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Found 168 results

  1. It was only 9 days since my previous (and first) trip to HH, but I was itching to go back and decided to take advantage of the mild weather this Monday. I spent most of the day on the north side of the south pit picking tiny fossils out of the mud. There are an astonishing variety of critters to find if you don't mind lying face down in the dirt. 1. Tiny trilobites! I was not expecting to find any trilobites until I spotted the guy on the left. Luckily I had a small ziplock bag or I would have lost these for sure. They are about 2.5 and 3.0 mm across the head. 2. Nautiloids Fragments like these are most common after brachiopod and crinoid bits 3. Ammonites/goniatites Also very common but one of my favorites, I will never find enough of these. 4. Brachiopods and bivalves Fragments everywhere but a bit harder to find complete 5. Another brach Nothing special, just nicely inflated and good detail on both sides 6. Another brach A little more interesting. I only found one like this. 7. Gastropod I found many fragments that suggest this shape but this one is by far the most compete. 8. Crinoid stem fragments Very abundant but these ones caught my eye 9. Part of a crinoid calyx? (opposite sides of the same piece shown) 10. Cystoid plates Could be wrong, I just learned about cystoids so I'm bound to imagine seeing them everywhere
  2. I found this at Hungry Hollow in Arkona, Ontario. Sadly I can't remember which formation I pulled it from but my understanding is they are all Devonian age. It may just be a coral fragment but I've heard fish bones can be found. Any ideas?
  3. Hello, I want to put together some pics of some of the reef material that I have found in Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario on the banks of the Credit River. It is now winter and I am missing the warm days in which I can go and wade in the warm waters of the river for fun. I just want to compile and share some specimens that whose photos I have not shared with. All the fossils belong to the Georgian Bay formation, Upper Member, which is late Ordovician in age. First is the common coral that displays an enormity of growth forms, Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826).
  4. Brechin Ontario 12/2/2017

    Here are my finds from the Verulam fm in Brechin Ontario. I had never been to an active quarry before so it was cool to see some of the machinery in addition to the unending supply of rocks to split. The temperature was amazing for December and we didn't get any rain. The very bottom of the quarry exposes the Bobcaygeon fm but it was flooded this time. @Malcolmt thanks for taking me to your spot! I remember what you said most of these are but will need reminding on a couple... 1. Pleurocystite - sadly missing the stalk and one of the arms but great to find one (Didn't know they existed until Saturday) A few of the plates fell off so I got a better look at the structure underneath before gluing it back together 2. Ceraurus trilobites 3. Isotelus trilobite 4. (forgot the name) partial trilobite Needs some cleaning but I'm afraid to damage it 5. Crinoid calyx (forgot the name) 6. Unknown cephalopod
  5. Disorganized chaos

    Well I got a new phone (Samsung Galaxy Note 8) on Black Friday and was playing with it snapping some pictures. Those of you that have been to my house know that I am totally disorganized and definitely need to organize my fossils. Thought I would share some of the disorganized chaos that is my basement fossil dumping area. This tends to be where fossils go to rest if they do not make it to the glass display cases (3) upstairs where I put the good stuff. But then that is a step up from the ones that never get out of the map drawers and boxes in the garage. One of these days I will get around to organizing things, just never happens to be today....... I suspect my kids will end up having to organize it someday......... (That's a scary thought)
  6. Sliced and polished nautiloids

    More from the Etobicoke creek in Mississauga. Ive been slicing and polishing some worn down nautiloid fragments and they look pretty cool.
  7. Trip to Arkona, Ontario

    I decided to mix things up last weekend and made the 2.5 hour drive from Mississauga over to Arkona, Ontario. The Hungry Hollow formation is quite different from what I am used to closer to home so I went a little crazy...Within 10 minutes I had a bucket full of horn corals, bryozoans and brachiopods. After washing most of the mud away here are some of my favorites. Scale is in millimeters Trilobite fragments 1 2 3 4 Was really hoping for a complete specimen but I am pretty happy with this cephalon pair 5 Brachiopods 6 7 8 Gastropods 9 Chrinoids 10 11 Cephalopod - Probably came from the Arkona shale 12 @Kane you were right, I spent about 5 hours in the south pit and had a great time. Also met a really interesting guy while I was there (I'm horrible with names I think he said it was Rick). He knew the area quite well and was nice enough to donate a few pieces to get me started (#4 trilo fragment on the right and a few cool bryozoans).
  8. This ones a keeper

