Search the Community: Showing results for tags 'Ontario'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians
    • Corals
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Ammonoids & Nautiloids
    • Bivalves
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Vertebrates
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Vertebrates
  • Other Chordates

Found 85 results

  1. I was very happy to have my first ebay bid won and this plate was what I got. I've always wanted some fossils from the Lake Simcoe area but I never had the capacity to travel outside that far out of Toronto. Apparently there are two types of cystoids on this plate. This plate comes from the Upper Bobcaygeon formation, Ordovician period from Simcoe County, Ontario. It's a very different fauna from what can be found here in the bedrock of Toronto. Cystoids don't occur in the Georgian Bay formation. Paying for this plate took a bit of a hit on my wallet but I think I think it's worth it considering that I don't have anything like this in my collection.
  2. 400 million year old gigantic extinct monster worm discovered in Canadian museum University of Bristol, February 21, 2017 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170221095643.htm https://phys.org/news/2017-02-million-year-gigantic-extinct-monster.html http://www.bris.ac.uk/news/2017/february/giant-worm-fossil-.html Mats E. Eriksson, Luke A. Parry, and David M. Rudkin, 2017, Earth’s oldest ‘Bobbit worm’ – gigantism in a Devonian eunicidan polychaete. Scientific Reports, 2017; 7: 43061 DOI: 10.1038/srep43061 http://www.nature.com/articles/srep43061 Yours, Paul H.
  3. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since January 26, 2017. Canada Faunas and Localities Alberta Dalzell, M.T.J. (2007). Correlated Biostratigraphy and Palaeoecology of Microplankton from the Bearpaw Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian) of Alberta, Canada. Masters Thesis - University of Saskatchewan. Fanti, F. and T. Miyashita (2009). A high latitude vertebrate fossil assemblage from the Late Cretaceous of west-central Alberta, Canada: evidence for dinosaur nesting and vertebrate latitudinal gradient. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 275. Frebold, H. (1966). Upper Pliensbachian Beds in the Fernie Group of Alberta. Geological Survey of Canada, Paper 66-27. Martindale, R.C., et al. (2017). A new Early Jurassic (ca. 183 Ma) fossil Lagerstätte from Ya Ha Tinda, Alberta, Canada. The Geological Society of America, open access. (Thanks to Oxytropidoceras for finding this one!) Martindale, R.C., et al. (2017). Supplementary Data to "A new Early Jurassic fossil Lagerstätte from Ya Ha Tinda, Canada (~183 Ma)" - GSA Data Repository 2017066. Meijer Drees, N.C., et al. (2002). Lithostratigraphy, Sedimentology, Paleontology, Organic Petrology, and Organic Geochemistry of the Middle Devonian Ashern, Winnipegosis, and Eyot Formations in East-Central Alberta and West-Central Saskatchewan. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 572. Mellon, G.B. (1967). Stratigraphy and Petrology of the Lower Cretaceous Blairmore and Manville Groups, Alberta Foothills and Plains. Research Council of Alberta, Bulletin 21. Mychaluk, K.A., A.A. Levinson and R.L. Hall (2001). Ammolite: Iridescent Fossilized Ammonite from Southern Alberta, Canada. Gems and Gemology, Vol.37, Number 1. Scott, C.S. (2001). Middle Paleocene Mammals from Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Masters Thesis - University of Alberta. Scott, C.S., R.C. Fox and G.P. Youzwyshyn (2002). New earliest Tiffanian (late Paleocene) mammals from Cochrane 2, southwestern Alberta, Canada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 47(4). Simpson, G.G. (1927). Mammalian Fauna and Correlation of the Paskapoo Formation of Alberta. American Museum Novitates, Number 268. Wood, J.M., R.G. Thomas and J. Visser (1988). Fluvial Processes and Vertebrate Taphonomy: The Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation, South-Central Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 66. British Columbia Archibald, S.B., et al. (2011). Great Canadian Lagerstätten 1. Early Eocene Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington State). Geoscience Canada, Vol.38, Number 4. Archibald, S.B., et al. (2010). Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington): emergent communities in Early Eocene climates. GeoCanada 2010 - Working with the Earth. Caron, J.-B. and D.A. Jackson (2008). Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 258. Caron, J.-B. and D. Rudkin (eds.)