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Found 80 results

  1. I had already planned on sharing this a couple days ago. With the recent posting of the Martian pseudocrinoid, the timing of this new paper is perfect! Bonus Points Question: Trombonicrinus (col.) hanshessi gen. et sp. nov. Does anyone have a suggestion for the use of the abbreviation (col.)? A colleague responded: "Odd. I imagine it is for column, but do not really know. If so, it would be as if they are regarded it as a form genus allowed in the botanical, but not the zoological code." Etymology: From the French trombone (earlier, trombon), a brass wind instrument with a slide bent in a tight U-shape (Little et al. 1983, p. 2368). The overall appearance of this crinoid stem is reminiscent of the slide of a trombone. Donovan, S.K., Waters, J.A. and Pankowski, M.S. 2018 Form and function of the strangest crinoid stem: Devonian of Morocco. Swiss Journal of Palaeontology, (ahead-of-print publication) 6 pp.
  2. Kainops invius Trilobite.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Kainops invius Trilobite Bois d’Arc Formation, Oklahoma Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Kainops is a genus of trilobites from the family Phacopidae, order Phacopida. It can be distinguished from Paciphacops by the greater number of facets to the eye (6–8 per row, compared to 3–4 in Paciphacops). The form of the furrow between the palpebral area and the palpebral lobe also distinguishes Kainops from the genera Paciphacops and Viaphacops. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Phacopidae Genus: †Kainops Species: †invius
  3. Several weeks ago a brief break in the weather and snow cover permitted a hike in Montague where we saw a modest outcrop of the Port Jervis Formation. A similar short spell of nice weather earlier this week, it is snowing now, afforded the opportunity to check it out. The characteristic specimens Phalangocephalus dentatus, Barrett 1874, and Nanothyris subglobosa, Weller 1903. Cheers, Gordon
  4. Unidentified Pygidium

    From the album Trilobites

    Taxonomy: Unknown/unidentified Age: Lower Devonian Location: London (mixed import fill: Bois Blanc, Amherstberg, Dundee) Source: Self-collected Unknown trilobite pygidium. Axial sits very high on specimen, tapering and with slightly incised axial rings (similar to Anchiopsis anchiops, but no terminal pygidial spike). Most similar to Mannopyge halli, but missing nodes on pygidial border. The presence of a border does suggest a dechenellid. That's all I know! Searching through my literature has not yielded a close enough match.
  5. Discomyorthis oblata Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Discomyorthis oblata Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: †Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Rhipidomellidae Genus: †Discomyorthis Species: †oblata
  6. Discomyorthis oblata Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Discomyorthis oblata Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: †Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Rhipidomellidae Genus: †Discomyorthis Species: †oblata
  7. Leptaena acuticuspidata Brachiopod.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Leptaena acuticuspidata Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Leptaena, genus of extinct brachiopods (lamp shells) commonly found as fossils in Ordovician to Lower Carboniferous sedimentary rocks (between 488 million and 318 million years old). The very distinctive shell of Leptaena is characterized by its wrinkled ornamentation and fine linear markings. Leptanea (Dalman 1828) is a flat, Strophomenid type shell that develops a defined lip. This prolific and long lived genera is easily recognizable and can be found in rocks from the Ordovician through the Carboniferous. Strophomenata is an extinct class of brachiopods in the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: †Strophomenata Order: †Strophomenata Family: †Rafinesquinidae Genus: †Leptaena Species: †acuticuspidata
  8. Anastrophia grossa Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anastrophia grossa Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Data: The genus Anastrophia first becomes widely seen in the Silurian and it extends into the lower Devonian before disappearing from the fossil record. The specimens below are Anastrophia grossa from the Bois d'Arc formation of Oklahoma. The shell is subpentagonal in outline with coarse costae present on both valves. There is a shallow sulcus on the pedicle valve that becomes much more expressed at the anterior margin forming a "u" shape. The corresponding fold is also shallow. Both valves are convex with the brachial valve being more so than the pedicle valve. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Pentamerida Family: †Parastrophinidae Genus: †Anastrophia Species: †grossa
  9. Anastrophia grossa Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anastrophia grossa Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Data: The genus Anastrophia first becomes widely seen in the Silurian and it extends into the lower Devonian before disappearing from the fossil record. The specimens below are Anastrophia grossa from the Bois d'Arc formation of Oklahoma. The shell is subpentagonal in outline with coarse costae present on both valves. There is a shallow sulcus on the pedicle valve that becomes much more expressed at the anterior margin forming a "u" shape. The corresponding fold is also shallow. Both valves are convex with the brachial valve being more so than the pedicle valve. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Pentamerida Family: †Parastrophinidae Genus: †Anastrophia Species: †grossa
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Levenea subcarinata pumilis Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) One of the more common brachiopods that are found in the Bois d'Arc formation is Levenea subcarinata pumilis. It is similar to Rhipimelloides oblata except for a few key features. The hinge line is wide and straight and the presence of a wide, shallow fold/sulcus structure. Otherwise they share some similar traits like the rounded shape to the shell and the pedicle valve extending slightly past the brachial valve. Another difference are the fine costae on the valve surfaces which on L. subcarinata pumilis are more curved instead of straight. the margin between the valves is flat except for where it bends to follow the fold/sulcus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Dalmanellidae Genus: †Levenea Species: †subcarinata pumilis
  11. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Levenea subcarinata pumilis Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) One of the more common brachiopods that are found in the Bois d'Arc formation is Levenea subcarinata pumilis. It is similar to Rhipimelloides oblata except for a few key features. The hinge line is wide and straight and the presence of a wide, shallow fold/sulcus structure. Otherwise they share some similar traits like the rounded shape to the shell and the pedicle valve extending slightly past the brachial valve. Another difference are the fine costae on the valve surfaces which on L. subcarinata pumilis are more curved instead of straight. the margin between the valves is flat except for where it bends to follow the fold/sulcus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Dalmanellidae Genus: †Levenea Species: †subcarinata pumilis
  12. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orthostrophia strophomenoides parva Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Orthidae Genus: †Orthostrophia Species: †strophomenoides parva
  13. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orthostrophia strophomenoides parva Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Orthidae Genus: †Orthostrophia Species: †strophomenoides parva
  14. Obturamentella wadei Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Obturamentella wadei Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Obturamentellidae Genus: †Obturamentella Species: †wadei
  15. Obturamentella wadei Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Obturamentella wadei Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Obturamentellidae Genus: †Obturamentella Species: †wadei
  16. Meristella atoka Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Meristella atoka Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Meristella is an extinct genus of brachiopods found from the Late Silurian to the Late Devonian They are characterized by a smooth oval shell and a prominent incurved beak on the pedicle valve. Meristella is placed in the family Meristellidae of the articulate brachiopod order Athyridida. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Athyridida Family: †Meristellidae Genus: †Meristella Species: †atoka
  17. Meristella atoka Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Meristella atoka Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Meristella is an extinct genus of brachiopods found from the Late Silurian to the Late Devonian They are characterized by a smooth oval shell and a prominent incurved beak on the pedicle valve. Meristella is placed in the family Meristellidae of the articulate brachiopod order Athyridida. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Athyridida Family: †Meristellidae Genus: †Meristella Species: †atoka
  18. Atrypa oklahomensis Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Atrypa oklahomensis Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Atrypa is a genus of brachiopod with shells round to short egg-shaped, covered with many fine radial ridges (or costae), that split further out and growthlines perpendicular to the costae and 2-3 times wider spaced. The pedunculate valve is a little convex, but tends to level out or even become slightly concave toward the anterior margin (that is: opposite hinge and pedicle). The brachial valve is highly convex. There is no interarea (that is a flat area bordering the hinge line approximately perpendicular with the rest of the valve) in either valve. Atrypa was a cosmopolitan and occurred from the late Lower Silurian (Telychian) to the early Upper Devonian (Frasnian). Other sources expand the range from the Late Ordovician to Carboniferous, approximately from 449 to 336 Ma. A proposed new species, A. harrisi, was found in the trilobite-rich Floresta Formation in Boyacá, Colombia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Spiriferida Family: †Atrypidae Genus: †Atrypa Species: †oklahomensis
  19. Atrypa oklahomensis Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Atrypa oklahomensis Brachiopod Bois d'Arc Formation (overlays the Haragan) of Oklahoma TIME PERIOD: Lower Devonian (359-383 Million Years Ago) Atrypa is a genus of brachiopod with shells round to short egg-shaped, covered with many fine radial ridges (or costae), that split further out and growthlines perpendicular to the costae and 2-3 times wider spaced. The pedunculate valve is a little convex, but tends to level out or even become slightly concave toward the anterior margin (that is: opposite hinge and pedicle). The brachial valve is highly convex. There is no interarea (that is a flat area bordering the hinge line approximately perpendicular with the rest of the valve) in either valve. Atrypa was a cosmopolitan and occurred from the late Lower Silurian (Telychian) to the early Upper Devonian (Frasnian). Other sources expand the range from the Late Ordovician to Carboniferous, approximately from 449 to 336 Ma. A proposed new species, A. harrisi, was found in the trilobite-rich Floresta Formation in Boyacá, Colombia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Spiriferida Family: †Atrypidae Genus: †Atrypa Species: †oklahomensis
  20. Eldredgeia eocryphaeus

