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Found 1,043 results

  1. Unknown Florida Mammal Tooth

    Hello, I have positively identified three other teeth today by looking through the FF gallery and UF Florida Museum collections. This tooth is different from the Equus examples. I could not match it up with camel either. Some of you have incredible collections. Fossil collected from retention pond spoils in North Port, FL. Hole depth 5-10 feet below sea level. Area near Little Salt Spring. Thank you in advance for your knowledge. Regards, Michael
  2. Pleistocene Tooth

    Found on the Brazos River just west of Richmond, Texas. My best guess is Equus sp. judging by how flat it is, but any confirmations or other suggestions are welcome. Unfortunately the occlusal surface is extremely worn down, so identification may be difficult. If anyone knows exactly what tooth it is (such as location in the mouth) that would be very helpful too. Thanks for looking!
  3. Venice Florida Tortoise Advice

    Hello, I live in between Venice and North Port, FL, close to the Myakka. I have been finding tortoise fossils/clasts in my neighborhood. Most are in moist clay within a foot from surface. This location is SW of the Peace River Formation. I find deer antler, Meg teeth, and manatee ribs fully fossilized here also. This is Pleistocene area. I have not found fully fossilized tortoise. Mine are not totally solidified. I find many scutes/ spurs along with the clasts that are hardened. Looking for advice. Photos of one sample attached. Regards, Michael
  4. Venice Florida Tortoise Advice

    Hello, I live in between Venice and North Port, FL, close to the Myakka. I have been finding tortoise fossils/clasts in my neighborhood. Most are in moist clay within a foot from surface. This location is SW of the Peace River Formation. I find deer antler, Meg teeth, and manatee ribs fully fossilized here also. This is Pleistocene area. I have not found fully fossilized tortoise. Mine are not totally solidified. I find many scutes/ spurs along with the clasts that are hardened. Looking for advice. Photos of one sample attached. Regards, Michael
  5. Fossil ID Assistance

    Found on surface spoils after pond excavated. Venice, FL , 15 miles southwest of Peace River Formation. Depth was no greater than 15 feet. Possibly Arcadia formation. Pleistocene epoch. Fossil is very dense and smooth. I have found many fossils in this area but none this color or density. Note: striations on last 2 images. Looking forward to learning and sharing some other finds.
  6. Brazos River Pleistocene Bone

    Found this big chunk of bone on one of the gravel bars in the Brazos last week while the water was still low enough to walk around. I have a strong suspicion that it's part of the proximal end of a bison metacarpal, as that's the only thing that it seems to resemble in pictures I've compared it to online, but if someone more knowledgable in these things than myself could confirm (or completely disprove me, that's welcome too!) that would be great.
  7. Texas City Dike Bison Tooth?

    One of the only fossils I managed to find at the Texas City dike this weekend, which is well-known as a site for Pleistocene fossils from the Beaumont Clay formation that are pulled to the surface during dredging operations in the nearby shipping channel. I know this tooth isn't Equus, so maybe bison? Any help would be appreciated!
  8. Texas Pleistocene Rib Bones

    I was searching the gravel bars in the Brazos River just southeast of Houston almost every day last week before the storm hit this weekend. Now the water's too high to look, but I found a pretty good assortment of fossilized Pleistocene aged bones during my trips. Most of what I've found have been fragments that are totally unidentifiable, but a handful still have some significant features that could lead to an ID. These two are both rib bones, but that's about all I know. The first one I initially thought was from a modern cow due to how clean it was, but after picking it up it was clear that it's definitely a fossil - it's mineralized all the way through and has a decent weight to it. The only animals of that size that could produce such a large rib that I can think of off the top of my head would be either bison or hoses. The second bone also looks like a rib, but a lot smaller than the first. It has two deep grooves on either side that seem to match up with pictures I've seen of the origin point in deer and horse ribs where the bone begins to branch away from the vertebral column. As always, any help would be appreciated!
  9. Unidentified Pleistocene Mammal tooth

    I found this tooth fragment in the ocean while vacationing at Englewood, Florida. I need help determining if this is in fact a tooth fragment and what animal it may have came from. My money is on Equus. Thank you
  10. Florida Pleistocene Equus tooth?

