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Found 1,780 results

  1. I went out on a fossil hunt last Thursday to one of the streams I like to hunt at. It was only around 28 degrees F when I arrived so I didn't have the highest hopes. I ended up having my best day both quality and quantity wise! I found my first New Jersey hemi as well as my first tiger shark tooth. Also found a really nice sized sand tiger as well as one that would have been a monster if it was whole. Hope you guys enjoy!!
  2. Whatisit Marine fossil

    Last Thursday, found a bunch of reef type fossils in the Peace River... Sort while watching the NFL today. Here are a few of the smaller items: A ray denticle, a tapir cap, cypress wood, and ....
  3. Hey everyone! i was wondering If I could get your opinion on two things with this tooth. 1)does this look like It was found in a BV, golden beach, Etc. location? 2)I had someone suggest that this may be a transitional GW, due to the fact that the serrations are uneven, and get larger, and smaller depending on where you look, even though the serrations don’t seem damaged.
  4. BoneValleyTooth

    I am on an amazing win streak. Last Friday, I found a very unusual Barnacle fossilized in Silica. Next time out , today!!!! I have been hunting Bone Valley for 13 years and I have never found or seen this tooth. I do not know what it is..... and I broke it digging it out. The root was already broken some many MYAs, but it still does not feel good breaking a once in a lifetime find. My good fortune continued because the broken segment was also in the sieve.. My only thought is that it might be marine mammal. Asking @Boesse and @Harry Pristis to take a look...
  5. Virginia Turritella ID Help

    On a recent fossil outing, I visited a large shell bed in a creek near Williamsburg, VA that I read to be of the Late Miocene Cobham Bay Member, Eastover Formation. Many of the fossils we found seemed to confirm that this site is Miocene age. We found Chesapecten middlesexensis, Isognomon sp., Glycymeris sp., Ostrea compressirostra, Lirophora sp. However, we also found these three Turritella shell fragments. They measure about 2-3cm in length. I thought these shells looked very similar to the Turritella alticostata posted by @sixgill pete from the Yorktown Fm of NC or the Turritella alumensis posted by @MikeR from the Jackson Bluff Formation of FL. The issue though is that both of these species are from the Pliocene. Turritella plebia is supposedly the species found in the Miocene Eastover Formation, but these shells don't look to be T. plebia. I would normally say that these are probably loose finds from the Yorktown Formation that got mixed in with the other Eastover Formation fossils, but these fossils were found in situ and in layers below those that I found the Isognomon sp. shells. If these were Pliocene aged, I would normally expect that they would be located above the Miocene Isognomon shells. I was wondering if someone might be able to solve my confusion. Perhaps these shells are of a third Turritella species that I am not aware of or perhaps the species I referenced above were not limited to the Pliocene. Alternatively this site could not be of the Miocene Eastover Formation and I am just very confused. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you!
  6. My Best Megalodon Tooth Yet!

    Hi everyone! This is my first post here on the forum in what feels like forever. I'd like to be active here again, and thought there was no better way to kick it off than showcasing my meg tooth! Some of you may have already seen the tooth on my Instagram, Facebook, or YouTube, but I wanted to make a post on here as well. I found the tooth last week along Calvert Cliffs. It's approximately 4.1" slant height and in near perfect condition. It even has that iconic Calvert Blue color on the crown that I love so much! I've been dreaming about finding a tooth like this ever since I started collecting a few years ago, and my dream has finally come true! Check out the pictures below and the YouTube video if you'd like to see how I found it. Hopefully the first of many great finds this year!
  7. Flag Ponds MD Fossil ID

    Found this on the beach today at Flag Pond Nature Park in MD, known for Miocene era fossils. Any ideas? Thanks!
  8. Great Day at Matoaka

    Recently, I haven't been having tremendous luck along the Calvert Cliffs, but I headed down to Matoaka Beach again yesterday and was rewarded with one of my best fossil hunts to date! I arrived around 10am, a couple of hours before low tide, and the Chesapeake Bay was as still as I've ever seen it in the year since I started fossil hunting. A little wave action can often be helpful to kick up fossils, so from the top of the cliffs I wasn't expecting much. But as it turned out, the water was extremely clear, which helped me find more submerged fossils than I usually find, and there were extensive exposed shell and gravel beds along the beach. Here's my first shark tooth find of the day--nothing out of the ordinary, but a good condition Carcharhinus sp. Less than an hour in, I found this nice whale tooth (my best so far) tumbling at water's edge. When you find a trip maker early on, it's a good day. And then I found a Meg (or probably a Chub)! It's missing most of the root and part of the right side, but this is my best one to date. The Meg was soon followed by this huge Hemi. It has a bit of root erosion but still-sharp serrations and measures over 1.4" -- roughly the same size as the biggest Hemi I've found to date. I love when there's a big ol' shark tooth just waiting for you on top of the sand. More to follow...
  9. What shark tooth is this?

