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Found 752 results

  1. Arizona Pennsylvanian Naco fossil

    Hello! Yesterday I did some collecting near Pine, AZ from a site known for shallow water, shelf marine fossils. This is the Pennsylvanian Naco formation. I found something with an odd shape encased in limestone, so I soaked it in diluted muriatic acid over night. I am stumped as to what this might be? Any help is appreciated! Thank you.
  2. Carboniferous fossil ID

    I have this fossil here which at first glance I perceived to be some kind of seed, however I’m not sure. These are both from the same individual, just the positive and negative sides. It is just shy of half an inch long. It was found in the North Attleboro section of the Rhode Island formation
  3. Seed Cone

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Early Conifer Fruit/Seed Body about 4" long Pennsylvanian Age (308-300 MY) Lewellyn Formation Columbia County, PA The impression is coated in white iron oxide left from original plant material during fossilization.
  4. Calling Palebotanists!

    Ya know, I'm great at plant identification if it's currently growing in my region. Dive back to the Paleozoic and I can tell Calamites from Cordaites, but that's about my limit without a book in hand. So far, I've had 8 and I still don't know what this is! I'm pondering the frond-like object running diagonally across the center of the picture. It looks like a fruiting body from Cordaites, but it lacks the sporophyll. It also resembles Corynepteris angustissima, but the only illustration I can find lacks sufficient detail. This came from a mid-late Pennsylvanian Lewellyn Formation exposure in Columbia County, PA. It's about 4 inches (10cm) long.
  5. Omphalophloios Sp. Lesquereux Pennsylvanian Arborescent, 310 Mya old, Pella Beds, Pella, Iowa Omphalophloios is a genus of fossil lycopsid trees in the Carboniferous system.
  6. Carboniferous fish tooth?

    I found this in a phosphatic nodule from the Mecca Quarry Shale (Middle Pennsylvanian) of Illinois. It's pretty jumbled, perhaps as a result of digestion. My first reaction was that this is the base of a fish tooth, but I am not positive. Any thoughts?
  7. I found this rock alone under a tree, so I'm pretty skeptical of it, but I'm also pretty curious. I looked up trace fossils that might look like this, and I thought it was pretty similar to Rusophycus. The rocks around it are from the Glenshaw and Cassleman Formations of late carboniferous Pittsburgh. The "print" is about 10 cm long in its entirety, and maybe a quarter cm deep or so. Could this be a print of sorts or is it just some funky weathering? Thanks!
  8. I recently found several fossil plant impressions inside nodules from Indiana coal mine spoil dumps. It is Pennsylvanian age approximately 300 mya. Please help identify the specimens to genus, and species if possible. Thanks!
  9. Pennsylvanian Fossil?

    I found this near a small creek in the Casselman Formation right outside of Pittsburgh. It was originally covered in some sort of black matrix, most of which I scraped off. It really looks like a piece of bone (maybe a tibia or a radius?) to me, but I might just be crazy. Thanks!
  10. Possible vertebrate from Mazon Creek

    Pretty sure this is some sort of animal with a notochord but not sure. My fossil friends so far have suggested early amphibian, lamprey, or shark. Given that its from the Francis Shale of Mazon Creek I would think it unlikely to be an amphibian however. I specialize in Neoaves so this is a bit out of my expertise, but I'm pretty sure I've found something amazing!
  11. To day I decided to take a vacation day and stay around the house, but my wife told me that I was getting in her way and why don't I go fossil collecting. So with that, I was off on a 130 mile round trip to Oglesby, Illinois to look around at a road cut that exposes the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone member of the Bond Formation. I have visited this site a number of times before and have prepared trip reports on my finds. I believe I say on every post that this is not a site for young kids and as adults you need to watch yourself for possible falling rocks or falling on the scree that is made up of larger pieces. In my opinion, this site is best visited in the early spring and late fall, when all of the vegetation is dead, it make foot placement a lot easier and really opens up the site, which is not very big. Shortly after I arrived at the site, another car pulled up and a man got out who identified himself as Roy Plotnick. The name was familiar to me, but I could not pinpoint where from, but I knew it was fossil related. Dr. Roy Plotnick is a Professor Emeritus from the University of Illinois at Chicago (Invertebrate Paleobiology and Paleontology), like me, he was just out for a day of collecting. We talked about several topics, including Mazon Creek fossils, and I had mentioned Richardson's Guide to The Fossil Fauna of Mazon Creek book and he stated that he authored the chapter on Eurypterids, and that was when it clicked where I heard his name. We both collected for about 1 hour and then we went on our separate ways. I did not find anything special today and to be honest, this was the least amount of fossils that I ever collected on a trip, here are some finds and pics of the area, Roy and one of me. I asked him to take a picture of me since I usually collect by myself and never end up in pictures. Roy Plotnick- Your's Truly- Pictures of the area- You have to watch out for the branches with the thorns on them, they are deadly. I found this cute little snake hanging around. Composita argentia- Linoproductus cora- Juresania nebrascensis- Crinoid discs- Hash Plate- Something odd and crystal filled, but think it is geological and not fossil. If I am wrong, let me know. I left this piece on site, but I know where it is.
  12. Stigmaria