    Hello again TFF! I just picked up this tooth that I am pretty sure is an Equus sp. found in phosphate deposits near Tampa Bay, FL. What drew me to it was two isolated cones that I haven't seen in the modern Equus teeth I've handled. Is this a positional morphology or one particular to a specific species? Thanks for your thoughts!
  11. Below are some online PDF files of the now defunct, but still famous, the Leisey Shell Pit in southwest florida. Leisey Shell Pit 1A, University of Florida Vertebrate Fossil Locality HI007 https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/florida-vertebrate-fossils/sites/leisey-shell-pit-1a/ https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/100years/leisey-shell-pit-fossils/ Hulbert, Jr., R.C., Morgan, G.S. and Webb S.D., eds., 1995. Paleontology and Geology of the Leisey Shell Pits, Early Pleistocene of Florida. Bulletin Florida Museum of Natural History, 37 (Part I). https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/bulletin/publications/ https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095791/00001 https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095791/00002/allvolumes Hulbert, Jr., R.C., Morgan, G.S. and Webb S.D., eds., 1995. Paleontology and Geology of the Leisey Shell Pits, Early Pleistocene of Florida. Bulletin Florida Museum of Natural History, 37 (Part II). https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/bulletin/publications/ https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095791/00002 https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095791/00002/allvolumes Hulbert, R.C. and Morgan, G., 1989. Stratigraphy, paleoecology, and vertebrate fauna of the Leisey Shell Pit Local Fauna, early Pleistocene (Irvingtonian) of southwestern Florida. Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313657536_Stratigraphy_paleoecology_and_vertebrate_fauna_of_the_Leisey_Shell_Pit_Local_Fauna_early_Pleistocene_Irvingtonian_of_southwestern_Florida http://floridapaleosociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Papers-in-Florida-Paleontology-2-July-1989.pdf Portell, R.W. and Kittle, B., 2010. Mollusca: Bermont Formation (middle Pleistocene). Florida Fossil Invertebrates, 13, pp.1-40. http://floridapaleosociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/FFI-13.pdf Kittle, B., and Portell, R.W., 2010. Mollusca: Fort Thompson Formation (middle Pleistocene). Florida Fossil Invertebrates, 13, pp.1-40. http://floridapaleosociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/FFI-12.pdf Morgan, G.S. and Hulbert Jr, R.C., 1995. Overview of the geology and vertebrate biochronology of the Leisey Shell Pit local fauna, Hillsborough County, Florida. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History, 37(1), pp.1-92. https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/files/7114/7180/9327/Vol-37-Part_1-No-1.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257620521_Overview_of_the_geology_and_vertebrate_biochronology_of_the_Leisey_Shell_Pit_Local_Fauna_Hillsborough_County_Florida https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Richard_Hulbert Taphonomy of the terrestrial mammals of Leisey Shell Pit 1A, Hillsborough County, Florida https://www.researchgate.net/publication/306429620_Taphonomy_of_the_terrestrial_mammals_of_Leisey_Shell_Pit_1A_Hillsborough_County_Florida https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Richard_Hulbert As lagniappe, there is also an online PDF of a guidebook to Cretaceous-Cenozoic Floras and Landscapes of Southeastern Australia. It is: First International Palaeontological Congress: Pre-Congress Fieldtrip 1: Cretaceous-Cenozoic Floras and Landscapes of Southeastern Australia https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233747871_Cretaceous-Cenozoic_Floras_and_Landscapes_of_Southeastern_Australia https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephen_Mcloughlin/2 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephen_Mcloughlin/ Yours, Paul H.
  12. Playa sinkhole opens up a large cave beneath highway Explorers find 2 1/2-million-year-old sea snail fossils https://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/playa-sinkhole-opens-up-a-large-cave-beneath-highway/ https://www.voanews.com/americas/mexican-highway-sinkhole-reveals-fossil-filled-cave Yours, Paul H.
  13. Southeast Texas Pleistocene Bones

