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Found 673 results

  1. Mosasaurus or Something Else?

    Please help identity. Is this a mosasaur or something else? This tooth was found of the WM Browning Cretaceous Fossil park. This is shaped somewhat different than other mosasaur that I have found at the park (more slender and recurved). For example, this looks much different than the pterygoid tooth in my collection. Thanks for your insight.
  2. Mosasaur Pterygoid

  3. Short hunt at the North Sulphur River Texas. Lots of mosasaur bones.
  4. Fun day on the North Sulphur River Texas. We saw some cool wildlife. Here's my finds. A nice mix of pleisosaur, mosasaur, enchodus, shark, turtle, horse, coprolite and artifacts.
  5. Mosasaur, Plesiosaur or Spinosaur

    Purchased from online. Morocco fossil. Are they Mosasaur, Plesiosaur, Spinosaur or other species? Need help for ID, Thanks!
  6. NJ Cretacous Whose tooth is this?

    NJ Cretacous hunt today, found this tooth in a deep sift. Has a tiny bit of enamel left on it. Any ideas? Its about 1-1/2 inches long.
  7. fossil teeth in matrix mystery

    I have this piece, which sadly I do not know much about, being that it was acquired at an estate sale and had no info. I have not been able to find something similar looking online, except for maybe a small section of teeth from a helicoprionid shark? The piece is about 6 x 7" and the teeth(?) are about 1/2" in length.
  8. I have heard that it's not uncommon to find examples of the ammonite placenticeras meeki with evidence of supposed mosasaur predation marks. A certain example of mine has since stood out as a possible contender. This example comes from deposits of the late Campanian Bearpaw Formation, a unit that is already well known for its good preservation of late Cretaceous molluscs, including placenticeras meeki with the supposed predation marks. I know that there are competing theories about the origin of these marks, including abrasion by limpets or other gastropods, so I'm curious about whether any of you are in agreement that this conspicuous pattern is evidence that this particular placenticeras was chomped by a mosasaur. A note about the specimen - I somewhat foolishly decided that a fine grain sandpaper was the solution for getting rid of the stubborn bits of sandstone matrix and pyrite that clung to the nacre, so most of the surface, including the rims of the matrix filling the puncture holes, is slightly polished. Also unfortunate is the fact that this ammonite, on account of most of the internal chambers being completely hollow, smashed into hundreds of little pieces once the concretion containing it was split. Fitting these fragments back together is essentially impossible, and I'm regretful that the specimen was ruined slightly by not being extracted carefully enough, but thankfully there's still a significant amount of it that's still intact. If anything, it seems to be telling that the only part of the fossil that isn't hollow (and therefore more durable) is where the puncture holes are, given that these holes would have allowed water and sediment to enter the chambers they had breached. The chambers which did not fill with matrix, on the other hand, could not handle the stress of the concretion being split, and shattered. Anyway, the first photo here shows the first two holes. These are on the left side of the ammonite. Note that the nacre around the punctures is cracked, where otherwise it is smooth and unblemished. The right side, showing the third puncture hole. It is difficult to tell in the photo, but this hole is depressed slightly into the ammonite. The bit near the end of the tape measure could also be a hole, but it's difficult to tell with so much pyrite encrusting it. Finally, a front-facing view. I've added arrows to approximate the location of the holes on either side. Note the preservation of the nacre of the septum, and how much of it is still covered by pyrite. Note that the other end of the fossil has no obvious septa, leading me to believe that this fragment is from near the body chamber. So, thoughts? I know that the origin of this type of trace fossil is still somewhat contested in paleontology, and I'm really curious about what the forum's consensus will be.
  9. Been a long time, finally got out for a bit and found my 3rd Plesiosaur vert along with some others. Also the first snake encounter of the season. This guy was only a few feet long. 49 degrees with 20 mph winds. Warmer days ahead! Late Cretaceous 80 mya
  10. Mo tooth or dino claw? NJ Cretaceous

