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Found 58 results

  1. Not sure what this might be, but I thought is was the most intriguing find of the day. Beautiful patina, weighty for its size. Very old?
  2. Odd bones from the Brazos

    These are a couple of odd bones from the Brazos River between SH 159 and FM 529. They appear to be the same thing, other than size, and they appear to be from opposite sides of the animal. The smaller one is 11.5 cm long and is pretty much intact. The larger one is 25 cm and is broken at the tip and the rounded lobe end. It probably would have been 30 cm plus. They are highly mineralized. Any idea what these might be?
  3. Hi, I've collected this fossil on a beach near Balchik in Bulgaria and have wandered what it is. On the same beach I've also found small parts of bones and a partial vertebrae. Since there have been previous finds from Deinotherium bavaricum , Trilophodon angus-tidens and Choerolophodon pentelici in the region I was pretty exited that I've found a part of a tusk or one from a baby, but I am really not sure what exactly the fossil is. Please if you have any good guesses for the origin of the fossil please let me know.
  4. I spent another great day in the Hell Creek formation of South Dakota (w/ Paleoprospectors) and found a lot of great fossils. It was a beautiful day, the temperature wasn't bad at all, helped by the occasional breeze and the bugs were tolerable for the most part. We started the day on a microsite which was eroding out of the side of a hill. The iron siderite pebbles were sharp to sit on and the slope was steep- being sure footed was certainly an asset along a good portion of this exposure. In spite of those factors, I still found some awesome fossils. A view of the microsite from the ground. My first good find of the day- A worn Richardoestesia tooth Most likely a Myledaphus vertebra A Champsosaur vertebra in situ An Amphibian vertebra- probably salamander. Probably my best find of the day- a claw whose identity is currently unknown. Two great anthill finds- Top: likely a marsupial tooth (Alphadon?)- Bottom: a multituberculate tooth (Cimolodon?) After these finds, I went to prospect with some other people but unfortunately came up empty handed. At least I got some pics of the cool looking exposures. After we returned from prospecting I decided to finish the day hunting the microsite where I started and spend some time at a channel deposit below which was also producing some solid finds (Another participant found a nice Acheroraptor tooth and a small theropod or bird claw there earlier) Center left: Myledaphus tooth A nice croc tooth. My last good find was a small section of theropod claw which I unfortunately did not get a pic of. Stay tuned because tomorrow we visit another Hell Creek ranch in North Dakota this time!
  5. I'm not a huge fan of large bones but here we go: a glimpse to mammalian fauna of California 7-12 million years ago. Video is from our Christmas break trip to South California/Nevada. My favorite was a rhino tooth.
  6. More teeth

    Since I have been having such good luck with tooth ID I thought I would dig in to some of my old collection. I got out my old bucket o teeth and found some that look like they were something other than bison or cow. I’ve put these in order from top to bottom. The first one is broken so I don’t know if there is enough there to ID. That one kind of looks like bison anyway. I have no idea on the last three. Found in Nebraska. Thanks for your help!
  7. Teeth found on a beach

    Hello, A few years ago me and my daughter found this tooth on the beach in the Netherlands. Since then we started to go regularly to several beaches to find washed off treasures. I though one of them was a horse tooth from the pleistocene...now i am not sure..it's too compact and short..i would love to have your expertise on it
  8. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/kangaroo-fossil-hop-australia-marsupial-balbarids-skeleton-research-study-a8764731.html
  9. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  10. Hallo everybody, I am searching for this osteological atlas: PALES, L. & LAMBERT, C., 1971 - Atlas Ostéologique pour servir à l'identification Des Mammifères du quarternaire - Les Membres Herbivores. Has anybody access to especially this volume? Many thanks, Thomas
  11. https://phys.org/news/2018-09-tiny-fossils-reveal-essential-successful.html https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6176315/Shrinking-helped-early-mammals-survive-200-million-years-ago.html
  12. Mesohippus bairdi formation?

