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Found 108 results

  1. Does anyone have a ballpark figure for the amount of time it takes one species to evolve into or diversify into another? I am working on a shark fauna that comes from the Coniacian, and one of the genera is only known from one species that was found in the Santonian (Scindocorax novimexicanus). This site is one to two million years older, and the species is definitely a part of the Scindocorax genus. This is only the second occurrence of this anocoracid reported from New Mexico, and although the teeth compare with that described from the Santonian, I'm wondering if the age difference would indicate a separate species. The Scindocorax novimexicanus photo is a lingual view of a left anterior tooth, while the Scindocorax sp. photo is a labial view of a left lateral tooth. Thanks!
  2. Triassic Therapod Bone

    I found this piece of bone about a month ago and didn't really know what I was dealing with until I started prepping it out. I know that it is theropod based on the hollow structure, this should be at least somewhat visible in the photo of the broken edge. It came from the Redonda Formation in Eastern New Mexico where theropod remains have been found, but nothing identifiable to species. If anyone here can identify the species that would be fantastic, but I really just want to know what bone it is. My guess is the end of the pubis or ilium, but I was hoping for some other opinions.
  3. Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  4. Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  5. Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  6. Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  7. A number of collectors are very interested in Triassic Dinosaur tooth material, however, lots of misinformation exists, partially because little is known and dealers want to sell product. My knowledge is very limited so I tried to put together an assemblage of current information that has been published so that we can all become better versed on this topic. I'm not saying its complete but its the best I can do with my limited knowledge. Most technical papers on this subject are outdated, difficult to read for a novice and not complete enough. Fortunately a recent, legible paper was published in 2015 by Heckert & Lucas that has helped me. I've tried to extract the pertinent information, associated with teeth, since that what most collectors are interested in. First let me get on my sandbox and say that we should NOT assume that what is being sold is accurately described regardless who is selling it or how much you like a dealer. Very little is known and even less is described. If a seller insists what he has identified is accurate, have him show you the technical documents that supports his diagnosis. There are a number of theropods and archosaurs in these assemblages that have serrated teeth so identification is difficult. Triassic dealers similar to those in the Kem Kem which label everthing Spinosaurus like to label everything Coelophysis. Just be cautious..its your money. Almost all the teeth you see sold come from New Mexico so I will focus in that region. A Map of New Mexico with the Triassic outcrops shown below as well as the associated Counties. The numbers correlate to the stratigraphic formations shown below in Figure 4. Figure 4 The Zuni Mountains in West-Central NM are from the lower Chinle Group (Bluewater Creek Fm) and contain Tetrapod fossils amphibians and phytosaurs and aetosaurs. Dinosaurs are possible but nothing is diagnostic. Faunal List of the lower Chinle Group Zuni Mountains Northern/West Central New Mexico has yielded some of the most interesting Vertebrate Fossils most associated with Coelophysis at Ghost Ranch. Included in this group are the Petrified Forest and Rock Point Formation of the western counties. Chindesaurus bryansmalli, Tawa hallae and Daemonosaurus chauliodus are considered valid a dinosaurs in the Petrified Forest Fm. Coelophysis bauri is valid from the Rock Point Formation. Faunal List of the Petrified Forest and Rock Point Formation - Key on this list is Coelophysis bauri in the Rock Point Fm Northeasten New Mexico (Bull Canyon and Redonda Formations). Heckerts 2015 paper comments that dinosaur fossils remains are rare in the Bull Canyon Formation. The coelophysoid Gojirasaurus quayi has been described but its taxonomic placement is uncertain. Herrerasauridae tooth fragments have been found but nothing has been assigned to a taxon. Heckerts & Lucas 2015 Paper on Triassic Vertebrate Paleontology in New Mexico https://libres.uncg.edu/ir/asu/f/Heckert_Andrew_triassic.pdf Bull Canyon Formation 2001 Paper on Vertebrate Fauna https://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/downloads/52/52_p0123_p0151.pdf Latest placement ( Hans-Dieter Sues et al 2011 ) Identifying Coelophysis bauri Teeth - There is lots of variation their teeth and I will show a few types. The Museum of Northern Arizona publication Coelophysis describes the teeth as follows: All the teeth are recurved Premaxillary teeth: rounded cross-section, smaller teeth are ribbed but smooth on larger ones. None show serrations. Maxillary Teeth: the first tooth is recurved with no serrations, second tooth has serrations only on the posterior carina. All the other maxillary teeth have serrations on both edges. Some of the teeth the serrations may be limited to the upper part of the anterior (mesial) edge. Dentary Teeth: the first seven teeth lack serrations, eight tooth serrations only on the posterior edge. Subsequent teeth have serrations on both edges. The first four teeth are elliptical (rounded) in cross-section being compressed after that. Anterior teeth may contain ridges. Serrations are very fine 8 to 9 per millimeter on the posterior (distal) edge. (other publications say 7/mm) Distal Carina Denticles Premaxillary, Maxillary and Dentary teeth shown - Dentary tooth Maxillary Tooth Anterior Denticles Posterior Maxillary Tooth Paper on Coelophsis Teeth by Currie and Buckley Coelophisis.pdf Additional images of the teeth with no supporting info Good overall paper on C. bauri but does nothing to increase our knowledge on how to describe its teeth https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292525024_The_paleobiology_of_Coelophysis_bauri_Cope_from_the_Upper_Triassic_Apachean_Whitaker_quarry_New_Mexico_with_detailed_analysis_of_a_single_quarry_block Other Theropods Gojirasaurus quayi : one tooth was described with the holotype however it was found isolated and cannot be positively assigned to this species. I cannot find an image of it. Chindesaurus bryansmalli : not aware of any skeletal material Daemonosaurus chauliodus The paper does not get into detail on the teeth. See below http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/278/1723/3459.full.pdf Tawa hallae : paper is paywalled 1 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/326/5959/1530
  8. Upper Cretaceous Units in New Mexico

    From the album Upper Cretaceous New Mexico

    from New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources
  9. Enigmatic Ammonite Eggs (?)

