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Found 1,110 results

  1. Unknown ordovician fossil

    I foud these two stones on a fossil hunting trip some weeks ago. The fossil on the below stone seems to be a gastropod (size about 3 cm), but is the other a sponge? Anyone have an idea? Both are from middle ordovicium, Oslo-field in Norway. Martin
  2. Conodont elements scale

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    Field of view at 40x magnification in red circle.
  3. Shark-like denticles (1)

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    Possible early shark or shark-like denticles. Magnification 40x.
  4. Shark-like denticles (2)

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    Possible early shark or shark-like denticles. Magnification 40x + iPhone zoom.
  5. Astraspis desiderata (2)

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    These star-like tubercles give Astraspis its name. Magnification 40x + iPhone zoom.
  6. Conodont elements

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    Magnification 40x.
  7. Chirognathus sp. conodont element

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    Magnification 40x + iPhone zoom.
  8. Astraspis desiderata (1)

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    Armor plates with odontodes/tubercles. Magnification 40x + iPhone zoom.
  9. Harding Sandstone micromatrix (3)

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    Magnification 40x.
  10. Harding Sandstone micromatrix (2)

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    A closer view of the micromatrix in the vial.
  11. Harding Sandstone micromatrix (1)

    From the album Harding Sandstone

    Concentrated microfossil matrix from the Harding Sandstone.
  12. Harding Sandstone Microfossils

    Back in May or so I got my hands on some micromatrix from the Harding Sandstone, CO, USA. This formation dates back to the Ordovician: ~450-475 mya. It's chock full of some really cool and important fossils. It has some of the earliest vertebrate material, and some of the earliest steps in the evolution of teeth! I hope this is an informative and fun look into an important period in life's history. If you feel I have mischaracterized something or have left out pertinent information, please do speak up! I do also plan to post more pictures as I sort through material. If there's something specific you would like a better view of, let me know. So without further ado, let's dive in! All the matrix I have came in this small vial (not all of it is in the vial - this is just what I still have to go through). It's been heavily concentrated. What you're seeing is a mix of shells, some sandstone bits, and vertebrate remains. The majority of the vertebrate material is from ostracoderms - armored fish whose skin was made of bone. They had no jaws, teeth, or fins. They look to me like a cross between an armadillo and a potato. Most of the fossils are of their skin-armor which was studded with "tubercles:" little bumps and ridges. These are important and we'll talk about them later. Also in the mix are scales from potentially the earliest sharks. It seems there is still debate on this, as they could also belong to another class of fish named the thelodonts. There are also the well-preserved "teeth" of conodonts. Conodonts were jawless, bug-eyed, hagfish-like animals.
  13. Looking for help with Trilobite ID

    I find myself unable to attach a species/genus name to the pair of trilobite pygidia I found in the Ibex area of Utah. The closest I can get is Ectenaspis judging from the form. The plate of two pygidia were found in the float of the Wah-Wah and Fillmore formations. They are weathered with some shell material, but not enough to see terracing or effacement. Found near the top of the ridge, they have to be Ordovican, but I can't be positive which formation it was situated. This genus is well know from the Maquoketa of Iowa and Decorah of Wisconsin, but I find no examples from elsewhere. A little help if someone has info. Thanks.
  14. From the album Ordovician

    Isoteles gigas Partial pygidium and thorax of Asaphidae Trilobite (5 inches long) Middle Ordovician Denley Formation Poland Member Trenton Group Little Falls, N.Y.
  15. Orthoceras I