    Hi guys, I recently acquired a piece of fossil Mesohippus teeth that apparently originated from the White River Badlands of South Dakota. The fossil however does not contain any info about what formation it came from. Does anyone have any idea as to what formation it could have come from?
  13. Pleistocene Fosssil Hunt!

    My girlfriend Ashley and I got out to hunt some Pleistocene sites a couple days ago. There are also Eocene sharks teeth mixed in. The rivers are all pretty high, so we went to some bank hunting sites I have found over the years. They definitely did not disappoint! We found a Tapir jaw section, horse tooth, some pretty big alligator teeth, and a variety of other fossils!
  14. Hello, I have been recently shopping around for fossil books that are more image heavy to look around at on my downtime, the few I have so far seem to be generally focused on all fossils and contain hardly any fossil vertebrates from the mesozoic or tertiary periods. Thus I am on the look out for any books that would be good fits, there was one I cannot remember the name for the life of me that I think is a large recent book that I've seen in B&N that goes over all time periods in full color with fossil photos/creature images, if anyone knows maybe which one that could be I was definitely on the lookout for it but any recommendations are awesome.
  15. The dealer has on hand are samples of the teeth of mammals and a pterosaurus teeth. Whether the identification was given correctly. In the future I want to buy these samples. Are they worthy of collection? Thanks.
  16. https://phys.org/news/2018-06-ancient-mammals-bolivia.html https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/cwru-usa062718.php
  17. I created this topic for anyone who wants an opinion from others on a potential purchase. Not regarding if the price right, because that’s totally up to you...I’m more concerned about quality, rarity, etc. Post here if you’re on the fence about anything. To kick it off, I’m gonna share what I came across....I’m not sure on the availability on such things like dino eggs meaning, “do I wait or purchase?” I know there are fakes, and I know the quality comes in all ranges...the detail in this particular shell is interesting.... question is, would you hold off and wait for something better, or would you purchase this bit of shell? Not crazy expensive anyway. A magnified Titanosaur argentinosaurus eggshell x4. I sent the seller more specific questions.
  18. Hi, I've just got back from one of my collecting trips to Bouldnor Cliff and picked up an odd mammal tooth crown that I was hoping I may be able to get some help with. The specimen constitutes part of the crown and the roots of an as of yet unidentified tooth (possibly molar?). What struck me about it upon picking it up is that the morphology of the tooth and it's roots do not resemble the usual (and common) dental material from Bothriodont anthracotheres which constitute the vast majority of mammal finds from the upper Hamstead Mbr. I've compared it to the Bothriodon teeth and jaws in my collection and can't find a match with either upper, lower or anterior dentition. The specimen (although partial) is also considerably bigger than the anthracothere teeth, so all in all I feel fairly secure in eliminating them as a possibility. I was wondering if it's possible this may be a piece of entelodont tooth. The Entelodontidae are represented in the upper Hamstead Mbr. by Entelodon magnum, although the material is restricted to isolated teeth and very rare. Unfortunately the occlusal surface is missing which makes it impossible to determine whether the tooth was bunodont or not, however the crown does seem to be quite "bulbous" at it's boundary with the roots, which is a feature I've seen in some entelodont teeth before. That said I don't want to rush to conclusions. If anyone has an experience with entelodont teeth or material and is able to help it would be much appreciated, as this would be a particularly exciting find! Thank you, Theo 1. Lateral view showing contact between crown and roots 2. Lateral view showing the surface where the tooth has been broken revealing inner dentine 3. Occlusal view 4. View of the partial roots on the underside of the specimen 4.
  19. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/23/science/haramiyid-skull-utah.html https://phys.org/news/2018-05-utah-fossil-reveals-global-exodus.html
  20. I've found a couple of listings of archaeocete teeth frags from Harleyville, South Carolina on a fossil seller. I know that Basilosaurus cetoides, Zygorhiza kochii, and Dorudon serratus all exist in this area, with a couple of examples of all three having been found there (now in Charleston Museum collection). However, is there a way to differentiate between them when it comes to teeth, specifically incisors? Some images of the listings are below. First tooth measures 2.6 inches. Second tooth measures 2.2 inches, but is a frag so I imagine that it may be much bigger if restored. Third tooth measures 3.75 inches.
  21. NALMA, SALMA, GABI