    Hey all: For your consideration and expertise, an ammonite partial collected by the poster's parent has some interesting features. I don't know the exact formation of origin, but within the Rio Puerco river valley known to be Cretaceous period. I'm posting the best images I have at the moment, which, in addition to the partial with the scale cube (lower ammonite partial), are my attempts at using a smart phone to shoot down the dissection scope tube with the ocular removed...It's the best I can do at the moment. In question are the egg like features you can see on the partial. Most ammo eggs I have seen are spherical and not bacilli-like. The black dots are lichens that are commonly found in area rocks, usually in small crevices that trap dew. Thoughts?
  10. New Mexico

    Will be in NM in march, any suggestions for hunting the Socorro area?
  11. Herrick on Herrick

    "Our laboratory was the geologic wonderland of New Mexico; our problems anything and everything which the face of that remarkable region presents to the student of earth history. The lecture platform was one end of the wagon seat, the shaded ground under a juniper tree, or the ragged wall of an igneous dyke. My student's desk was the other end of the wagon seat, a rock in the shade, or the bank of some arroyo. The hours were from daylight till long after dark, the discussion endless, and the themes were notebooks filled by the shifting light of the campfire. Under the stars of New Mexico's matchless sky I listened to a great man discuss evolution, magmatic segregation, stream erosion, and as the dying fire sunk to glowing embers and the stars shone more brightly I listened while the scintillating mind strayed into those fields of psychology and philosophy he loved so well, and heard him expound the principles of dynamic monism." -Douglas Johnson (field assistant) Clarence Luther Herrick: Pioneer Naturalist, Teacher, and Psychobiologist
  12. See El Paso dinosaur tracks in public tour this Sunday El Paso 411, January 5, 2018 http://elpaso411.com/2018/01/see-el-paso-dinosaur-tracks-in-public-tour-this-sunday/ http://www.insightselpaso.org/first-sunday-dinotracks-public-tour/ Note: January 7, 2018 tour is now full. Next tour is February 4, 2018. Go see El Paso Science Center, Inc. at http://www.insightselpaso.org/first-sunday-dinotracks-public-tour/ The Dinosaur Tracks of Mount Cristo Rey http://www.geo.utep.edu/pub/dinosaurs/ Insights offers dino tracks to NM Park could be start for proposed Rio Grande Trail By David Crowder, El Paso Inc. March 14, 2016 http://www.elpasoinc.com/news/local_news/insights-offers-dino-tracks-to-nm/article_80cfee9e-e9f6-11e5-8193-9b3d1927b42b.html Related papers are: Kappus, E. and Cornell, W.C., 2003. A new Cretaceous dinosaur tracksite in Southern New Mexico. Paleontologia Electronica, 6, pp. 1-6. http://palaeo-electronica.org/2003_1/track/track.pdf?iframe=true&width=640&height=480 Kappus, E.J., Lucas, S.G. and Langford, R., 2011. The Cerro de Cristo Rey Cretaceous dinosaur tracksites, Sunland Park, New Mexico, USA, and Chihuahua, Mexico. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 53, pp. 272-288. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283015035_The_Cerro_de_Cristo_Ray_Cretaceous_Dinosaur_tracksites_Sunland_Park_New_Mexico_USA_and_Chihuahua_Mexico Yours, Paul H.
  13. Carlsbad man recounts dinosaur fossil discovery By DeJanay Booth, Carlsbad Current-Argus Nov. 30, 2017 http://www.currentargus.com/story/news/local/2017/11/30/carlsbad-man-recounts-dinosaur-fossil-discovery-museum/910807001/ Yours, Paul H.
  14. Pseudopalatus Tooth

    Collected on private property owned by Larry Martin.
  15. Back to the windmill site 2 weekends ago and just now uploading the pics...It was a short trip, so didn't find much, but I did enjoy great fall weather, and some really cool calcite-infilled clams,,,
  16. Hi there... The piece on top I collected from the Fruitland Shale today. The piece on bottom is from the Albuquerque Natural History Museum. I am trying to identify the conifer shoot towards the top of both photos which almost sort of resembles a fish vertebra. Any ideas as to what species or family it could be? Looks like Cupressaceae /Taxodiaceae or Araucariaceae.
  17. Welcome to another microscopic look into the wonderful world of coprolites. Here we have a squished (flattened) spiral coprolite from the prehistoric floodplains that now form the Bull Canyon Formation in the badlands of Quay County, New Mexico. Today's mystery was most likely not ingested. Many times the posterior (non-pinched end) of spiral coprolites can be hollow. I may be wrong, but I think this branchy thing (for lack of a better term) slipped in after it was expelled. To me this looks like part of a branch from a delicate coral - but the poop was in fresh water. Any ideas?
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