    Hi! A recent walk in the woods resulted in the discovery of this nautiloid. I found it in Wilson County, TN which is Ordovician. I am super excited about this because we found it in the woods on the property where I grew up, which means I probably walked past it a million times, and it's 3D so it shows the the siphuncle, and the outside of the phragmocone. We did not have anything to measure it with but I would estimate it to be about 12cm (5in). So my questions are these: I think first verify what I think this is and what I see as I am new to this. I have looked around the internet for genus/species of Orthoceras found in TN, but can't find anything, does anyone know? The fossil is covered with moss, what is the best way to clean it without breaking anything (once we drag this monster rock out of the woods and to the house)? Thank you so much for opinion/advice/help!
  16. Hello to all! Hope everyone is doing well, cause after my recent finds I am definitely doing well . So a little backstory: 10 years ago in grade school when I used to collect fossils with my father, we would never find any good fossils in shale. Always layer upon layer of the bland gray rocks with nothing even close to a fossil. For the longest time I never even bothered glancing at the large sections of shale dotting the many rivers of Toronto. jump ahead to the beginning of the month when I read some posts from @JUAN EMMANUEL showing some very nice nautiloids from shale. At first I didn't think anything of it and figured I'd never find anything THAT nice in shale. But, jump to a week later: While exploring a new location, I happen across a large section of layered shale on the riverbank and figured I'd try my luck - and started doing some digging. I pretty quickly came across a shell. A second shell. Then a third, fourth, fifth, and after chipping back the layer I found dozens of very tightly knit shells to my surprise. I was shocked to find anything after thinking for years that Toronto shale held almost nothing of interest. But still - they were ambonychia shells which I already have plenty of in my collection. So I keep looking around and chipping away at other layers, thinking maybe I'll find something a little more exciting. An hour goes by while digging in a somewhat awkward position, and my legs start to fall asleep so I readjusted my legs and out of the corner of my eye I noticed something right near my knee. My heart absolutely skipped a beat as I realized what I had found: A perfect and complete trilobite in the shale. After taking a closer look I realized there was in fact TWO of them right near each other! I hadn't found a trilobyte of this quality since grade school when I used to go with my father - let alone two. I just sat there for about 2 minutes staring at them, thinking they were going to shatter as soon as my pick got anywhere near them. Ultimately, luck played in my favour and the trilobites came out perfectly! But, the story doesn't end there, oh no! So now I'm going back to all these old places, primed with the fresh new knowledge of how to hunt shale. Although the work is pretty messy and uncomfortable, it seems to pay off quite nicely. And before I know it, a couple days later I end up finding yet another trilobite. But the crown jewel of the month came last weekend when I found two different nautiloids - one being an absolute MONSTER specimen, and the other being my most complete nautiloid ever (it even included the tip at the very end!). I just gotta give a big thanks to the people on this forum. Without the knowledge shared on this forum, I would likely have still been stuck in my ways avoiding any piece of shale in sight. I also have also included some other fossils that I found this month. [All fossils found in Humber, Etobicoke and Mimico river/creeks riverbanks - located in Toronto ON, Canada // Georgian Bay Formation // Ordovician (485.4 - 443.8Ma)] The first set of trilobites In Situ from humber river. The first two trilobites on the left and the later one on the right. The many pieces of nautiloid that came out during extraction. They unfortunately broke VERY easily so I figured there was no point stressing about it coming out in less than a dozen pieces. Here is what it looked like when all the pieces were assembled together (with the help of a little super glue of course). It even seems to have the very tip of the nautiloid as well (which would be a first for me)! here are a couple other decent pieces I found as well:
  17. Today I joined a local club on a trip to a dolomite quarry (Ordovician, Galena Group) in northern Illinois. This was the first trip of the year as the rest have been cancelled. The quarry was quite massive, so social distancing was not a problem. We hunted in rock piles in the middle of the quarry (very far from the high walls) that were scheduled for crushing. It was quite a beautiful place. Besides some hammering, all I heard were large birds that were circling above. The fossils found here are pretty standard for the Ordovician rocks in the area. The Galena Group here seems to be a lot more dolomized than further north in say Minnesota, so most of what is found are molds. Fisherites were somewhat common. They were quite massive so I only took home a small chunk of one I broke up. The most abundant fossils were these gastropods, I think Maclurites. They were everywhere but rarely came out complete. Hormotoma gastropods were also present. I believe this is a cranidia of the trilobite Thaleops.
  18. Ordovician trilobite

    Going through old stuff and found this. Measures 1cm.Platteville formation(?), WI. Any ideas?
  19. A huge Hungaiidae trilobite from Hunan Fenxiang Formation, Lower Ordovician. Part of gut is preserved due to infilled sediment.
  20. Grass or worm?

    Well im really new and just now taking interest in fossiles. Found this in eastern ky under a red line of rock(Side note was that a iron rich comet?). Looks like a coral, worm,or snake to me any info would be great. Sorry if i did this all wrong
  21. Fezouata Mystery.........

    Hello, friends. Can anyone give me a helping hand identifying this, please? Not the Asaphellus trilobite, but the other object. This is Moroccan Fezouata, so Early Ordovician. Notice the thoracic segments curve the opposite way to most trilobites. It is convex on both sides, though seemingly a bit flattened. It has a 'flange' on one side of the anterior and presumably had one on the other side. Bit of a trilo? Aglaspid? Xiphosurid? Some sort of echinoderm? Any guesses most welcome. Thank you very much. Scale here in inches : Removed a little more matrix. Scale here in cm. This shows the trilobite better! Thanks again. Cheers, Adam and Tidgy.
  22. Unknown Ordovician Fossils

    Hey I am currently going through and reorganizing my collection when I came across these that have no Id information, I was wondering if I could get some help with these fossils. The first was sent to me by a friend in Montreal, QC, and was collected on the south shore. Other than that, no information came with it. I think its an endocast from a snail shell. The second and third I collected personally, and they are from the Hull formation in Ottawa, ON. The second is a brachiopod, but I don't know the species. Finally, the third is also from the same site, and is about 2 cm long. When I first recorded it I labeled it as a split snail shell, but I'm questioning that now. Thanks in advance for your help everyone.
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