    FLYKOwswish this article has some bearing on the following issues: Mammal biochronology,the precise timing and/or speed of the G(reat)A(merican)B(iotic)I(nterchange),it contains some remarks on mammal taxa(however brief), magnetostratigraphic resolution from the Miocene to the Pleistocene, the closing of the Panama isthmus, and the possible diachroneity of mammal taxon appearances. There are NO taxa illustrated,and the authors' (infrequent)use of "heterochroneity " is unfortunate . If you have Woodburne(2012): this might be up your alley I liked it,but I'm weird that way
  22. Hi, It's been a while since I've put anything up on here so it figured it would a good time to share some of my finds from this spring so far. With such a productive winter the start of this spring on the Bouldnor Fm. coast was a bit slow with several trips in which little was found (odd for what is usually a heavily productive site) but as March and April came round the finds started coming in faster and better. Access at Bouldnor is now very dangerous and pretty much impassable due to thick and deep silt and mud which has covered part of the beach (which I found out the hard way trying to get through), along with two recent cliff falls which have brought several oak trees down onto the beach. Hamstead and Cranmore are as good as ever with a lot of the winter's mudflows now eroding away and making the foreshore a lot easier. (Hamstead Ledge on a spring low tide) Mammal finds have been pretty nice so far this spring, as usual all Bothriodon, and alongside them I've also made some nice alligator and turtle finds including two partial Emys in-situ in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. Here are some of the highlights: 1. More pieces of the large Bothriodon mandible I first found in January have turned up scattered over the same area. I now have part of the hinge, two sections with P2 - M3 and a part of the underside of the mandible from further forward. I regularly check the site on my collecting trips so hopefully yet more of the jaw will turn up. (The positions of the fragments may be slightly off in the image below but it gives a general idea) 2. Bothriodon caudal vertebra. This is one of my favourite finds from this spring. I was originally excavating a small micro-vertebrate site when I felt the tool make contact with a large bone, I dug a bit deeper into the clay and found this vertebra with the processes fragmented around it. Luckily with a bit of super glue the processes were easily reunited with the vertebral body, after 33 million years apart. Unfortunately I couldn't locate the other transverse process or neural spine in the matrix nearby so I think they may have been broken off on the Oligocene coastal plain. 3. Bothriodon upper molar in a fragment of maxilla 4. Section of Bothriodon mandible with a nice mental foramen. Unfortunately no in-situ teeth with this one. 5. Section of mammalian limb bone with evidence of rodent gnawing. This was an in-situ find eroding out of the Upper Hamstead Mbr. on the foreshore. Gnaw marks like these are really common on in-situ material especially on limb bones. I don't think the rodents were scavenging the flesh off the bones, more likely they were extracting calcium and phosphate or were simply using it to grind down their continually growing incisors. Either way it shows that for at least a period a lot of these bones were exposed to the elements and accessible to the variety of rodents present on the coastal plain. 6. Nice quality Bothriodon intermedial phalange 7. Large Diplocynodon alligator frontal bone Thanks for reading, and I hope you enjoyed the finds! Theo
  23. An afternoon on the Zandmotor

    Hi all, So on Tuesday afternoon, I was lucky enough to only have a half day of school. Seeing that the weather was nice, and that I had nothing else to do except go home, I decided to take the bus in the other direction, so to Kijkduin, in order to do some fossil hunting! I bought a sandwich and a chocolate bar at the Shell gas station, and set out on the beach. From the beach of Kijkduin I walked south, so towards the Zandmotor, while of course looking for fossils. View of the beach (mind that the sea is on the right side, on the left side it's just a small lagoon), with the haven of Rotterdam in the background. View of the beach with Kijkduin, and then Scheveningen, in the background. (Sorry for the blurriness...)
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