(2009). A Burgess Shale Primer. History, Geology and Research Highlights. International Conference on the Cambrian Explosion, Field Trip Companion Volume. Dillhoff, R.M., E.B. Leopold and S.R. Manchester (2005). The McAbee flora of British Columbia and its relation to the Early-Middle Eocene Okanagan Highlands flora of the Pacific Northwest. Can.J. Earth Sci., Vol.42. Greenwood, D.R., et al. (2005). Fossil biotas from the Okanagan Highlands, southern British Columbia and northeastern Washington State: climates and ecosystems across an Eocene landscape. Can.J. Earth Sci., 42. Haggart, J.W., et al. (2009). Molluscan biostratigraphy and paleomagnetism of Campanian strata, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia: implications for Pacific coast North America biochronology. Cretaceous Research, 30. Hofmann, H.J., E.W. Mountjoy and M.W. Teitz (1985). Ediacaran fossils from the Miette Group, Rocky Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. Geology, Vol.13 Johns, M.J., C.R. Barnes and Y.R. Narayan (2005). Cenozoic and Cretaceous Ichtyoliths from the Tofino Basin and Western Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.8, Issue 2. Ludvigsen, R. (2001). The fossils at Driftwood Canyon Provincial Park: A management plan for BC parks. Ludvigsen, R. (1999). Deep Time and Ancient Life in the Columbia Basin. Living Landscapes, Royal British Columbia Museum. Mathewes, R.W., D.R. Greenwood and S.B. Archibald (2016). Paleoenvironments of the Quilchena flora, British Columbia during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum. Can.J. Earth Sci., 53. Morris, S.C. and R.A. Robison (1988). More Soft-Bodied Animals and Algae from the Middle Cambrian of Utah and British Columbia. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 122. Poinar, G., B. Archibald and A. Brown (1999). New Amber Deposit Provides Evidence of Early Paleogene Extinctions, Paleoclimates and Past Distributions. The Canadian Entomologist, 131. Schaeffer, B. and M. Mangus (1976). An Early Triassic Fish Assemblage from British Columbia. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.156, Article 5. Villeneuve, M. and R. Mathewes (2005). An Early Eocene age for the Quilchena fossil locality, southern British Columbia. Geological Survey of Canada, Current Research, 2005-A4. Zonneveld, J.-P., M.K. Gingras and S.G. Pemberton (2001). Trace fossil assemblages in a Middle Triassic mixed siliciclastic carbonate marginal marine depositional system, British Columbia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 166. Manitoba Bamburak, J.D., J. Hatcher and M.P.B. Nicholas (2012). Chemostratigraphy, paleontology and mineral potential of the Gammon Ferruginous Member of the Cretaceous Pierre Shale in southwestern Manitoba (parts of NTS 62F, G, H, J, K, N, O, 63C, F). In: Report of Activities 2012. Manitoba Innovation, Energy and Mines, Manitoba Geological Survey. Elias, R.J., et al. (2013). Ordovician-Silurian boundary interval in the Williston Basin outcrop belt of Manitoba: a record of global and regional environmental and biotic change. Field Trip Guidebook FT-C5/ Open File OF2013-1. McGregor, D.C., et al. (1971). Fossils of the Red River Formation (Cat Head Member), Manitoba. Contributions to Canadian Paleontology, Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 202. Young, G.A., et al. (2012). Great Canadian Lagerstätten 3. Late Ordovician Konservat-Lagerstätten in Manitoba. Geoscience Canada, Vol.39. Young, G.A., et al. Late Ordovician Lagerstatten in Manitoba, Canada: Glimpses of Soft-Bodied Diversity. New Brunswick Bay of Fundy Ecosystem Partnership (2010). Fundy's Fascinating Fossils: The Unique Palaeontology of the Bay of Fundy. Fundy Issues, Issue 31. Gilpin, J.B. (1874). Observations on some Fossil Bones found in New Brunswick, Dominion of Canada. Nova Scotian Institute of Natural Science, 3(4). Jutras, P., J. Utting and S.R. McCutcheon (2005). Basin inversion at the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian boundary in northern New Brunswick, Canada. Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology, Vol.53, Number 4. Kennedy, K. (2011). The Campbellton Formation, New Brunswick, Canada: A Sedimentological and Paleoenvironmental Description of an Early Devonian (Emsian) Vegetated Landscape. Masters Thesis - Dalhousie University. Newfoundland and Labrador Boyce, W.D. and W.L. Dickson (2006). Recent Fossil Finds in the Indian Islands Group, Central Newfoundland. Current Research, Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Natural Resources Geological Survey, Report 06-1. Boyce, W.D., J.S. Ash and B.H. O'Brien (1991). A New Fossil Locality in the Bay of Exploits, Central Newfoundland. Current Research, Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy, Geological Survey Branch, Report 91-1. Boyce, W.D., et al. (2000). The Upper St. George Group, Western Port Au Port Peninsula: Lithostratigraphy, Biostratigraphy, Depositional Environments and Regional Implications. Current Research (2000) Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy, Geological Survey, Report 2000-1. Bullock, R.J., J.R. Morris and D. Selby (2011). New Findings of Body and Trace Fossils in the St. Bride's Area, Cape St. Mary's Peninsula, Newfoundland. Current Research (2011) Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey Report 11-1. Clapham, M.E., G.M. Narbonne and J.G. Gehling (2003). Paleoecology of the oldest known animal communities: Ediacaran assemblages at Mistaken Point, Newfoundland. Paleobiology, 29(4). Gillespie, H. (1998). Acritarch Biostratigraphy and Taxonomy of the Waterhouse Formation (Upper Ordovician, Port Au Port Peninsula, Newfoundland). Masters Thesis - Memorial University of Newfoundland. O'Brien, S.J. and A.F. King (2004). Ediacaran Fossils from the Bonavista Peninsula (Avalon Zone), Newfoundland: Preliminary Descriptions and Implications for Regional Correlation. Current Research (2004) Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy Geological Survey, Report 04-1. O'Brien, S.J., et al. (2006). Lithostratigraphic and Biostratigraphic Studies on the Eastern Bonavista Peninsula: An Update. Current Research (2006) Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Natural Resources Geological Survey, Report 06-1. Skovsted, C.B. and J.S. Peel (2007). Small shelly fossils from the argillaceous facies of the Lower Cambrian Forteau Formation of western Newfoundland. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(4). Northwest Territories Campbell, M. (2003). A Guide to Fossils in the Norman Wells Area, Northwest Territories. Northwest Territories Resources, Wildlife, and Economic Development - Oil and Gas Division. Kimmig, J.K.F. (2014). Taxonomy, Taphonomy and Paleoecology of a New Burgess Shale-Type Lagerstătte from the MacKenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada. Ph.D. Thesis - University of Saskatchewan. Kimmig, J.K.F. and B.R. Pratt (2015). Soft-bodied biota from the middle Cambrian (Drumian) Rockslide Formation, Mackenzie Mountains, northwestern Canada. Journal of Paleontology, 89(1). MacNaughton, R.B., B.R. Pratt and K.M. Fallas (2013). Observations on Cambrian stratigraphy in the eastern Mackenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories. Geological Survey of Canada, Current Research 2013-10. Poulton, T.P. (1991). Hettangian through Aalenian (Jurassic) Guide Fossils and Biostratigraphy, Northern Yukon and Adjacent Northwest Territories. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 410. Weston, T.C. (1892). Notes on the Miocene Tertiary Rocks of the Cypress Hills, North-West Territory of Canada. Transactions of the Nova Scotian Institute of Science, Session of 1892-'93. Nova Scotia Bay of Fundy Ecosystem Partnership (2010). Fundy's Fascinating Fossils: The Unique Palaeontology of the Bay of Fundy. Fundy Issues, Issue 31. Carpenter, D.K., et al. (2015). Early Pennsylvanian (Langsettian) Fish Assemblages from the Joggins Formation, Canada, and Their Implications for Palaeoecology and Palaeogeography. Palaeontology, Vol.58, Part 4. Denison, R.H. (1955). Early Devonian Vertebrates from the Knoydart Formation of Nova Scotia. Fieldiana Geology, Vol.37. Zodrow, E.L. and M. Mastalerz (2009). A proposed origin for fossilized Pennsylvanian plant cuticles by pyrite oxidation (Sydney Coalfield, Nova Scotia, Canada). Bulletin of Geosciences, 84(2). Nunavut Eberle, J.J., et al. (2014). First Record of Eocene Bony Fishes and Crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic. PLoS ONE, 9(5). Francis, J.E. (1988). A Fifty-Million-Year-Old Fossil Forest from Strathcona Fiord, Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada: Evidence for a Warm Polar Climate. Arctic, Vol.41, Number 4. Ontario Armstrong, D.K. and J.E.P. Dodge (2007). Paleozoic Geology of Southern Ontario. Sedimentary Geoscience Section, Ontario Geological Survey, Miscellaneous Release - Data 219. Brookfield, M.E., and C.E. Brett (1988). Paleoenvironments of the Mid-Ordovician (Upper Caradocian) Trenton limestones of southern Ontario, Canada: Storm sedimentation on a shoal-basin shelf model. Sedimentary Geology, 57. Fuentes, S.R. (2003). Faunal Distribution Across the Ordovician-Silurian Boundary in Ohio and Ontario. Masters Thesis - University of Cincinnati. Lehtola, K.A. (1973). Ordovician Vertebrates from Ontario. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.24, Number 4. Stumm, E.C. and J.D. Wright (1958). Check List of Fossil Invertebrates Described from the Middle Devonian Rocks of the Thedford-Arkona Region of Southwestern Ontario. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XIV, Number 7. Verma, H.M. (1979). Geology and Fossils. Craigleith Area, Ontario. Ontario Geological Survey, Guidebook Number 7. von Bitter, P.H., et al. (2007). Eremosa Lagerstatte - Exceptionally preserved soft-bodied biotas with shallow-marine shelly and bioturbating organisms (Silurian, Ontario, Canada). Geology, Vol.35, Number 10. Wright, J.D. and E.P. Wright (1963). The Middle Devonian Ipperwash Limestone of Southwestern Ontario and Two New Brachiopods Therefrom. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XVIII, Number 7. Wright, J.D. and E.P. Wright (1961). A Study of the Middle Devonian Widder Formation of Southwestern Ontario. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XVI, Number 5. Quebec Copper, P. and J. Jin (2012). Early Silurian (Aeronian) East Point Coral Patch Reefs of Anticosti Island, Eastern Canada: First Reef Discovery from the Ordovician/Silurian Mass Extinction in Eastern Laurentia. Geosciences, 2. Cournoyer, M. (2002). Fossils in the vicinity of Montreal. Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections, 17th Annual Meeting, Redpath Museum/McGill University. (Thanks to Oxytropidoceras for finding this one.) Harington, C.R. (2003). Quaternary Vertebrates of Quebec: A Summary. Geographie physique et Quaternaire, Vol.57, Number 1. la Société de Paléontologie du Québec. Twenty Fossil Sites Near Montreal. (Thanks to Oxytropidoceras for finding this one.) Saskatchewan Collom, C.J. (2000). High-resolution Stratigraphy, Regional Correlation, and Report of Molluscan Faunas: Colorado Group (Cenomanian-Coniacian Interval, Late Cretaceous), East-central Saskatchewan. In: Summary of Investigations 2000, Vol.1. Saskatchewan Geological Survey, Sask. Energy Mines, Misc. Rep. 2000-4.1. Cumbaa, S.L., C.J. Underwood and C.J. Schroder-Adams (2013). Paleoenvironments and Paleoecology of the Vertebrate Fauna from a Late Cretaceous Marine Bonebed, Canada. In: Mesozoic Fishes 5 - Global Diversity and Evolution. Arratia, C., H.-P. Schultze and M.V.H. Wilson (eds.), Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil, Munich, Germany. Meijer Drees, N.C., et al. (2002). Lithostratigraphy, Sedimentology, Paleontology, Organic Petrology, and Organic Geochemistry of the Middle Devonian Ashern, Winnipegosis, and Eyot Formations in East-Central Alberta and West-Central Saskatchewan. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 572. Rankin, B.D. (2009). Early late Paleocene mammals from the Roche Percee local fauna, southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Masters Thesis - University of Alberta[/b]. Tokaryk, T.T. and H.N. Bryant (2004). The Fauna from the Tyrannosaurus rex Excavation, Frenchman Formation (Maastrichtian), Saskatchewan. Summary of Investigations 2004, Vol.1, Saskatchewan Geological Survey. Wall, J.H., P. Johnston and T.P. Poulton (2002). Jurassic Microfossils and Bivalves from the Lower Member of the Gravelbourg Formation, Southern Saskatchewan. In: Summary of Investigations 2002, Volume 1. Saskatchewan Geological Survey, Sask. Industry and Resources Misc. Report 2002-4.1. Yukon Matthews, J.V., C.E. Schweger and O.L. Hughes (1990). Plant and Insect Fossils from the Mayo Indian Village Section (Central Yukon): New Data on Middle Wisconsinan Environments and Glaciation. Geographie physique et Quaternaire, Vol.44, Number 1. Poulton, T.P. (1991). Hettangian through Aalenian (Jurassic) Guide Fossils and Biostratigraphy, Northern Yukon and Adjacent Northwest Territories. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 410. Turner, D.G., et al. (2013). Middle to Late Pleistocene ice extents, tephrochronology and paleoenvironments of the White River area, southwest Yukon. Quaternary Science Reviews, 75. Yarnell, J.M. (2000). Paleontology of Two North American Triassic Reef Faunas: Implications for Terrane Paleogeography. Masters Thesis - The University of Montana. Canada - General Allison, C.W. and S.M. Awramik (1989). Organic-Walled Microfossils from Earliest Cambrian or Latest Proterozoic Tindir Group Rocks, Northwest Canada. Precambrian Research, 43. Caldwell, W.G.E. and B.R. North (1984). Cretaceous stage boundaries in the southern Interior Plains of Canada. Bull.geol.Soc. Denmark, Vol.33. Cumbaa, S.L., et al. (2006). Cenomanian Bonebed Faunas from the Northeastern Margin, Western Interior Seaway, Canada. In: Late Cretaceous vertebrates from the Western Interior. (Lucas, S,G. and R.M.Sullivan, eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 35. Fuentes, S.R.