    I've been searching the gravel bars in the Brazos almost every day this week while the water is still low enough to get down there, and I've collected a pretty good assortment of fossilized bones. Most of what I've found have been fragments that are totally unidentifiable, but a handful still have some significant features that could lead to an ID. There's too many pictures to post all at once, so I'll reply a couple times with more. Thanks for the help! This first find is definitely a tooth and is the only piece I have that isn't from the Brazos, instead I picked it up on a trip to one of the small beaches north of the Texas City dike. I'm thinking bison, but I'm open to suggestions.
  14. Hi all, this is my first time posting so please be gentle. I found this in my back yard and I am just looking for help with an ID. In Katy Texas, just west of Houston. It's small, less than 2" total but the fragment is around 1 inch. It's in a sandstone matrix (a couple of geologists told me it is "young" sandstone, whatever that means). I am new to Texas and not familiar with the history here. Based on Googling, it looks to me like maybe a Pleistocene-era alligator claw or possibly snapping turtle claw. It does not look like a tooth, alligator or otherwise. it has a groove running down the side (probably down both sides) and isn't really conical. the only ridge is on the outer/top part (the curved edge). Just curious about what it might be and hoping someone with more expertise can assist. Thanks in advance for any insights you may have!
  15. Ursus ingressus (Rabeder et al 2004)

    From the album Vertebrates (other than fish)

    Cave Bear fang tooth (carnassial) 11cm long. It's from the so-called "Drachenhoehle" in Mixnitz, Styria, Austria. Cave bear fossils from the Late Pleistocene have been found there for a long time and were generally identified as Ursus spelaeus, but it was first established through a detailed study in 2004 that all of these fossils actually belong to the smaller newly identified species U.ingressus. I snapped this one up recently on a good deal from our favorite auction site.
  16. Santa Fe tooth

    Hey guys, Around 2.5 years ago I found this tooth in the Santa Fe River in Florida, which is Pleistocene. I previously IDed it as a bison premolar (Bison antiquus), but looking back I am now less convinced by that ID. The chewing surface seems off, and seen from the top it seems a little too 'rectangular'. Due to its relatively small size, if it is indeed bison, could it possibly be a juvenile (hence explaining why it looks a bit different from normal bison teeth)? What do you guys think? I can provide more angles if necessary. Thanks in advance, Max
  17. Santa Fe carnivore canine

    Hey guys, Here's a partial canine that I got from Cris & Kyle around 2 and a half years ago. It's from the Santa Fe River in Florida, so Pleistocene in age. I've compared it to several canines online, and my best guess right now is spectacled bear (Tremarctos floridanus), but I feel like it could also be a lower canine from a dire wolf (Canis dirus). It doesn't seem cat-like to me. What do you think? I can provide more angles if necessary. Thanks in advance, Max
  18. Brazos River Mammoth Tooth Fragment?

    Another find today from the Brazos River just southwest of Houston. The grooves on top of this piece look very similar to pictures of mammoth teeth that I have seen before, but it is obviously far too small to be a full tooth or even half of one. Is it just a fragment? And is it even really a mammoth tooth? If it's a pseudofossil after all, it's a darn convincing one. It's definitely mineralized and has a crystal-like sheen with slight sparkles here and there when it catches the light. Any help on an ID would be great!
  19. Brazos River Bison/Horse Jaw

    Found these two teeth still attached to a segment of jawbone on the Brazos River just southwest of Houston today. They're definitely mineralized, so I believe I can rule out ordinary cows. However, after doing some research online the teeth seem to be much too flat to be bison, so maybe horse? They both look like molars, although one of the roots is broken off of the first tooth - I honestly have no idea how it managed to hang on for so long. Either way, I was incredibly excited to find this, especially after braving the 90 degree plus heat for several hours without sunscreen. Any help on an ID would be much appreciated. Thank you!
  20. Unknown fossil (tooth?)

