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Found 31 results

  1. I am back from my trip to morocco. It is a 14 days trip and I got 4 days for fossil hunting. It was so imagine, fossils are everywhere and even though I won't be able to dig, I still get plenty to bring home. Since my guide doesn't speak good English, I am not be able to ask him must so I need help to identify the fossil. On the first day, my guide took me to a place near Erfoud to search for dinosaur teeth. It is very close to the highway. We found a well that the local people dig to get Spinosaur teeth and bone. My husband went down to one but couldn't find anything because the well is new and it is not deep enough. We didn't want to try the deeper one so we decide to bought some spinosaur teeth from the local people there. This tooth is a little over 4.5 inches and I think there are some prepare but I can't tell how much. I also bought 3 smaller teeth and was giving the broken one which I don't know what it is.
  2. From the album Invertebrates

    Orthoceras sp., completely overgrown by Favosites sp. Early Devonian Emsian Bundenbach Germany Length 30cm
  3. So the beach was recently excavated and what was covered by the ocean for so many years, dried out and the sand was excavated and made into huge dunes full of old seashells and mysterious oysters and conches. I found many bivalves and i stumbled upon this weird stone that is covered in fossil like formations and shells. Any idea what it could be? Is it a fossil? Is it extinct? Its driving me NUTS.
  4. After a bust season in Florida for the Peace River, it has been way too high. I am excited to be planning a trip back to Newberry, Mi. Two years ago when I was there, I was able to collect at a degrading hill side east of the town. There is a quarry of Collingwood Shale south of the town, but I was fortunate to find drift cobbles, and some Collingwood Shale on a friends property. Last time I found several nice impressions of Pseudogygites , mostly just the pygidium. I also found a couple of kinds of graptolites, and brought back a 4 inch thick, 16" long slab of shale with a nice orthoceras impression on the top. As i began salivating about my new trip, I returned to the shale and decided to split it, hoping I would not break the orthoceras impression on top. Well I am glad I did. It was such an interesting afternoon. One of the splits revealed just a fine grain layer of dark mud, with nothing in it. That was the middle split. Then I split each of those halves...in the have below the clean layer, I saw lots of little white dots...ranging from 1/32 of an inch to 1/16...Turns out they are braciapods. I captured a photo of one of the largest, and in it, the hinge even shows. Amazing. On the the half lying between my orthoceras impression on top of the clean grainy mud. Excitement. And drum roll please. I popped open what appears to be a small orthoceras, but perhaps it is a conularid, can't really tell. The exciting thing for me was the preservation. It has a nice decomposition blow ring of color around it, deriving from the decomposition gasses. I learned that from studying my Conasauga trilobites. And then it has some nice detail indicating structure. I was really excited. In the photo of the two halves, one looks larger because it is closer to the camera. On the other side, the top of this piece, my orthoceras was preserved, but a little chip from the side revealed a nice graptolite. A bit more might be revealed, but my previous experience with graptolites. precludes that...I don't plan to touch it. I found so many of them last time, I played around to see if they would be cleaned up....not the ones I have, they just break apart at the slightest touch. So overall, I feel like I am experiencing my trip once again, and I hope to be able to post new photos in June after I return. First photo is the little brachiopod (unknown type). Second photo is the Collingwood shale after splitting. Third photo is the two halves in same photo. Fourth photo is half A - fifth is half B
  5. Fossil hunting in Norway

    this year's first hunt was not entirely successful. There is still a meter of snow in some places. Found some small fossils that I don't think are possible to identify. I may show pictures of them, but saw several large orthoceras and some trilobites in a mountain wall where the snow was melted (exposed to the sun). May have to wait a few weeks, after Easter before i can go fossilhunting. The area where i took these pictures is called fossildalen/fossilvalley in slemmestad. The fossils here in the area stem from the time periods of Cambrian, Ordovician and Silur, a period of 541 million to 419 million years ago. At that time, Slemmestad was a seabed in a relatively shallow sea. The Orthoceras fossils i took pictures of is about 420 million years old.
  6. Day Two ; Locality One (or Six if you include Day One) Black Sahara, South of Erfoud 20th February 2019 Well this is where things really get interesting, so stick with this thread as there are dozens of photos of fossils coming up. Looks at the tags if you want clues. I was up bright and early and wandered out at about 7 am to watch the sun rise over the still mighty Erg Chebbi dunes. And as night's candles were burnt out and jocund day stood tiptoe over the misty duney tops, the chaps came to join me and managed lots of photos. Here's one, if you would like to see more, I'm busy posting a kazillion of 'em under the Nature Photography thread.
  7. Othoceras Sp - Noth West of France.