    Contrary to what some people may suspect I actually collected other things besides cystoids and echinoderms this past summer. Here is a trilobite that I am quite fond of that was found back in July. It was found in a blast of Ordovician Verulam. Took me a good 1/2 hour to get it cut out. It was in a very large slab that was a bit awkwardly positioned and I could not move it by myself. Both of my regular collecting buddies had already packed it in for the day so I was on my own to figure out how to get it out. Definitely worth the effort. It prepped up quite nicely in my humble opinion and best yet it was mine and not someone elses. Seemed to be always working on other peoples stuff this season. Just the two left rear most pleura were partially missing on this one. Have been debating whether or not to restore them. On the positive side it is 7 cm in length, so a very decent size. I suspect that this one is going to end up in my personal collection. As they say it is a keeper. For those of you that do not recognize this bug it is a Failleana indeterminata which are definitely a rarity in this locality. I have only ever seen in person one other prone complete specimen found here and that one sold for quite a bit of money. Personally I think this one is nicer. Alas found in July, prepped in September and October this one is not a candidate for IFOTM.
  9. Well the realm of my future fossils is just as chaotic. I suspect I have years worth of unprepped material here. Need to get my moving ...... I also have a garage full and several shelving units in another room As you can see they don't look that spectacular prior to getting some love and care.
  10. Kane, Debbie and Shamalama

    Just recently finished doing these for a few Fossil Forum members (Kane and Shamalama) Likely wont be seeing them for a bit so I thought they would like to see their bugs and knew neither would mind me posting them. None were pristine but a little prep helped.... First are a pair that belong to Kane and Debbie The second belongs to Shamalama
  11. Lake Ontario finds, Whitby ON

    Some recent finds from Lake Ontario, East of Toronto. Unknown Graptolites Lots of fragments Bivalve
  12. Etobicoke creek finds

    Here are a few pieces I've found in the Etobicoke creek, Mississauga, Ontario. Nautiloids Crinoid fragments Unknown Unknown
  13. I found this little guy last weekend in the Whitby formation (Upper Ordovician) of Craigleith, Ontario. Any ideas? Did a small amount of searching and to me it looks like Triarthrus eatoni.
  14. The older I get, the more spring has an appreciable effect on my energy and outlook. But, it also signals an end to cabin fever and getting back into the hunt. Spread out over two non-consecutive days, I took to getting back into practice by doing some collecting nearby. There are no "wow" specimens here, but certainly typical ones I find from a wide mix of stratigraphic units all in one place. The first is one of the areas I focus on, which are mostly little gullies where some larger rocks are exposed, and smaller ones get sifted.
  15. My story will be a bit(could be too much) long, so I put this report separately from @Kane's report. I'm not sure I can do this or not 'cause this is my first time to write same topic from others'. If I should not do this, I apologize administrator for making bothersome Before I start my story, I convey my profound and huge gratitude to @crinus for taking me quarries(these travels were my very first visiting to not only quarries, but also Ontario's fossil site!) and giving a lot of nice fossils to me what he found, and to @Northern Sharks for giving a nice specimen to me what he found as well from Brechin quarry and organizing Bowmanville journey(I didn't know that until seeing from @Kane's report. I'm not sure that you set the all plans), and to @Malcolmt for giving a complete crinoid to me, which is my first complete crinoid possessing arms and stems, and finally to everyone that I've met on this travel for welcoming me *Plus - My report will be incomplete 'cause I don't know that much about Ontario's geological information and some species' scientific names. So, I'll appreciate greatly if you guys tell me about right information and help me to correct it I revised this post a loooot of times 'cause I realized that it was not report, but a proper diary(Too Much Information.. and still, it's like a diary..) Well.. Now then, I'll begin my long story with some pictures though I couldn't make to take that many pictures of quarries and people. As for the Brechin quarry, I forgot to take my phone and there was no time to take DSLR out from my bag. And as for the Bowmanville quarry, I was so concentrating to find fossils that I forgot to take pictures *Date : Oct.21&22.2017 *Location : Brechin quarry & Bowmanville quarry *Records of formation : Brechin quarry - D -----> Upper Verulam Formation(There was a "cluster" of fauna that I think it's different from below one. Color was bright grey and somewhat yellowish) DD -----> Middle Verulam Formation(Bluish and grey rocks with vurnerable condition) DDD -----> Lower Verulam Formation(Brown and grey rocks) DDDD -----> Upper Bobcaygeon Formation(Alternates between sublithogenic and medium calcarenitic limestone, but also includes some brown lithographic limestone and bluish fine-grained limestone in minor thicknesses)[*] [Buried under the ground] Middle Bobcaygeon Formation(Grey and brown, very fine grained to sublithogenic, sparsely fossiliferous limestone, with some fine-grained limestone in the upper part)[*] [Buried under the ground] Lower Bobcaygeon Formation(Brownish grey, fine- and medium-grained limestone)[*] (Reference - [*] Bobcaygeon formation - Weblex Canada. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://weblex.nrcan.gc.ca/html/001000/GSCC00053001579.html @Northern Sharks informed me! Thank you! ) Bowmanville quarry - D -----> Blue Mountain Formation (I couldn't get there.) DD Upper Lindsay formation DDD Level 2 (?) DDDD Level 3(?) - Lower Lindsay formation (Below as well. The quarry was so biiiiiig!!) - - *Geological Age - Middle Ordovician These all rocks are what I took. Maybe I took a lot of fossils even if it is only a small part of trilobites. I just so excited that I found Ontario's trilobites directly, not through internet store or pictures! Well.. Now I'm worried the weight.. Could I take these whole fossils?... I should have considered about it, not just collect unnecessary things by my instinct. It was not a clever move.. That crinoid(at 11 O'clock-wise) is not what I found these quarries. I found it from Scarbourough bluffers park before. To begin, the beginning of the day(Oct.21) I've met @crinus first at the very early morning of the day(For me. 'cause I'm not the early bird type). Actually, we met from Ebay. I won his two auction and I asked him that would you wait for me until I get to Canada in order to reduce shipping cost. Then, he offered me to go to quarries with him! Anyway, we arrived there around at 8:30 AM and there were 4 or more people had already arrived. I've met @Malcolmt and two other people(Sorry, I can't remember the name. My poor memory..) on near the greenish and bluish pond in the quarry. After handshaking, @crinus and I went to the piles of rocks, which is near the pond. We climbed up the piles of rocks and met @Northern Sharks on there. He found one complete Calyptaulax sp. and dropped it from his hand while we were greeting each other(yet, fortunately, the trilobite was alive with small crack on the pygidium(if my memory is correct)) After the greeting, @crinus and @Northern Sharks went to another place and I remained there, which was that @Northern Sharks found a trilobite, and looked for trilobites with hammering big rocks. I found a horn coral, which is Lambeophyllum profundum Conrad, 1843, the cephalon part of Ceraurus sp. , and a loooot of brachiopods and so on It came from lower Verulam formation. This one is Lambeophyllum profundum Conrad, 1843( @Northern Sharks and @FossilDAWG informed me! Thank you! ) Ceraurus globulobatus? I don't know the exact name of this specimen.. This one maybe came from the middle Verulam formation because of its color. Though I found this from the lower Verulam formation area.
  16. Body segment?