    This is a post hurricane beach find. I picked up a number of mammal teeth, bone, scute, and stone artifacts on the trip. Assumed this was a tooth when I picked it up but unlike any I have ever seen before.
  21. Brazos River Pleistocene Find

    I was walking the Brazos River just southwest of Houston today since the water level is low enough to expose a good amount of gravel bars. Didn't find much until I finally found a spot to turn around and head back at when I spotted this bone poking out of the sand. I know that most of the Pleistocene age fossils in the Brazos aren't old enough to be mineralized, but this one definitely is - it's nice and solid. The part sticking out of the sand is white and the bottom is a little darker, kind of a brownish color. It might not be all that clear in the pictures, but there's a rounded groove on the "bottom" side that looks like it could have been the location of a ball and socket joint in the past. There's also some sand-like accretions on the edge of the bone containing some small pieces of gravel. I've always heard of people finding mammoth teeth and sloth bones on the river after hurricanes or big storms but have never had much luck myself. Thankfully it seems like that's changed! Any help on an ID would be much appreciated.
  22. Bone River Find Turtle?

    Another post regarding a specimen I found posted on a Facebook fossil ID page - which no one in the group can ID. This was found in a river in Iowa. Most of what is found in the area is Pleistocene to modern. My first though was part of a turtle shell attachment point? But I am stuck.
  23. Is this another denticle?

    I could use some help with the ID of this ornate little find from the Cookie Cutter matrix from Florida. I have considered ray tooth and shark or ray dermal denticles...@Al Dente @MarcoSr Thanks for looking.
  24. I am posting theses images pulled down off a Facebook fossil ID site because this has me STUMPED. It s a partial skull found in a Nebraska river. But of what?! Eyes and ears are high up and way back on the skull. I'll try to add more pics. Sorry stills from video are blurry. You can see what I believe is the ear canal close to the eye socket in the last photo.
  25. Hi all - in the hopes of attempting to reach a wider audience, and anyone who has collected possible sea otter fossils, I'm sharing the first two posts from my blog "The Coastal Paleontologist" in a short series on sea otter paleontology and evolution. The first one is mostly a bit on sea otter biology, and the second is the first one that really deals with the paleontology aspect. The third (and fourth?) posts will deal with what the limited fossil record can tell us about sea otter evolution. The sea otter fossil record is quite poor, and I'm hoping that some of you may have found some fossil specimens and might consider making them available for scientific study. Anyway, here's part 1: https://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2020/05/the-terrible-fossil-record-of-sea.html And part 2: http://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2020/06/the-terrible-fossil-record-of-sea.html Part 3: will update as soon as I get it finished! And a teaser - the left mandible of the holotype specimen of Enhydra macrodonta from the Crannell Junction locality right off of Highway 101 near Arcata, California. I spent about 3 years emailing various curators about this fossil, if they had it on loan, and I finally got a response from Dr. William Miller III at Humboldt State University in Arcata that he didn't remember such a specimen existing there. The paleontologist who named it, Dr. Frank Kilmer, who was retired, mailed me a letter indicating that the mandibles had been given back to the private collector (!!!) after the species was published - but nobody at HSU knew their name! One former student did, but would not return my phone calls. I visited HSU in 2008 when I was an undergraduate student and rifled through their teaching collection and found A mandible, but I didn't think it was THE mandible, because of Kilmer's letter, and a misplaced label suggesting it was from a different locality (and therefore a duplicate specimen rather than the original). Dr. Miller indicated I should arrange for the fossils to be transferred to a larger museum, as he was certain that the collection would be thrown in the garbage after he retired! I visited again two years later and set aside all the specimens that should be transferred and secured an agreement from HSU for the material to be transferred to UC Berkeley, which finally happened about five years later. I did not realize that this mandible was in fact THE mandible, or at least half of the holotype (the right mandible is still missing, presumably in that private collection) until I was able to download a much, much higher quality scan of the photographic plates in Kilmer's 1972 paper, and I was able to match barnacle scars between the published image and the fossil. So, we may not have the more complete of the two mandibles, but at least we have one of them, and it is my hope that there is more material in private collections and that more can be discovered in the future.
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