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Found 1,707 results

  1. Calvert County Trip

    Took a trip down to Calvert County this past weekend and did some searching around the Matoaka Cabins and just outside of Flag Ponds Park. Think I did pretty well for a two day search!
  2. Here is a brief report from one of our latest forays into Calvert County, MD. The well-known stretch of shoreline along the western Chesapeake Bay is loaded with Miocene fossils, with the Calvert, St. Mary's, and Choptank formations progressively exposed along a ~24 mile stretch of beach and cliffs. We found an Airbnb in Lusby, MD which was not too far from Matoaka Lodges, which seemed the best bet since the nearly 2 mile walk to the beaches at Calvert Cliffs State Park is impractical for our family at this time. Covid-19 and Maryland's onerous private land regulations can make it tough if not impossible to access some of the other municipal beaches along the coast. For example, Brownies Beach, Dares Beach, Cove Point, and Flag Pond are all restricted in some way to town or county residents only. Matoaka Lodges however will grant day-pass access for a small fee, and the beach is from my experience very diverse and productive in its fossils. We spent a total of 5 hours there, employing an 1/8" sieve and also simply walking the surf line. The largest tooth pictured here actually washed up at my feet as I was surreptitiously bending over at the same time. Most of the rest were found with the sieve. Most of these are shark or sting ray teeth and a few turtle shells plus some of the smaller items I could not identify. A local told me that porpoise teeth can be found there also. This lot comprises the smallest fossils found; in addition to these (mostly) teeth and shell fragments were found a large and diverse sample of vertebrate fragments, corals, miscellaneous other fossils (snails, mollusks, etc.) which I will post in the follow-up report to this one. Having spent some time at some of the other sites along Calvert Cliffs this summer, I would say based on the diversity, number of fossils, and time spent collecting, that Matoaka is definitely worth the return trip.
  3. Fossil identification

    I found this tooth today at my usual spot at in Summerville SC and I found this tooth amongst the sharks teeth that was very strange to me. The most similar thing online I’ve seen to it is squalodon due to the wrinkly enamel, accessory cusps, and two roots. However, they seem to be extremely rare or nonexistent in this region. I would love to hear any thoughts or opinions on the ID of this tooth. Thank you on advance!
  4. In situ

    From the album Fossil Collection

  5. Shark vertebra

    From the album Fossil Collection

  6. Croc tooth

    From the album Fossil Collection

  7. Chunkosaurus challenge

    I wasn’t even going to post this one up but it does have some unique features so I thought I would give it a shot. Any guesses?
  8. Odd tiny vert need ID

    No idea what this is from but it is in really nice shape and completely fossilized. North central Nebraska. Miocene
  9. Bear-Dog Fossils

    I just acquired these fossils from the fossil fair at the sanford civic center in central florida, these are all allegedly from the Cynelos genus of bear-dogs. The tag on these specimens reads: "Cyenlos carnoiavorus fossil bear-dog tibia, femur, cervical vertebrae early miocene epoch thomas farm site chilchrist co. florida." Here's the tibia. (measurements in cm) I have another bear-dog specimen ready for an ID, but it is a different genus and comes from a different area, so I will just show the specimens I purchased from the suwanee river. Femur: Cervical Vertebrae:
  10. Hello everyone! Just got home from my weekly vacation and started immediately the preparation. The matrix is soft, mostly loose sandstone and once wet you can process it easier. Right now I have no power tools, only some screw drives and picks. The process seems that will take a lot of time. Any advice is welcome. I also need advice concerning some issues. 1. One urchin that after making it wet, a crack was revealed. There is possibility that the crack expanded by half millimeter. How I treat that? Naturally dry it and application of 20% paraloid? Then proceed as above? 2. Another sample has a small piece broken, which of course I collected. The broken piece has some matrix on it and is less than 2cm. Again paraloid and then same process? 3. The drying process can be accelerated with sunlight or this might be dangerous and may cause cracks? Thanks everyone. The first pic is the one I am working now. It was like a sandball before removing most of the matrix and now I am doing detailing. The second is the slightly cracked at 11 o'clock. The white side was exposed in the weather, the rest was within sandstone wall in the quarry.
  11. Borophagus Carnassial

    Just got back from the fossil fair at Sanford Civic Center in central Florida, had a great time and brought back some great specimens. There's quite a variety here, but I have quite specific geographic/geological data for each piece, so I'm excited for some opinions. After some careful deliberation, I've decided to make separate posts for each specimen, as I want to thoroughly inspect each piece rather than half-haphazardly glance over all of them. The tag with this fossil reads exactly: "Osteoborus cyonoides Late Miocene- "Hemphillian Ogallala Group Hemphill Co. Texas 'Coffee Ranch Fauna'" Apparently Osteoborus is a synonymous taxon for Borophagus. How does the tag hold up? Thank you very much for your time, much appreciated. NOTE: ruler is in cm, this tooth is quite small.
  12. ID help on Shark Tooth