    Found at Hungry Hollow in Devonian-era clay. Seems iron-rich, so it is possibly man-made. Is it a segmented body part? Both sides depicted, with end views
  17. Any idea? From Widder shale.

    Anyone have any idea what this might be? Was found last week while splitting Widder shale looking for Greenops. I usually don't take much home other than trilobites but I have never seen anything like this before. From Hamilton group, Widder formation, was found alongside Greenops bits. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks!
  18. Shark teeth at Hungry Hollow

    Found the teeth today at Hungry Hollow. In decades of fossil hunting in the area, I have never seen evidence of sharks. The teeth seem modern and could have been left there. The stratum is Devonian based upon my simple understanding. Did sharks coexist with the coral, brachiopods, crinoids and occasional trilobite that are commonly found here?
  19. Lake Ontario ID

    Today I went Orthoceras hunting on the shore of Lake Ontario. I found a rock that clearly has some fossil activity going on but I cannot figure it out. I am unsure if it is just a strangely configured algae fossil (just different than I normally find). P.s. please disregard my bunny pajamas lol
  20. Greenops widderensis

    Acquired from @PaleoPat during a recent trade. This trilobite is originally from Arkona and is uncommon.
  21. Identification

    Good day all, Like I've mentioned in my introduction post, I've found some interesting pieces, in my opinion, that I'd like you guys to peruse. Thanks and have fun.
  22. Roadcut in Hamilton