    I found this tooth a few years back collecting at Stratford hall on the tour (it was a great day) and now that I look at it twice it doesn’t look like any of my makos that I ah e in my collection and believe me, I have a lot of makos. So that brings me to ask, what exactly is it? It’s about 1 1/4 inches long and I have lower makos but they don’t look like this. Here’s some photos I hope I can get to the bottom of this!
  10. Peace River Oddity

    I went hunting today in my favorite place -- the Peace River. The day was gorgeous, Sunshine, 70s and I had a 5 mm wetsuit. The river is down (quickly 2-3 feet). Someone upstream closed the locks of a lake or something similar this last week. I was in an area that I had not hunted in years, but I recalled some of the landscape and tried a few of my old spots. Pretty good , but not great. Some nice Hemis, but small shark teeth were few. Found a horse ear bone, a small armadillo scute, a very small canine, but they came slowly, so I move trying lots of different locations. The last one gave me some curious finds and this was the most unusual. I kept on turning it over and over, wondering what it was.... rock, crystal?, or some sort of calcification like the Calcite clams from Rucks Pit. What happened to this odd fossil? So the 1st 4 photos kept me confused, but an old friend was exposed on photo #5. At 2.25 inches, the pattern on the shiny part is definitive. Enjoy.
  11. Please help to identify

    I am a novice so please excuse my photos. It has nice enamel, 1” long, half of root missing
  12. Mako shark tooth

    From the album Fossil collection

    Beautiful Mako shark tooth from the Portuguese Miocene
  13. Isurus (Mako Shark)

    From the album Fossil collection

    Isurus (Mako Shark) from the Miocene, Portugal
  14. Free Access pdf link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/08912963.2020.1861608?needAccess=true Shimada, K., Bonnan, M. F., Becker, M. A., Griffiths, M. L. (2021). Ontogenetic growth pattern of the extinct megatooth shark Otodus megalodon—implications for its reproductive biology, development, and life expectancy. Historical Biology. Abstract: The extinct megatooth shark, Otodus megalodon (Lamniformes: Otodontidae), is known primarily from its gigantic teeth in the late Neogene marine fossil record. It is known to reach at least 14.1‒15.3 m in length, but its reproductive biology and ontogenetic growth pattern have remained largely in the realm of speculation. Here, we examined incremental growth bands in fossil vertebrae of a 9.2-m-long individual O. megalodon, revealing that the shark was born large, 2 m in length, and died at age 46. This large size at birth is characteristic of lamniform sharks and is indicative of live-bearing reproduction along with embryos’ intrauterine cannibalism behaviour in the form of oophagy. The trajectory of the generated growth curve beyond the age of death and the maximum length (about 15 m) calibrated from the largest known teeth of O. megalodon suggest that the species had a lifespan of at least 88–100 years with an average growth rate of about 16 cm/yr at least for the first 46 years. As one of the largest carnivores that ever existed on Earth, deciphering such growth parameters of O. megalodon is critical to understand the role large carnivores play in the context of the evolution of marine ecosystems.
  15. Calvert Cliffs Vert-Terrestrial Mammal?

    Hi all, Something different for today. I discovered this vertebra in the surf at Matoaka Cabins roughly 2 years ago. For those of you that don’t know, the rocks here are Miocene in age and preserve a nearshore marine environment. Cetacean remains are common, but other mammals (esp terrestrial) are not. Originally I thought it was a turtle vert, but now I’ve realized that it’s mammalian and possibly terrestrial in origin. It passed the burn test, by the way. My thought is that it is from a small mammal’s tail, as it closely resembles other mammalian caudal vertebrae. I’ve included a diagram of the vertebrae of Phenacodus, which show marked similarity. It’s not from Phenacodus, though as the deposits are far too young. Does anyone have any ideas on a better or more specific id? I’m not well versed in Cenozoic mammals. Thanks in advance.
  16. Squalodon tooth?

    Hello, Looking for help identifying this one. Portugal, Miocene. Thanks, Ricardo
  17. Sand tiger shark tooth

    From the album Fossil collection

    Sand tiger shark tooth
  18. Hemipristis serra

    From the album Fossil collection

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) from the Portuguese Miocene
  19. Melodon majori?

    this is a follow up from a previous post. the dog like lower jaw bone pics.
  20. Meg tooth

    From the album Fossil collection

    Megalodon tooth from the Algarve miocene
  21. Mini Meg

    From the album Fossil collection

    Mini Meg tooth from the Algarve Miocene
  22. A windy chilly day on the Potomac at Stratford Hall in Virginia, but some good finds for me. Two megs in the same patch of gravel! Admittedly one is a broken mess and the other is a tiny posterior, but a thrill to find. Makos, hemi’s , and a little thresher ( I think) rounded out the haul.
  23. Potomac tooth ID?

    I found both of these on the Potomac in a unique site with Paleocene Eocene AND Miocene exposures. I was not able to identify them, does anyone know what they could be?
  24. Shark tooth with matrix

    From the album Fossil collection

    Shark tooth (Carcharodon hastalis?) from the Algarve Miocene
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