    From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    Othoceras Sp from North West of France (silurian)
  8. I just got this orthoceras fossil from the atlas mountains if Morocco. I was wondering if they was a formation associated with it? I've got the age, but not the formation, if any. Thanks, Tyler
  9. Balteurypterus tetragonophtalmus + Ortoceras. Newest addition to my collection.
  10. Orthoceras Fossil

    An Orthoceras fossil from Beckham's Barn. Any idea which species it is?
  11. Orthoceras squid tail fossils

    Can anyone shed some light on how these fossils, which are often seen in either single specimens or large slabs, ..how they are polished to such a clear diplay, and then on the back side there is normally a similar fine cut, but with a very bad finish. Also, i find that these fossils are ussually all the same color, this is due to the fossilization conditions such as, materials, region, era, ect... Correct? Also peculiar that they often do not contain other traces of the organism.
  12. Orthoceras sp. colonised with Bryozoa

    From the album Invertebrates

    Orthoceras sp. colonised with Bryozoa Early Devonian Emsian Bundenbach Rhineland-Palatinate Germany
  13. Orthoceras sp.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Orthoceras sp. Early Devonian Early Emsian Bundenbach Germany
  14. Cephalopod Shell Color!

    Hello all! Recently I have been obsessed with cephalopods and realized there is a real lack of reconstructions of the color patterns on extinct nautiloids and ammonites! This led me to compile a list of known fossil color patterns on cephalopods. After a year of on and off research, I found about 90 species of cephalopods retaining official or undescribed, original patterning on their shells. These are the first 15 species on my list. The color markings are based both on descriptions and photographs of the fossil material. The shades of the markings are based on the fossils, but also inferred. I Hope you will appreciate my work!
  15. Devonian cephalopod plate

    A few months back I managed to get a whole piece of one of the layers that delivered cephalopods. I took the whole rock back home spotting only a few posible cephalopods. After the prep work this is how it looked in the beginning: multiple Goniatites and orthocones on 1 plate: ( Manticoceras, Sphearomanticoceras, Orthoceras ) Late Devonian ( Frasnian ) Chimay area ( Belgium) after a little work:
  16. Cephalopods, Orthoceras

    Hi folks, due to my recent infatuation with the trilobites, I've neglected the other plowed area where the orthoceras are found (and virtually nothing else, btw). It has rained a few times so I walked through the patch and picked these up this morning. Have a great weekend ALL !
  17. "Inside" orthoceras

    Hi folks, found this orthoceras this morning. Both pieces were relatively close to one another, (rarely happens) There is a strange inhabitant residing inside. Do you recognize it ? I'm experimenting with photos through a microscope. Hope they are clear enough. The second find today is another one I haven't seen yet. I assume it is a cephalapod but the sutures are very close together, unlike the others I've found here. They are only 0.5mm (0.02") apart. It is basically round and tapered like the others also. Thanks
  18. Hi folks, We had a nice rain last night. Walked around the upper yellow shale garden and found these rinsed off lying on the surface. Sort of strange, this is (practically) the only fossil I've found here in this spot. Just 200 yds. away is my other dig site that has all of the other examples I've posted, but none of the orthoceras has been found there. I suppose there are many layers separating them, makes me wonder what the timeline would be relating to the different exposed areas. The bulk of the orthoceras seems to be in one end of my current tilling. Soon I plan to extend the plowed area a bit further up the ridge in search of higher concentrations. Cheers.
  19. Orthoceras find

    Hi folks, Rocky again. We had a nice shower this eve., walked the yellow shale plowed area and found these tidbits rinsed off. The longer one is the best orthoceras segment that I've found here so far. Also found the delicate little arrowhead. But as usual, it is broken. This is the first rain since the tilling. I'm hopeful (and confident) that more will pop up after several more rains and another tilling ... or 2. Kind regards.
  20. Found this fossil at a fossil quarry in ohio, maybe you guys can help identify these fossils.
  21. Orthoceras?

    Found this badly worn specimen in a Hunt TX creek bank and believe it is an Orthoceras. Thought?
  22. Random Assortment

    From the album My Collection

    This is the final shelf in my display case. This is a complete random assortment of fossils (Basically, whatever didn't fit on other shelves due to space got put here). This shelf features everything from Megalodon teeth to a cave bear digit
  23. Last weekend I had again a field trip to my favorite location in the area of Couvin. We went to the quarry with a geology club, around 20 participants came to the meeting point. Everyone got a quick briefing of the geology and paleontology of the quarry and the usual safety instructions before going down in the quarry. Once at the interesting spot we noted a few changes: a pile of gray nodular limestone was freshly excavated. In those boulders a few of us found large well preserved goniatites. I had the chance to find a nice one from around 8cm in diameter. After a careful examination of the boulder I went on top of the quarry to dig out a layer yielding small cephalopods ( orthoceras, manticoceras and bactrites ) I had to dig whit a heavy pickaxe, but I was able to clear a decent part of that layer for me and a couple of the other searchers. The hard work paid off, I found around 20 goniatites and a whole bunch of orthocones, most of them are waiting for a cleanup and prepwork. While leaving the quarry I saw a piece of shell sticking out of a stone, a lucky split of that rock turned out to reveal a large Goniatite with beautiful suture lines. This one will require some extra prepwork, but it looks very promising.
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