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Found 1,326 results

  1. Sharktooth Hill Whale Vertebra

    Earlier this summer I had a chance to dig at Slow Curve at Ernst Quarries. A few teeth were found along with a small dolphin vertebra, but the best find was this large whale(?) vertebra I pulled out as the rain clouds were quickly approaching. From my internet research, I believe it is a whale lumbar vertebra, but that is all I could determine. Whatever it is, I feel lucky to have found it and want to know as much as I can about it! Is there any chance to pin down anything more specific about this piece, such as species? Ideally, I would like to reconstruct the broken processes and make a display. Are there any collections of images for whale vertebrae that could also help with identification? (I couldn't find any good sources while searching) Am I correct in thinking the two parallel broken processes in the second image were the top (dorsal?) of the bone? Is it possible to tell which way the bone faced toward the head and tail originally? I appreciate any help that you guys and gals can provide! Each of the photos has a US quarter, Euro, and centimeter scale for reference. (I first tried photos with lights on both sides, but then the shape of the vertebra was very difficult to see.)
  2. Scallop

    From the album Virginia Miocene

    Chesapectin nefrens Westmoland County, VA Choptank Formation Middle Miocene C. nefrens is fairly common in the Choptank Formation, but the level of sculptural detail preserved in this particular specimen just blew me away when I gently brushed off the loose sediment.
  3. Scallop

    From the album Virginia Miocene

    Chesapectin nefrens Westmoland County, VA Choptank Formation Middle Miocene C. nefrens is fairly common in the Choptank Formation, but the level of sculptural detail preserved in this particular specimen just blew me away when I gently brushed off the loose sediment.
  4. First attempt!

    Went to Virginia a few months ago and came home with a few Chesapectin nefrens encased in solid rock. This one was only exposed as a ring of shell material in a ball of clay, calcite, iron ,broken shell and who knows what else. Normally I prep things with soft brushes, dental picks, a water pick, and very gentle fingers. That wasn't cutting it this time and I had to get aggressive. I spent 3+ hours with a rotary tool and zero practice. It's no museum piece, but it's not horrible. I could simply collect the same species, from the same member of the same formation, at a much closer spot, where the matrix is much looser, but I gotta learn sometime. Suggestions for next time?
  5. First attempt!

    Went to Virginia a few months ago and came home with a few Chesapectin nefrens encased in solid rock. This one was only exposed as a ring of shell material in a ball of clay, calcite, iron ,broken shell and who knows what else. Normally I prep things with soft brushes, dental picks, a water pick, and very gentle fingers. That wasn't cutting it this time and I had to get aggressive. I spent 3+ hours with a rotary tool and zero practice. It's no museum piece, but it's not horrible. I could simply collect the same species, from the same member of the same formation, at a much closer spot, where the matrix is much looser, but I gotta learn sometime. Suggestions for next time?
  6. Fossil Hunt 6/22/19

    It's been a long while since I was able to fossil hunt. To go out today with a decent haul really made it rewarding. The location was on a private beach, and the weather was perfect. A bit of wind, around 78-80, warm water, and clear skies made the beach beautiful. We hunted for around two hours on the South side with minimal rewards, some really small teeth such as hemis, makos, and the like. The hunting started to pick up when we made our way over to the North Side. As soon as we arrived, a hemi around 1 1/6 washed up. I knew I was going to like this beach when a second only a little smaller washed up after a minute of hunting. We worked the beach for another hour, pulling a mako of around 1 1/4 inches (broken root) from the surf, and then another, really nice 1 inch mako in the same spot. We met a certain Steve Grossman on the beach, who invited me to the Calvert Marine Museum's sharkfest to help him set up, talk about, and look at his hundreds of megs. If any of you MD folks show up, i'll be there! The Beach
  7. Sm Shark Teeth

    I am sifting with a 1/4 sieve in a layer of what I think is original ocean bottom (Florida). I found 2 small teeth that I thought were Mako and Sandtiger, but now I think neither is correct. The darker tooth without a pronounced nutrient grove is C. hastalis found years ago in the Peace River. Additional photos of Shark tooth #1 Additional photo of Shark tooth #2
  8. rapp beach hunting