    Laying thick in the mud after a torrential rain. I'm certainly not proficient but was thinking Mosasaur tooth with root? Any ideas?
  11. Hey everyone! So, I have recently acquired some fossils and, forever the skeptic and pessimist, I just want to see if they're (likely to be) real or not. Spinosaurus Tooth (Egypt) - Unknown Pterosaur Bone (Unknown) - Mosasaur Teeth (Morocco) - I'm very aware of the fake jaw aspect, I'm just interested in whether or not the teeth are real. Thank you!
  12. I had a fun hike at the North Sulphur River Texas yesterday. I figured it would be picked over but I found a pretty remote spot with my 4x4. The one sawfish tooth I found in a small creek a few days before. Everything else is from yesterday. It was a great day for Cretaceous coprolite (Poo). @GeschWhat The one coprolite is full of fish verts, bones and fins.
  13. Fun with 3D Printing Fossils

    So recently my father bought a 3D printer and we've been experimenting printing some cool fossils for a while now. It's a really cool technology. Though it can take a while to print a piece the results are really quite cool. A life size Archaeopteryx can take a few days to print if you don't keep printing during the night. Finishing up the prints afterwards can also take a bit of time. Cleaning off all the supports and sanding down rough surfaces can be quite the process. Then there's painting depending on the desired result of course. There are actually a lot of nice things that can be found for download on the internet. Though many of these models still require a bit of digital cleanup before they could be printed. So here are a number of the painted, unpainted and half painted results. Most of the printed stuff is dinosaur. Photo of the 3D printer and the just finished print of a juvenile Edmontosaurus lower jaw. And here's the same Edmontosaurus jaw print half painted again with the real fossil in mirror image next to it. I scanned the original bone that I then mirrored digitaly so that I could print out the other side of the jaw. Allosaurus hand claw. Clidastes Mosasaur quadrate bone. Skull of the "Prosauropod" Massospondylus. Holotype right lower jaw of Owenodon, an Iguanodontid. 1/5th scale Nanotyrannus skull. The Cleveland specimen. One of my favourites. The Eichstatt Archaeopteryx specimen. The right side skeleton of the baby Parasaurolophus "Joe". Printed at 1/5th scale. Right humerus and pedal phalanges printed at life size. Most of the fossil prints are for my collection. But my dad also wanted a few cool things which I painted for him. Skulls of Dodo and Australopithecus Taung Child. Most are painted roughly to look like their real counter parts.
  14. Globidens alabamaensis?

    While collecting at a location in SE Virginia which produces a mixture of material from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation and late Miocene/early Pliocene Yorktown Formation, I was shocked to find what I believe to be a cretaceous Globidens sp. anterior tooth fragment. My only explanation for this would be that it must have been redeposited into the Eocene beds and finally exposed with rest of the material. The texture is classic Globidens. The only other species with a slightly similar texture found within these formations (though still markedly different), would be Squalodon sp., however if the tooth were more complete it would clearly prove to be hollow with a conical interior consistent with squamates like mosasaurs. The fragment is approximately 7/8" x 1/2". This is the first bit of possibly cretaceous material I have found from these exposures, so it would be quite interesting if the general consensus is a Globidens sp. Your thoughts would be much appreciated! Thanks, Ash
  15. Made it out to the North Sulphur River yesterday and found a couple of interesting pieces of bone. One was a small jawbone that may be mosasaur but may be small enough to be from some type of fish, not sure. The other piece was one of the largest that I have found but is an odd shape and I am not sure if it may be from a mosasaur, most of the material from this area falls into that group? Any thoughts would be appreciated.
  16. Hi everyone! New member here. I am very excited to make my first post. So I came across a vendor today with some cool stuff, but I wanted to run some photos by the forum members first to see: 1) if you think they are real or fake. 2) how much would you expect to pay for a piece like that. Thanks for the help! Item #1 - Mosasaur Jaw To my eyes, this item looks legit as the teeth don't seem to be floating above the jaw with composite all around it, or teeth pointed in different directions. BUT...I know fakes are good and I am relatively new to educating myself to fakes vs real. Item #2 - Another Mosasaur Jaw (top and bottom) Also looks pretty legit to my newb eyes. But I am worried both top and bottom jaws in that position are too good to be true. Item #3 - Croc Skull? My gut reaction is fake...mostly due to the matrix looking like it was smeared on like cream cheese. Item #4 - Plesiosaur Skull and Neck It's apparently from goulmima southern morocco. Sadly I don't have more pics, as I didn't want to handle it and move it around. But I was able to get down low and see that it does have it's teeth. I just couldn't a good picture of it. :-\ The closest comparison I could find was this plesiosaur head/neck from an archived auction house website image. But the matrix around it seems the same.
  17. New Creek, new adventures