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Root of a Lepidodendron (scale tree) with rootlets radiating out at right angles along both sides. The white powder highlighting the imprint is iron oxide, most likely pyrophyllite, left over from the actual plant. Lewellyn Formation (same formation that runs through St. Claire) Lackawanna County, PA Pennsylvanian age
  13. Fellow WIPS member Shellie Luallin, who is expert in 3D imaging of fossils https://sketchfab.com/Paleogirl recently imaged a presumed Pennsylvanian blastoid of mine from Cherokee County, OK and generously made it available as a free download: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/pentremites-rusticus-e729f54539014770b0128b000fca841b Note the very pronounced interambulacral areas (deltoids) where the hydrospires are developed. Katz (1978) https://www.jstor.org/stable/1303971?seq=1 lumped exisiting variants into one species P. rusticus based on hydrospire similarity Given that this distinctive morphologic end member is stratigraphically restricted and present a population, perhaps this conclusion should be revisited.
  14. I was fortunate to be able to take two trips recently to the Marmaton group in Northern Missouri and wanted to share my trip report with the forum. It's hard to find information on the Marmaton in Missouri, and I struggled with the geology and understanding what members within the Marmaton I was seeing, but I had a great time non the less. I grew up in this region and have some ‘insiders’ information on a few spots I wanted to check out just from spending time running around the countryside as a kid. The first was in a local creek in the township I grew up in that contains concretions we called ‘dragon eggs.’ I was curious if they would contain fossils so on my first trip in early September I committed to breaking one open. First, here are a few pictures of the site: I was able to break this one open, and it did contain fossils! The blue line on the lower left marks a very thin layer of limestone that the concretions seem to form right above. Here are a few more pictures of the concretions for reference. A particularly large one: And one that is just cracked: Unfortunately for me only the very first one I broke had any fossils. I spent several hours hoping another would reveal some but luck was against me at that point I guess and I failed to find a single one. Frustrated I spent the remainder of the evening searching through the fallen limestone exposures. The next post will contain some of the specimens from the single fossiliferous concretion and the limestone.
  15. Back to the Ohio Valley

    Hi Everyone, I took a 2 week trip to the Ohio Valley, arriving back in New York about a week ago. It was primarily a family visit since many of my relatives now reside in the Elizabethtown, KY area. However, the Ohio Valley, as some of you know, is very rich in Paleozoic fossils and I just had to make a few stops on my way there and back as well as between family engagements. I will try to share enough to give you all a gist of it: It was a long day's drive from the northern suburbs of New York City to Richmond, Indiana where I spent the first night. The next day I was headed down State Road 101 to Garr Hill, to collect in the Upper Ordovician Liberty Formation. It was my first time at the site and everything I found was collected from loose rocks at or near the base of the outcrop. A couple of pictures:
  16. I'm going to be taking a drive this year from Pittsburgh to Charlottesville to SE Kentucky, to Knoxville, TN to catch some of the autumn foliage, and was wondering if anyone had any suggestion on fossilized foliage outcrops or spoils piles. I'm trying to focus on ferns and other plants, as I've collected a lot of marine fossils previously and want to get some new types of specimens. I've seen some stuff online about Ambridge, PA and Big Hill in KY, but haven't been able to find too many other public spots besides that. Just wondering if anyone had any suggestions or recommendations. Thanks.
  17. Pennsylvanian trilobite ID

    I was going through my trilobite pygidiums and cephalons from the Winterset of the Pennsylvanian Kansas City group and I found this cephalon that seems different from the others I have. In particular, the genal spine seems curved. In the photos you can see both the internal mold and, in the other half of the split, the inside of the shell. I assume the pygidium beside it is belongs to the same creature, but I could be wrong. Any help with the ID will be appreciated. Russ
  18. While I have been out fossil hunting a bit in the Texas Summertime heat I am still having great fun with the Micro Matrix- it sure is pleasant to sit in the AC and poke about for fossils! I had some great little finds in the Mineral Wells matrix, but i am just amazed by the Bridgeport matrix. Even though it's still Pennsylvanian, it's very different from the MIneral Wells stuff! Different formations and all..... What's really neat about the Bridgeport matrix is firstly - it's bigger, typically. and secondly...it's COLORFUL! Reds and golds and purply browns and oranges. It's really lovely stuff!! Here are some of my favorites from the Jasper Creek formation. : First the Echinoid bits - I love these little "cat ghost" plates. 2 mm Most of the spines were incomplete, but I found a nice base and a nice spine, just not all one piece 7mm base and 1 cm spine A funky Echinoid plate 7 mm So many neat Crinoid fragements - arms, cup fragements, columnals, etc! All of these are aprox 5-8 mm except the first one which is a honking 1.5 cm. ) And this crazy crinoid spine that was broken and was regenerating before it died...hence the "dimple" on the end. Thanks fellow Forum Members for helping with that ID! 1 cm Love this crinoid column...I think it's my favorite. It's so Art Deco.....about 3 million years early. 1 cm Some other nice/ interesting finds Neospirifer Brachiopod 5 mm Not sure what this is...I assume a brachiopod. 5 mm Colorful Bryzoans 4 mm Bryzoan on a Crinoid 8 mm Girtycoelia sponges Each are aprox 5-8 mm Gastropods: Pseudozygopleura 4mm Possilbly a Phymataopleura? Not sure of ID 5 mm Possibly Goniasma? 5mm And then there's this thing......a bryzoan encrusting a sponge! 1 cm
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