(1990). Vertebrates of the Last Interglaciation in Canada: A Review, With New Data. Geographie physique et Quaternaire, Vol. 44, Number 3. Holden, R. (1913). Some Fossil Plants from Eastern Canada. Annals of Botany, Vol.XXVII, Number CVI. McKellar, R.C. and A.P. Wolfe (2010). Canadian Amber. In: Biodiversity of fossils in amber from the major world deposits. Penney, D. (ed.), Siri Scientific Press. Obst, J.R., et al. (1991). Characterization of Canadian Arctic Fossil Woods. In: Tertiary Fossil Forests of the Geodetic Hills, Axel Heiberg Island, Arctic Archipelago, Christie, R.L. and N.J. McMillan (eds.), Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 403. Ollerenshaw, N.C. and L. Reynolds (eds.)(1991). Contributions to Canadian Paleontology. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 412. Middle Ordovician (Chazyan) Stratigraphy and Bryozoan and Conodont Faunas in the Hawkesbury Region, Eastern Ontario. A New Lower Silurian Callocystitid Cystoid from the Lake Timiskaming Region, Northern Ontario. Middle Devonian Goniatites from the Dunedin and Besa River Formations of Northeastern British Columbia. Lower Carboniferous Miospore Assemblages from the Hart River Formation, Northern Yukon Territory. A High Latitude Upper Triassic Flora from the Heiberg Formation, Sverdrup Basin, Arctic Archipelago. Lower Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) Ammonites and Bivalves from the Whitesail Lake Area, West-Central British Columbia. Phillips, A. (2008). A Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Marine Vertebrate-Rich Bioclastic Horizon from the Northeastern Margin of the Western Interior Seaway, Canada. Masters Thesis - Carleton University. Poulton, T.P., et al. (1994). Chapter 18. Jurassic and Lowermost Cretaceous Strata of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. In: Geological Atlas of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. Mossop, G.D. and I. Shetsen (comp.), Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists and Alberta Research Council. (169 MB for Lo-Res version, 526 MB for Hi-Res version).
  4. Hi everyone, I'm brand new to the world of fossils. I didn't even know that you could own a fossil until recently. So far, I have a couple of ammonites and trilobites that I've bought off ebay. I was wondering if anyone knows of anywhere near Perth where I could go looking for fossils. I would love to find one of my own. Thanks so much, Erin
  5. Found in dry river bed of Etobicoke creek, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (upper ordivican) 2 pics here are both sides of the rock the size is roughly 4cm by 5cm.
  6. I have no idea what I'm looking at, but it seems to resemble a spinal column. It was found near Keswick, Ontario, Canada.
  7. Hi! We were at Craigleith, Ontario (Ordovician, lower Whitby formation) today for a toddler's fossil hunt birthday party, and found this neat assemblage of brachiopods, bivalves, and (I am guessing) trilobite bits. At least, they look trilobite to me, but I was hoping someone would be able to explain them. Are they curled up? Could they be part of the larval stage? Something else entirely? I didn't get a scale shot but by my memory I'd say the bits I am trying to figure out are <5mm across each. Thanks! Gavy
  8. I am in the process of writing up a small piece for the university paper with a focus on some of the fossils that are part of the landscaping and architecture. Whereas the landscaping features are all identifiable as local Dundee Fm, I lack the knowledge to pinpoint the formation from which these rocks were quarried, and my investigation has yielded nothing to determine these details. The building was erected in 1993. The limestone used contains several corals (rugose and colonial), some substantially sized gastropods, and nautiloids. It is a light beige, very much mottled by the presence of numerous corals and Thalassinoides. I have my doubts that they would have trucked in the materials from out of province (it is a fairly large building). I am providing a few pictures here and can provide more if needed to ID this formation. The building itself has alternating bands of roughly hewn and saw-cut finished limestone. Some of the specimens in it can be quite large, and a few of the nautiloids present clearly show the siphuncle. I'm not sure if this will be enough to get a more precise ID on the formation, but I appreciate any help! EDIT: Selkirk Member of the Red River Formation, Orodovician. Quarried in Manitoba.
