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Found 34 results

  1. Help with Fish jaw ID

    From the Meherrin River in NE North Csrolina. Local geology and preservation suffuse Plio-Pleistocene. I've eliminated tuna, grouper, wahoo, seabass, drum, sturgeon and tarpon. Im out of ideas. Thoughts?
  2. Mammal mandible IDs

    I have two mandibles from Asia probably Siberia that I need help IDing. #1 is a hair over 4" and the most complete tooth has a pointed premolar. #2 is 6 1/2" and all the teeth are complete besides the first molar. It looks very similar to some deer mandibles I have but the teeth are twice the height and half the width. Thank you for looking! #1
  3. Tooth and Mandible Identification

    Hi, I found this tooth and possibly the upper mandible in an arroyo in New Mexico in a place called Copper Canyon. It is about 5.5 miles from Ghost Ranch. The layer is most likely late triassic chinle formation but it's on a major fault. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  4. Raccoon mandible

    Found what I believe is a raccoon on mandible digging gravel in a creek Wauchula Florida today. The bone is heavier than I would expect for the size and has a very dark which color. not sure though if it's fossilized because the teeth have not turned that dark color yet. the bone matches the same color and size fossil deer antler peace from the same Creek found today. I have a new appreciation for the work that goes into Florida fossil hunting @jcbshark Although I'm sure it was much harder than it would have been had to come at the right time of year and not had to hunt in a creek that had knee to waist high water all day. The rest of the day's bounty is attached.
  5. prep of a great find

    Here some pictures of my FOTM prep. Unfortunely, I have no pictures of the skull prep. Only the mandible
  6. Echinocaris punctata.jpg

    From the album Northern's inverts

  7. Item 1: This has been suggested to be dire wolf or cat. Can we get more specific?
  8. Does anyone have any idea what it is?

    Hi dears colleagues!! I found this jaw fragment with 3 teeth. appear to be incisive and the mandibular fragment includes part of the mandibular symphysis.Does anyone have any idea what it is? Regards
  9. Reptilian or Mammalian?

    HiI've had this section of a mandible for a while. It was from a rock collection left under a house when tenants left. Think it's Mammalian, but possibly reptilian? Could use help to determine. Thanks.
  10. I found this in a creek bottom in central Ohio after a flood that caused extensive erosion. I'm thinking it might be a fox or coyote, but really don't know. I was hoping someone with more expertise in this area could assist me in identifying it. Thanks, Mark
  11. Hell Creek - Tiny jaw bones

    We were exploring the Hell Creek Formation in Montana, and found very similar sections of jaw bone. It seems like structurally, this section was the strongest and most likely to survive. As you can see, they are very small... Any idea on what these might have come from?? Thanks for any tips!
  12. domestic dog or coyote?

    This is not a fossil, but I brought it home any way from a river hunt. Is it domestic dog or coyote? I have looked at several images on line and cannot see a difference.
  13. Hello everyone! My name is Jack, and I am hoping one of you can help me out. To be clear, I have zero experience or knowledge when it comes to fossils. I absolutely loved dinosaurs when I was a kid, which led to my parents buying me this fossil of a partial mandible and teeth. I've starred at it ever since, always wondering what it might have been. I was cleaning out old boxes and I happen to find it! Last time I laid eyes on it was in the late 90's so I never had a chance to get it looked at. If there is anyone who would be able to give me some information on it, it would be fantastic. What kind of creature, what time period and quality of the sample etc.. any help would be greatly appreciated!
  14. The plesiosaur has long been one of my favorite prehistoric creatures of all, especially after reading tales of the Loch Ness Monster. I've always wanted a jaw from one, thankfully @StevenJDennis recently scouted this beauty for me from Tucson. I estimate roughly 30% restoration, mainly to the rear portion of the joint(?) and some filler. Also, majority of the teeth have been planted from Zarafasaura oceanis, another elasmosaur. Still, he's earned a spot as one of my showpiece fossils. He measures 17 inches long and 7 inches wide. Plesiosaur Mandible Elasmosauridae (Libonectes atlasense Buchy, 2005) 94.3 - 89.3 million years old | Turonian, late Cretaceous Akrabou Formation Asfla Village, Goulmima, Errachidia Province, Morocco I assume this is an erupting tooth
  15. I recently aquired this at a local shop in China. I'm assuming it's real (as there are many fakes), because of the weight and feel and the crystalization, where the tooth is broken. I'm not sure how to begin the fossil identification process. If you have any tips about the process of elimination, please let me know, I'm very curious about the date period and of course ID'ing what they would have belonged to. Thanks for your support!
  16. Small jaw secton with teeth