    From the album Trilobites

    Taxonomy: Eldredgeia eocryphaeus Age: Lower Devonian (Belen Fm) Location: La Paz, Bolivia Source: Purchased
  21. Malvinella buddeae

    From the album Trilobites

    Taxonomy: Malvinella buddeae Age: Lower Devonian (Belen Fm) Location: La Paz, Bolivia Source: Purchased
  22. Eldredgeia venustus

    From the album Trilobites

    Taxonomy: Eldredgeia venustus Age: Lower Devonian (Belen Fm) Location: La Paz, Bolivia Source: Purchased
  23. Bois Blanc "Spine"

    A few weeks ago I had posted some finds from the imported fill from the Bois Blanc Fm, and one in particular that resembles a trilobite genal spine. I went back today to collect and photograph it. It appears in a sandy matrix reminiscent of the Springvale Mbr of the Bois Blanc Fm., lower Devonian. It is a fairly substantial size compared to the usual array of brachs, etc. I'd have to rule out Anchiopsis since they do not have such a long genal spine. I can probably also rule out the thick lip of a Leptaena brach. Total length of visible part of the specimen is a little over 40 mm, but is likely a bit longer. The brown "crust" usually signals the presence of trilobite in these rocks. I have a piece of the imprint with more of the brown shell somewhere in the house. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks.
  24. Lower Devonian Trilobite These specimens from a chert bed in the Kalkberg Formation Hannacroix Member near Port Jervis, NY. This ~1” thick bed accumulated brachiopods and the occasional gastropod; parts of Paciphacops sp. are also present. Pictured specimens were recently collected by the neighbor's grandsons. The partial cephalon has a fairly well defined eye, which may permit distinguishing it as a P. hudsoniscus rather than P. Logani (see Trilobites of NY Fig.5.4). The cephalon is protruding from the bottom of the plate shown. Gordon (scale for cephalon blurred partial penny low rh )
  25. Mannopyge halli

    From the album Trilobites

    Taxonomy: Mannopyge halli (pygidium only) Age: Lower Devonian (Amherstberg Fm) Location: London, Canada (imported fill from Niagara escarpment) Source: Field Collection
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