  9. Hello everyone! I went out to my local haunt this past weekend, hoping to find a trilobite, and instead I found another specimen that I had not found up until this point - a coral! It was found at Etobicoke Creek, Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician. I'm thinking that it is a solitary rugose coral - confirmation of this, or a correction if I'm incorrect, would be greatly appreciated! Here are two pictures of the 5cm X 2.5cm specimen: By the way, would it be possible to identify the specimen down to genus or even species, or (a) is it too difficult to fully identify rugose corals without taking sections, or (b) is my particular specimen too squished to be able to identify it any further? Thanks for your help! Monica
  10. It has been reported that complete specimens of this species is rare to find in the formation. The Royal Ontario Museum is said to contain many partials and most come from the former Don Valley Brickyard in Toronto. This specimen was found in Mimico Creek. To see details up close please click the full size button. Reference: Ontario. Department of Mines. The Stratigraphy And Paleontology Of Toronto And Vicinity.
  11. There is nothing quite like a good hike wending around the river through the Carolinian forest ecosystem as the black-eyed susans and goldenrod stand proudly as the mayapples wither, and enormous puffballs appear while chipmunks and squirrels scamper about to hide their finds before winter comes. My goal was to return to an area that looked promising, mostly composed of rounded deposits from when the river was much higher some 7-10,000 years ago. The limestones in this area vary in terms of composition and state of preservation, as well as the deposition of marine critters: some stones will crumble into chips that are filled with large clusters of very tiny brachiopods, while others will have small crinoid columnals, long worm burrows, rugose corals, large-ribbed spirifers (some with very long "wings"), and even the occasional trilobite pygidium. Today's trip did involve getting a bit dirty and sifting through moss, frightening at least one salamander, a few garden snakes, springtails, woodlice, and an arachnophobe's nightmare's worth of large and interesting spiders. As a formation, Dundee is not particularly exciting, and one may feel a bit spoiled in collecting in other formations in the Devonian. Still, it is where I live, and the limestone seems to be the landscaping material of choice around here First up is a fairly well preserved tabulate coral, "front and back."
  12. On Monday Sept. 12 I had some chances to explore zome of parts of the Humber river in Toronto, Ontario, because soon the weather will turn colder and the river waters wont allow exploration. I was walking at a certain part of the Humber river above Bloor St. when I noticed that I could actually see the river's bottom which is made of up shale bedrock. I decided to check the banks from the water. The pictures below were taken when I was in the middle centre of the river where the waters reached up only knee high. Below Bloor St. the water got mucky and there are several marshes lining up the banks of the river. I didn't see any exposures of the Georgian Bay formation at this part and instead I chose to walk north. In addition to discovering the shallowness, I also saw a potential exposure of the Georgian Bay formation, although the exposure could use more erosion to remove all the debris. The area where I discovered the exposure is in a park where all the banks got bulldozed several decades ago to control erosion, which covered most exposures at this park. The exposure revealed limestone layers interbedded with shale. Some of these layers got thicker than 15cm. One limestone layer was fossiliferous which I thought could make some nice hashplates. This limestone layer contained gastropods possibly Hormotoma (?). I have discovered a tiny gastropod hash plate once in Mimico Creek back in 2014 near the mouth. There were also plenty of pelycopods in the layer. I could not recall finding any cephalopods in the entire length of the exposure. A piece of gastropod hash plate I took home. The shells are preserved as internal molds. A Cyrtolites ornatus. I found 2 of these and this was the one I took home. A piece of ramose bryozoa.
  13. PHOTOS ATTACHED I found this along the shore of Lake Ontario, in the small town of Port Hope, Ontario. The stone itself is about 1 1/2 inch wide but the stem-like print is about 3cm long. The circular print is about 0.5cm in diameter. Some sections even seem to have a bit of a shine to them when the rock is shifted from side to side in the light.
  14. I'm still a beginner, and IDing finds is challenging. Anyone able to help me along? This fossil was found in Craigleith, Ontario. Ordovician shale. I didn't have a ruler with me for scale, but it was about 1.5" long and 1/3" wide at the widest point. My first thought was part of a trilobite but after a closer look at the photos it reminds me more of an Orthoceras. Only I have never seen one this small. Please point me in the right direction! Thanks! P.s. I've also attached a photo of our trilobite find. Pseudogygites latimarginatus?