    Had a doctors appointment a couple of weeks ago and as I was driving home I drove over a bridge that sparked my attention. I saw the access was fairly easy to the first couple and sand bars, and being dressed business casual I needed easy. I always keep my rubber boots in the back of the FJ and made my way down for a quick look. The area is Texas Cretaceous Eagle Ford so I knew the odds were good, but I have hunted other creeks in the area and been skunked. I was there for about 15 minutes and about to head back when I spotted a familiar sight. There was a large Ptychodus waiting to be picked up. i headed home and looked at google maps to see if I could find any other access. I found another spot that also looked promising and a couple of days later on the way home from work, I again threw on the boots and hit the couple of accessible piles and was surprised to fine several more Ptychodus teeth and a beautiful large Cretodus. This is weekend though it was cold and rainy, my son and I hit the area again this time spending a little over an hour or so and found a few more broken teeth as well as a large X-Fish vert and a small mosasaur vert. I am certain this creek is going to turn up some great material after the next rains. I am attaching ictures of the finds from the couple of hours I have had to hunt this spot.
  18. Hey guys! Saw these two rooted mosasaur teeth. I was wondering if the roots are a composite or have been composited to the tooth. I saw so many that were composited,it’s unreal... They look pretty good to me especially the one on matrix but I just wanted to make sure. What do you guys think? Regards.
  19. Just a little heads-up if anyone sees these. They're currently for sale at a commonly-used site. The jawbones are actually quite nice, but the teeth all appear to be added afterwards. In my opinion, none are original. Although both are nice decorative pieces, I wouldn't buy them unless they were pretty cheap. Most people will know this already, but posted for the benefit of newbies.
  20. Hi all! I found this in the North Sulphur River this weekend in a large gravel bar. My first thought was that it was a Globidens Mosasaur tooth, but I’m just not sure. It’s approximately a half an inch diameter, has striations on the underside, and a hole in the center. The top side has been flattened, which if a tooth I am assuming is the chewing surface? Completely fossilized. No enamel. I would appreciate any input! Thank you so much!
  21. Believe it or not, it was 80 degrees for a high today in the North Texas area. This warm weather made we want to explore the NSR and a new creek that I had discovered on my last visit. There were several deep pools of water in the creek, so this warm weather would help in case I decided to take a swim (not on purpose) while hunting fossils and artifacts. I noticed on my last creek crawling adventure here, that once I hit the first deep pool, the persistent fossil hunting human tracks in front of me disappeared. I wore my waders and headed into the pool hoping for hard bottom and not mud. As I had hoped, on the other side of the pool, the only tracks I found were coyote and hogs. I begin to find small pieces of bone and a few vertebrae and artifacts that were mostly pieces and parts, but they had been worked on by someone. Several others pools of water were challenges but I only got a little water in my waders and at 80 degrees it did not feel too bad. Here are a few pics of the finds and sorry if you are still dealing with below zero weather were you are!
  22. Hi, What are your opinions on this tooth? Overall the crown of it: Thanks
  23. Hey! I have kind of an odd question. I am purchasing a fossil for a friend as a birthday gift -- between a tip of a mammoth tusk, or a section of mosasaur jaw with teeth. What makes this unique, however, is that we are traveling to the British Virgin Islands (from the United States) for said birthday and I would like to be able to gift the fossil on the birthday instead of waiting until she returns home as we live in different states and I would only be able to ship it to her house and not be there. I am concerned, however, about bringing the fossils with me on the trip as I have heard nightmares about customs causing long hold ups or seizing fossils. Does anyone have any advice on this? Thanks!
  24. Hey everyone, I am posting a pathological Prognathodon sp. tooth with 4 carinae and an odd slight indentation from the Late Cretaceous of New Jersey. I would like to hear any thoughts about this pathology type and if anyone has seen anything similar. Tooth is 17/16 inches. Thanks! Joseph
  25. NSR Mosasaur Bone Structure 2

    From the album North Sulfur River

    This mosasaur bone mineralized in a way that more details of the finer bone structures are preserved. This sample shows osteocytes, which are rings seen around holes where blood vessels used to be.
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