    I thought at first it might have been a small lower hemi but the more I looked at pictures, it also looked like it could be a symphyseal tooth. It is hard to see in the pictures but there are faint serrations on the tooth closer to the root. This was found near the Scientist Cliffs area of Calvert Cliffs. Thank you in advance!
  13. Hi everyone I just ordered some more microfossil matrix samples, most of which are rich in shark teeth. But I would like to know what to expect from the matrix, which means I am looking for websites of pdf's which describe the species from those locations. The first is from Lee Creek Mine, Yorktown Formation, Aurora, North Carolina (Miocene), I did find an ID section of Lee Creek teeth on elasmo.com but it wasn't extremely extensive. The second sample is a shark tooth rich Limestone Block (which still needs to be disolved) from the Mesaverde Formation, Rollings Member, Colorado (Cretaceous). If anyone has some pdf's of info sheets that could help with ID'ing the finds, I would be more than grateful! Thank you in advance!
  14. Carcharhinus priscus (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    Slant length 9mm. Upper lateral Burdigalian, Miocene Obere Meeresmolasse Formation From the NW Lake of Constance area.
  15. Carcharhinus priscus (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    Root length 1cm. Lower lateral Burdigalian, Miocene Obere Meeresmolasse Formation From the NW Lake of Constance area.
  16. ID request Kythera island

    Hello everyone. I was collecting in an abandoned sand quarry in the Greek island of Kythera. The formation is Tortonian - Zanglean made of various hardness/density sandstone. The upper layer looks like river deposits as it has more round pebbles and its thickness is less than a metre. The main formation exceeds 8m. North of this place (800m) and south of it (1000-1200m) there are confirmed Miocene deposits, terrestrial and river origin. I am clueless with this. 2€ coin = 1inch I thought of mammal tooth but I have no idea of such things. My other thought, it is just a rock..
  17. Anteater, elephant fossils dating back 9 million years found in SW Turkey Anadolu Agency, Daily Sabah Geraads, D., 2017. Late Miocene large mammals Mahmutgazi, Denizli province, Western Turkey. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie- Abhandlungen, 284(3), pp.241-257. Abstract of Geraads (2017) Yours, Paul H.
  18. I found this one at my site in the Miocene Burdigalian and was wondering if anyone could tell me if this tooth is pathological.
  19. Just another day in Paradise

    I was out hunting with yesterday. Intermittent clouds and sunshine. Usually when I hunt fossils, it is humid and hot with mosquitoes and horse flies dive bombing you. Yesterday, the temps were mild, humidity gone and it was actually chilly at times in cool water at 75 degrees. distressed My hunting partner was doing well, finding distressed Megs and (mostly broken) 3_toed teeth. I was finding almost nothing. A lot of broken small shark teeth, combined with broken bones, and a modern tusk from a small wild hog. In times like these , I keep the more interesting broken bones: Here are the results of 6 hours of moving gravel yesterday: As I said,not that impressive!!! 11 whole small shark teeth, broken bones that might be rocks. A modern pig tusk. We get many new fossil hunters who think they have a fossil, but it turns out to be a concretion or rock or... I kept 5 larger "bones" that I thought could be fossils rather than rocks... So a little quiz... Is it bone or is it rock. A little extra credit if you say bone and can actually Identify it. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) By the way, the day picked up in the final 10 minutes. Both muscles and ligaments in my back were screaming bloody murder, we had the return to the truck to deal with and a very worn tooth fell into my screen... You can see it in lower right. This is a horse tooth, and by size and design , it must be Nannippus. I love little horse teeth, especially those I do not recognize! To see this with my eyes, let me show a Nannippus peninsulatus I found 4 years ago. You see all those little squigglies ? They are named "Plications". This peninsulatus is likely 4-8 mya, so middle miocene. As Nannippus type horses go back in time, the number and complexity of Plications decrease. This new tooth from yesterday has almost no Plication complexity. It must be really old!!!! I'll get a reading on what this tooth is, and let you know. 10 minutes left... You never know what you might find.
  20. Finally getting around to posting about my recent trip to Stratford Cliffs in Virginia with the Maryland Natural History Society. It was a lot of fun, found some cool stuff, and met some nice people. Here are pictures of some of the finds I took home!
  21. Skull I. D. Maryland

    Found this skull in a cliff in southern Maryland. Was dug out of grey clay in small cliff. Looks to be a Boar skull? Any ideas to the age?Miocene?
  22. Notorhynchus primigenius (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    Almost complete lateral 18mm. long Burdigalian, Miocene, Obere Merresmolasse Formation (OMM) From the Lake of Constance area, Germany
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