  15. Here is a highly inflated 3-dimensional Homocystites sp that was found this past Saturday May 14 on a very cold rainy day. The only bright note to the weather was that the wet matrix made it a bit easier to see the fossils. This is from the Ordovician Verulam formation and was found in a new blast pile from the previous 7 days. The homocystites typically found is Homocystits anatiformis which is found in the Cobourg formation. This species is typically a little smaller and is under review as potentially being a different species. Homocystites has an ovate theca and a fairly long stem (most missing in this specimen). It has a distinct pattern of radiating ridges on the plates that are very geometric in shape. It was prepped in about 5 minutes using low PSI (10) and dolomite in the 200 to 325 mesh range. No airscribing was needed. There is no restoration or repairs. The specimen is 36 mm long with a 27 mm theca (body) It is 11 mm wide and about 5 mm extends out of the matrix . I am considering finishing off the prep by completely exposing the specimen 360 degrees around, essentially making it a free standing on its stem specimen. I have seen a few prepped this way over the years and they are focal points in people display collections. What do you folks think should I take the chance and go for it.
  16. Here is an extremely rare association of a pretty much complete Ceraurus globulobatus trilobite and a ventral partial amecystite echinoderm from the Verulam formation of the Brechin area in Ontario , Canada. Over the next month or so I will be taking a number of forum members and clubs to this area to hunt. Hopefully there will be some nice finds that we can share. This specimen was found by splitting rock at the end of April 2016. We tend to find the best specimens at this locality by splitting rock. the shaley limestone does not weather well once exposed to the elements.The preservation observed is quite typical of the ceraurus from this locality. The exoskeleton is extremely thin and flakey. The preparation was done mostly with very low pressure (8-10 PSI) 320 mesh dolomite . Prep time was about 5 hours over quite a number of days. Some dilute vinac was used to help consolidate the exoskeleton which was just screaming to want to flake off. This is the only time I have ever found an amecystite associated with a complete ceraurus. They are both rare finds in their own right.
  17. On an annual basis we get one day to collect in a pretty amazing quarry in Bowmanville Ontario. This year 2015 was no exception. My buddy Dave here on the forum had a pretty amazing day. I suspect many of us would kill for even one of the specimens he found that day. I just realized that I have never posted how his fossils turned out. Turns out he is popping by this weekend to pick them up before a mineral and fossil show up in Peterborough Ontario. Fossil Forum member Northern Sharks is a very active member of the club (Kawartha) that is holding the event. Here are Dave's finds for the day as found. They are all isotelus A pretty damaged isotelus .... but a large one A nice Double Another nice double A nice single
  18. Well once again, what is becoming an annual trip to St. Mary's cement in Bowmanville Ontario Canada was an absolute winner this weekend. This is a world class collecting locality that unfortunately is generally not available for regular collecting. A number of forum members were present but a big hats off thanks to our very own Northern Sharks (Kevin) for leading and organizing the trip this year. This is the only day in the year that the very active quarry with 5 levels is open for collecting. Approximately 30 collectors took advantage of this and made it a very special day. The weather was amazing for late October and not a drop of rain unlike some other years. The quarry was quite muddy as it had rained non stop the previous day but that is a good thing because all the rock piles were nice and clean. I only saw what a few collectors found as Quarryman Dave from the forum here and myself were too busy making then most out of our limited collecting time (9:00 to 4:00PM). We are all here for the trilobites...... I did see complete isotelus, ceraurus (2 species), thaleops and flexicalymenes that were found by people. My saw got a fair bit of use cutting mostly isotelus and a few ceraurus out for people on the 3rd level. I think Dave and I did reasonably well, though we only found isotelus and perhaps a thaleops that were keepers. We did find a lot of partial ceraurus but nothing worth bringing home. Dave found two double isotelus plates and we found a number of complete iso's.... Everything that we found was on level 3 and 4 of the quarry. We did not have time to look at levels 1 and 2 and level 5 seemed a bit too wet and muddy for my liking. From what I heard from a few others nothing of note was found on level 1 or 2 this year. I know Peter Lee spent some of the day up there and he did not find anything but partials from what I recall. Here is the group picture of what we found all unprepped at this point (the trip was only yesterday) We should get a few nice ones out of this batch once I get them prepped. I will try to post some pictures as they get completed but that will not likely be for a while as I have a large backlog of material to prep for myself and others. Other members of the forum that were there please jump in and show us some of what you found. ..........