    From White River formation South Dakota. Has some appearance of Oreodont but it seems small.
  17. Hyracodon Jaw?

    New member, 1st post. Lifelong collector, recently re-enthused after finding this in South Dakota during a hunting trip. Take pity on the new guy and my first attempt at fossil photography. Would love to put a name to this!
  18. Found in western Washington state. Note the premaxillary tooth or tusk structure. Any identification help is appreciated. Thanks.
  19. Help with 2 "ice age" fossils

    Hi, 1st time post here, been collecting fossils like ammonites, chrinoids, trilobites etc for a while, but I came across a couple of fossils at a curio shop and was looking for help with ID, the owner of the shop found them near Whitby bay alongside other "ice age" fossils and estimated age at around 10,000BC. There is a large bone, around 13 inches in length and pretty thick and weighty, the best guess he could give me was part of an ox or bison leg, but curious if anyone can shed more light for me, would be interesting to know which bone and which animal The second one is clearly a mandible, he didn't give me any information but by looking appears to have belonged to a wild pig/boar, but not sure as it's not a complete jawbone, only about a 6 inch section and any more help would be great. Apologies for the pictures, had to take them on my phone and the camera isn't brilliant and have a few extras from different angles if people need. Many thanks for any light anyone can shed on them in advance.
  20. Xray of Hyaenodon mandibles

    From the album Badlands, Nebraska megafauna.

    The two associated Hyaenodon horridus mandibles from Nebraska puzzled me because they appear to be from an adult but when I removed some matrix i saw gaps for a molar and a tip of a tooth peeping out. I looked into it and it seems that the last molar doesn't reupt until age 3-4 so that is roughly the age of this animal. To verify, I asked a good mate to xray it. Th huge erupting molars are clearly see in the imagine. You can also clearly see the tooth roots below the crowns of the teeth and below the gum line (ie embedded into the bone). You can also clearly make out the mandibular canal (long dark line running ventrally below) the teeth - it's where the major veins, arteries and nerves of the bone run. Great view of millions of years old bone and teeth! Confirms that the teeth are erupting molars and gives me a great idea of the age. Not, quite juvenile, more like subadult.
  21. I have two associated Hyaenodon horridus mandibles from Nebraska. They puzzled me because they appear to be from an adult but when I removed some matrix is saw gaps for a molar and a tip of tooth peeping out. I looked into it and it seems that the last molar doesn't reupt until age 3-4 so that is roughly the age of this animal. To verify, I asked a good mate to xray it. You can clearly see the tooth roots below the crowns of the teeth and below the gum line (ie embedded into the bone). You can also clearly make out the mandibular canal (long dark line running ventrally (below) the teeth - it's where the major veins, arteries and nerves of the bone run. Great view of millions of years old bone and teeth! Confirms that the teeth are erupting molars and gives me a great idea of the age. Not, quite juvenile, more like subadult.
  22. Ursus spelaeus mandible.

    From the album Ursus spelaeus (Cave Bear) collection.

    Huge Ursus spelaeus (Cave Bear) left mandible. From Mixnitz, Steiermark, Austria. The "Drachenhöhle", or " Dragons Cave".
  23. Ursus spelaeus mandible.

    From the album Ursus spelaeus (Cave Bear) collection.

    Huge Ursus spelaeus (Cave Bear) left mandible. From Mixnitz, Steiermark, Austria. The "Drachenhöhle", or " Dragons Cave".
  24. Cave Bear jaw

    From the album Ursus spelaeus (Cave Bear) collection.

    Ursus spelaeus jaw (mandible) from the Austrian Dachstein Mountains. No teeth left sadly.
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