    Finally had a nice day at the beach, very early low tide, light breeze, manageable surf, clear visibility. Yet I found next to nothing. The highlight was a nice coprolite burrow, in great shape. I was reduced to picking up sea shells (don't know if the one shown is even a fossil, but don't see many of this type). Few teeth. Nothing big, but there's always that chance! Perfect conditions BUT we have not had a good storm from the north to blow stuff up on this southern exposure beach in a month. There were few oyster shells visible and the debris was mostly black wood and pieces of iron (probably from 300 years of boats/ships). I'm a pack rat so also picked up some 'whale" bone and a weird little bone (?)- like piece that I need to examine more closely. I'm guessing I need a new spot until the crowds thin out and the weather shifts from the north. October?
  9. Symphyseal

    Picked this up yesterday. It is easy to get excited on a small package. Looks like G. aduncus symphyseal but is much wider than the ones I see on a google search.
  10. Diaphorocetus redescribed

    A new fossil sperm whale-related paper is available online: Florencia Paolucci, Mónica R. Buono, Marta S. Fernández, Felix G. Marx & José I. Cuitiño (2019) Diaphorocetus poucheti (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Physeteroidea) from Patagonia, Argentina: one of the earliest sperm whales Journal of Systematic Palaeontology DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2019.1605544 Curious to see if anyone has a copy of this paper, because Diaphorocetus along with Idiorophus is one of the earliest sperm whales known in the fossil record.
  11. Proposal to mine fossil-rich site in New Zealand sparks campaign to protect it https://phys.org/news/2019-06-fossil-rich-site-zealand-campaign.html http://theconversation.com/proposal-to-mine-fossil-rich-site-in-new-zealand-sparks-campaign-to-protect-it-118505 Scientist: maar not only 'outstanding' site By John Gibb, Otago Daily times https://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/scientist-maar-not-only-outstanding-site https://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/council-now-formally-opposed-expansion-mine Foulden Maar - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foulden_Maar Yours, Paul H.
  12. rapp creek hunting

    A little under the weather (and having truck trouble) but took a break for a few hours hoping to find more shrimp coprolites after recent thunderstorms. Humid, but not particularly hot, lots of frogs. Despite lots of digging in last week's spot, not much mixed in the gravel, mostly small broken stuff (one vert, one angel shark tooth, some drum teeth). I always wonder if I am 'mining' an area of the stream bed that was picked over 30 years ago. Finally found a mottled tiger shark tooth, relatively rare on that site. I have some small pieces drying but no strong suspicions of shrimp coprolites. Before leaving I hit an older spot which has been good for cowshark teeth. First screening found a broken ecphora, a pretty rootless cowshark tooth and a broken cowshark tooth. On the way out checked two other spots, maybe next week?
  13. This weekend I went again to the Baltic Sea coast. This time my target were Miocene deposits of lignite in the cliffs around Chłapowo. This is one of the cliffs I climbed in vain: because the only thing I found has nothing to do with Miocene - it is a piece of a crinoid stem, so most probably Silurian.
  14. Hello everyone! I found this bone last summer at the aurora fossil festival in North Carolina. and I have not found anything like it before. I need everyone’s help on this one. It looks like a skull to me but I have no idea. Thanks for the help!
  15. So I found this bone in miocene area where I normally hunt for sharks teeth, this was found in a big gravel bed where I was finding turtle shell pieces, dugong bones, a few sharks teeth here and there, part of a big vert that ill post later, as well as many bone parts that I can't identify. However this bone is the most interesting thing I have pulled from this spot. At first I thought it was dugong because that's most of what I find. But then I noticed it was hollow in the shaft of the bone making me question what it could be because as far as I know the only things with hollow bones are birds. Any and all help would be amazing because I am lost. Ps: I'm sorry the colors are so blown out. I raised the exposure on the images because the fossil is so dark it was hard to see details in the pictures.
  16. Fossil Vertebra ID

    Hi all, I was going through the haul of Amelia Island shark teeth that I collected as a kid, and I found a vertebra that I had forgotten about among the teeth. Its quite small, maybe half a centimeter the long way. I'm pretty sure the thing is roughly Miocene aged along with the rest of the fossils that show up on Amelia beaches (Although my understanding is that they are pulled up through dredging so I could be completely wrong!). Its pretty heavily weathered from the ocean so I'm not expecting a miracle here, but I'd love to learn a bit more about my (re)discovery!
  17. Ray barb or teeth

    This piece is .45" long. Barbs/teeth on one side only @ .025" tall & .025" pitch. The opposite side of the teeth is not damaged and show no evidence of teeth or barbs. Can anyone give me some clues as to what this might be?
  18. Tiger Shark Tooth Australia

    G'day everyone! I was wondering if anyone could give me a second opinion on this shark tooth. It was collected from the Batesford Limestone, Early Miocene in Age (23 - 15 million years). Fossils that come from this locality include shark teeth, fish teeth, cetacean fossils, avian and terrestial mammal fossils and marine invertebrates. I believe it could be Galeocerdo aduncus however I am not that confident as I don't collect shark teeth much and am not familiar with shark teeth from this locality. Thanks, Dan
  19. Possible megalodon tooth in NJ?