  19. If I were to go to the Don Valley Brickworks to check out their cliffs, do I need to pay an entrance fee? After all it is a popular place here in Toronto. Do they also happen to have restrictions on fossil hunting at their cliff walls? I know some organization of some sort had hikes at the Don Valley walls every now and then to look for fossils and do I have to join them to be allowed to hunt? Don Valley Brickworks seem very enticing......Not only are there late Ordovician rocks, but also there are ice age rock formations too :drool: (mammoth teeth come into mind) . I'm just curious cuz I'm thinking of making a trip there and I'm also wondering if it's worth going there. Juan
  20. Sometimes you get a very pleasant surprise when you get your finds home and start prepping. I was very fortunate to find two relatively complete Amecystis laevis this Saturday October 31, 2015 up at the JD Quarry near Lake Simcoe, Ontario , Canada. They most likely came out of the very top part of the BobCaygeon formation as they were both found in a recently created pile and not in situ. If not it was from the very bottom of the Verulam This picture because of the lighting used came out a bit blue. I am not the best photographer around. The specimen is on an 85mm * 66mm matrix and is 79 mm long from tip of arm to tip of tail (about 3.1 inches) . The theca on the amecystis is 17mm wide by 22 mm long. The Amecystis is a dorsal orientation. The edrio is approximately 6 mm in diameter. I believe this to be a Amecytis laevis (Raymond) by the way Thanks for the correction Kevin (Northern Sharks) there are definitely no pore rhombohedrons on this specimen. It is a shame that the Amecystis and the edrio both have some slight damage to them from the quarry blasting. But they are still very good specimens. The amecystis is fairly well inflated and nicely colored. Here is a better picture showing the true coloring. But to my surprise it has a very nice attached travelling companion in a edrioasteroid which I believe to be an Isorophusella incondita. What makes this super interesting and probably quite rare is the fact that the edrio is attached to the amecystis and may well have been there when the amecystis was alive. I wonder if anyone else has ever come across this particular association. Edrios are often found attached to brachiopods in this locality. This was prepped using 40 micron dolomite under a zoom scope at 22 PSI using a Comco .018 high precision nozzle on a Comco air abrasion unit.
  21. This week I got my monthly TTC Monthly Metropass for the first time ever and so with this card in my wallet I was excited that I had unlimited freedom to use the transit to go wherever I want in the city of Toronto for the whole September. Yesterday, while travelling with my card in wallet in Scarborough after finishing an assessment, I came across a creek right at Progress Drive and went down to explore it, in hopes of coming across the Whitby formation. I had seen bits of information regarding outcrops of the Whitby in Scarborough on the net, and I took this opportunity to explore as I live far away from Scarborough. I went down on a driveway I found behind a building and descended below to the bottom. From the edge of the creek I saw no exposures of the Whitby formation but instead saw outcrops of sand, a bit similar to what I saw at the Don Valley Brickworks. Some of the outcrops' bottom were ridden with overgrowth, so I chose the one that had the least, which was this one. The highest point of this outcrop would be around three storeys high and streches for several metres. There's also a substantial sediment material that has fallen off at the bottom and the vegetation on the bottom isn't as thick.
  22. From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto

    Endoceras proteiforme, found in the Humber river area. Late Ordovician, Georgian Bay formation, Toronto, Ontario. Length is approximately 35 cm long with a nickel shown. This specimen is a portion of the whole fossil that is still to be excavated (it's just so difficult to dig out) and the remaining body of this thing is still there at the site where I got this.

    © (©)

  23. The first major event to wash the creek was the nasty February winter we had in the city. Let's recall the ice that melted and went down the creek back in March. Then fast forward to June. I believe the city had rain during the first 2 straight weeks of June in which I remember seeing many creeks being flooded continuously for several days. Then gradually the rain stopped, I waited for some time to give the creek's water level to drop low again, and that's when I set off to visit the ravines of Mimico Creek.
  24. From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto

    Isotelus maximus (Locke, 1838). Curled specimen that would have been complete if the head wasn't missing. Spotted among rubble and the first big Isotelus specimen I've found at the Humber River area . Toronto, Ontario. Late Ordovician, Georgian Bay formation. Nickel at the bottom for scale.

    © (©)

  25. From the album Fossils from my collection!

    These 2 Gastropods are from Miller Mineral Quarry, Temiskaming Shore, Ontario, Canada / Late Ordovician / Found them myself few weeks ago!