    Today I decided to go and visit a roadcut that I red on one of the Silurian literatures I got my hands on (a big thank you to those that led me to those PDFs relating to the geology of the Niagara Escarpment). It turns out the roadcut on the Niagara Escarpment is near my home which is a pleasant suprise to me, considering that I have been disappointed by the Queenston formation. This roadcut is actually several exposures that run on an access road that can lead one to the upper part of Hamilton, Ontario. Here is the exposure I decided to explore. I chose this exposure as the access is a busy boulevard with cars driving by with no sidewalks and pedestrians. I had several people honk and call out to me as I was exploring the site. Maybe I should have worn a safety vest of some sort? Is that even necessary?
  23. Today I managed to explore and observe an exposure of the Queenston formation up close here in Hamilton, Ontario. I chose a site along the Red Hill Valley Expressway that was easy to access and get down to for a close look. The creek is right next to the highway. I have always passed by this exposure and anticipated the day I'll be able to observe it. The Queenston formation is the last Ordovician formation in south-western Ontario before the rocks hit the Silurian age. The Queenston is what overlains the Georgian Bay formation, the formation I use to hunt in frequently in Toronto, Ontario. This is Red Hill Creek as it passes by next to the Highway.
  24. Honestly I seriously thought about not posting this find from yesterday. I did not want any of you thinking that the fossil gods where being grossly unfair. But then I decided that in all likelihood most of my comrades here on the forum will never have seen one of these, never mind one this is pretty much as good as you find them. Promise not to submit it for IPFOTM. Four of us were out collecting splitting a lot of rock and excavating near the area that I found those two amazing Astrocystites a few weeks ago (August Invertebrate Fossil of the month) After a very unproductive 5 hours two of my friends gave up and headed home leaving the two regular diehards (Myself and J.) Seeing as no one had found anything of note splitting rock in the blast piles, we both decided decided to work on excavating the wall about 25 feet from the area that produced the astrocystites and a wealth of other cystoids and edrioasteroids. After about 8 hours of wall excavating J. was rewarded with a gorgeous complete extra large pleurosystites. As for myself I somehow once again lucked out finding this spectacular Amygdalocysties florealis. Only a few of these are found each year at this site and rarely are they as complete as this. This is a class of echinoderms known as paracrinoids. There are only two species represented in southern Ontario the Comarocystities and this one the amygdalocystites. These only occured in the Ordovician. I guess they were a failed experiment. This specimen was found at the top of the BobCaygeon formation. Here is what they look like...... very weird........ but cool Believe it or not I spent about 5 hours prepping this with 40 micron dolomite, .015 nozzle and 18 PSI. Here is the before picture. I actually knew what it was in the field because of the distinctinve pattern of the plates. I aslo could see that it had a stem and at least one arm in the field. I had to field douse it thoroughly in Cyano as it looked like it was ready to flake off the plate at the slightest tough. Here it is as found.... (not much to look at) Here it is prepped The finished creature is 35 mm x 20 mm wide The whole plate which also has a small crinoid on it.
  25. Hello everyone! Yesterday, Viola and I were able to visit Hungry Hollow (near Arkona, Ontario), and we had a wonderful time! When we last visited the site back in April, it was cold and cloudy; yesterday, it was hot and sunny, and there were no bugs to bother us, so we were in the South Pit collecting fossils the entire time (about 3.5 hours). Unfortunately I didn't take many pictures, but I blame that on all of the fossils that were calling to me - they wouldn't let me take a break to take pictures! In all seriousness, though, it was a fantastic day out with my little girl - please enjoy the pictures I do have to share with you. Oh, and for those of you that aren't familiar with the rocks at Hungry Hollow - they are Mid-Devonian. Picture #1: Viola just before we headed into the South Pit Picture #2: Viola searching for brachiopods (as usual!) Picture #3: a spiny brachiopod - does anyone know its identity? @Kane Picture #4: a couple of "mommy and baby" Mucrospirifer thedfordensis (I think!) brachiopods - Bob O'Donnell found and gave the one on the right to Viola, while I found and am going to keep the one on the left so we each have one to remember our times together fossil-hunting Picture #5: a gastropod - Platyceras sp. - does anyone know the species name? Picture #6: I found my own Tornoceras sp. - hooray!!! Back in April, Bob found one and gave it to Viola, and I have to admit that I was a little envious because they're so pretty. Well, yesterday I found this specimen, and it's a really pretty shade of purple - I'm in love (Is the species name arkonense, by the way?) Picture #7: A coral with an epibiont on top of it - someone yesterday (I believe his name was Darren - he also gave Viola a bottle of water while we were in the pit - a very nice guy!) told me what it is, but I can't recall what he said. Any ideas? Picture #8: This is probably my favourite hash plate that I found yesterday because there is so much going on - bryozoans, corals, and crinoids - oh my! And perhaps a bit of a trilobite peeking out near the top...? Well that's all for now. I'll likely add more photos after we wash Viola's finds and look through all of our fossils more carefully. Thanks for reading! Monica
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