    The grey tooth on the right is a small posterior megalodon tooth found in the peace river Florida. The copper tooth was found in a very shallow creek part of big brook NJ. Is it possible that a meg could have swam farther north like modern great whites do during a split time when the water level overlapped the big brook area and dropped it? I’m still new at identifying teeth but they seem VERY very similar
  20. Trip to Batesford Quarry

    G'day Everyone! Yesterday my dad and I were lucky to visit Batesford Quarry in Geelong, Victoria. The fossils here are miocene in age from the Batesford Limestone. Fossils foudn here consist of sharks teeth, cetacean fossils, rare bird and terrestial mammal material and invertebrate fossils, mainily echinoderms. Batesford Quarry is one of the places my dad and I have been wanting to go to for many years due to it's high concentration of vertebrate fossils compared to other Victorian fossil sites (Mostly Shark Teeth). We arrived at the Quarry around 8:30 AM and spent the next 6 hours searching the spoil piles for sharks teeth. Due to the heavy rain the past few days, the sharks teeth were harder to find as the sand was wet and hard to seive and see the elsuive teeth. However my dad and I came home with a good haul, collecting a total of 28 sharks teeth, a nice fish tooth plate and numerous invertebrate fossils. I am not the best at IDing shark teeth so any help will be greatly appreciated Thanks for reading! The Shark Teeth Haul Grey Nurse Shark? (Carcharias taurus) Isurus? Rare Galeocerdo Dan
  21. Went out to the beach, water was up and dirty, wind had been from east pushing tide up into the river, and the moon wasn't creating a low tide. At least I got some exercise, and a sunburnt neck and shoulder, and a dozen nondescript sand tiger teeth, small, no cusps, beaten. Decided to try a Rapp creek in the woods. Kids had been active over the Holiday weekend. A good sign that they are interested, people have been hunting roughly the same spots for over 50 years. Lots of frogs out, water low, HOT but while more humid than the beach and no breeze, some shade from the sun. Worked two spots for over two hours. More gravel and rocks than the more usual shell bits and sand, hoped for some bigger teeth but about the same as usual. No angel shark teeth and only a few drum teeth (maybe I missed them?) Only one vert, some skate teeth, a few glossy steinkern pieces, some "whale" bone and Tilly bones, lots of sand tiger spikes, a few gray , requiem and lemon shark teeth and possibly some small non-serrated mako? (broken). Finally found a cowshark tooth, hadn't found any in a month? Fun trip.
  22. Does anyone have a copy of the paper "Cetotheres from the early Middle Miocene Bihoku group inShobara District, Hiroshima prefecture, West Japan"? I know the paper is too big to upload, but I wanted sections of the paper that describe Hibacetus, Parietobalaena yamaokai, and Diorocetus shobarensis because no one has had the chance to place Hibacetus in a phylogenetic context.
  23. Dermal denticles

    Originally from the Midwest, I've been hunting for fossils for about 50 years and found about two "fossilized sea shells". And this was not from a lack of trying! I moved to Summerville, SC about three years ago for a job that included lots of travel. Now that travel is finished and meeting new friends in the area, I have connected with some kids that stumbled onto something that I think is big! Had I grown up in Summerville, I probably would have change my career to paleontology instead of Electrical Engineering. I am amazed at the finds here in my home town. I have taken my wife and kids including their friends to a spot that allows them to find Shark teeth (at a minimum) within 2 minutes of arriving to an area. My dilemma, I would like to know what these type of "dermal denticles" are. For every 20 shark teeth I find, I find one of these. Please refer to the attached pics. Thanks Matt
  24. Hello everyone! I have been a fossil hunter for two years now and wanted to share just some of my favorite finds so far! All were found in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. Thanks for looking!
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