norell (2017). The evolution of the manus of early theropod dinosaurs is characterized by high inter- and intraspecific variation. Journal of Anatomy (2017). (Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Benson, R.B.J., et al. (2012). Air-filled postcranial bones in theropod dinosaurs: physiological implications and the 'reptile'-bird transition. Biological Reviews, 87. Bishop, P.J., et al. (2018). The influence of speed and size on avian terrestrial locomotor biomechanics: Predicting locomotion in extinct theropod dinosaurs. PLoS ONE, 13(2). Brink, K.S., et al. (2015). Developmental and evolutionary novelty in the serrated teeth of theropod dinosaurs. Scientific Reports, 5:12338. (Thanks to doushantuo for finding this one!) Carpenter, K. (2002). Forelimb Biomechanics of Nonavian Theropod Dinosaurs in Predation. Senckenbergiana lethaea, 82(1). Carpenter, K. (1998). Evidence of Predatory Behavior by Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Gaia, Number 15. Christiansen, P. (1998). Strength Indicator Values of Theropod Long Bones, With Comments on Limb Proportions and Cursorial Potential. Gaia, Number 15. Christiansen, P. and R.A. Farina (2004). Mass Prediction in Theropod Dinosaurs. Historical Biology, Vol.16(2-4). Chure, D.J. (1998). On the Orbit of Theropod Dinosaurs. Gaia, Number 15. Farlow, J.O. and E.R. Pianka (2002). Body Size Overlap, Habitat Partitioning and Living Space Requirements of Terrestrial Vertebrate Predators: Implications for the Paleoecology of Large Theropod Dinosaurs. Historical Biology, Vol.16(1). Farlow, J.O., et al. (2000). Theropod Locomotion. Amer.Zool., 40. Foth, C. and O.W.M. Rauhut (2013). 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  15. German fossil sites

    Hi guys ,I'm planning a 3 days of break from work to Germany to visit maybe a fossil quarry , anyone can give me some advice? I will fly to Hamburg so I need something close to it.
  16. I just found the site. I collected as a child but don't know where. I now have a son that is extremely interested in fossils and dinosaurs and want to take him to find fossils the way I did. Can anyone tell me a place where we can legally hunt for them? (In or around Louisville area) I'm open to a guide, if you don't mind being asked every question his inquisitive mind has. I want to share my memory while encouraging his passion. Thank you for any and all help. It's greatly appreciated.
  17. question about UK location

    hi guys, anyone know if the Crock hey mine in wigan (lancashire) it's still ok for fossil hunting? heard about this place but i found just few old news on the web.
  18. Best way to find members in my area

    What is the most effective way to locate members in my area to plan fossil collecting tirips? Dan
  19. Resources for choosing sites

    Hi guys, I was wondering if you had any resources or methods you like to use when choosing sites to fossil hunt? Are there maps of public land? Are the only options fossil specific parks, and asking someone with land? Whats your scoop/etiquette? Places within a couple hours from Central Texas? Thanks!
  20. Hi I am in northen Ireland for 3 weeks and I have been up to larne searching for Waterloo bay I think I have found the right area it is just off the big arch way going through the mountain. But it was high tide so I could not go down to the beachI am just wondering if that is the beach that contains the fossils.also If anyone could please tell me if the majority of fossils I find are embedded in rock or just sitting in the sand loosely thanks a bunch.
  21. Columbia SC for turkey day

    I will be going to Columbia SC. For thanksgiving and wanting to go fossil hunting. I will be there with family so a kid friendly place would be nice. I have never hunted up that way yet.. Well thanks for any help in advance.
  22. I'm always looking for new spots in the Gainesville/Alachua county so I don't deplete or cause repeat damage to my favorite areas in Ring Park. I heard a passing rumor that the walls of Devil's Millhopper have various shark teeth and bones embedded in the soil. Does anyone know if this is true? I'm ashamed to say that although I practicly live right next to it, I haven't been to the Devil's Millhopper in years, well before my fossil hunting craze. I'm also wondering if, in the case that there ARE teeth in the walls, people allowed to remove them? I understand the instability of sinkhole walls and don't want to cause a problem in the park.
  23. Coronocephalus?

    This Coronocephalus trilobite just arrived in the mail. I don't really know a lot about them. I believe it is most likely C. gaoluoensis. I do know its from Hunan, China, but not much else. Middle Silurian? Anyone got any info? Also, what do you guys think of the fossil? I quite like it even though it needs to be cleaned up a little. Thanx!
  24. I am currently staying in Pigeon forge in Tennesse, and am looking forward to a spring break with tons of new specimens (and maybe even a FOTUM entry?(excuse my current inability to find a way to get better pictures of my bivalve last month)). Being a state very abundant in Ordovician fossils, I have heard across the internet that Tennessee is LITTERED with specimens (especially Nashville, not to mention a site being at a Target). I would willingly take the 3 and a half hour trip from pigeon forge and hunt in Nashville all day each day of the week, but before I went through the trouble of going to such lengths, I was wondering if there were any fossil sites closer to Pigeon forge where you could find specimens (not including Cades Cove), as I cannot find of any said sites on the internet. Any ideas? Thanks!
  25. This is a great resource to see where "scientifically" document fossils have been located, with documentation. Just click on launch navigator,you can filter over the map by any search term or by time! https://paleobiodb.org/#/
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