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Found 322 results

  1. Megalodon may have been killed off by Supernova radiation, Hannah Osborne, Newsweek, December 13, 2018 https://www.newsweek.com/megalodon-extinct-shark-supernova-cosmic-ray-cancer-mutations-1256980 Massive supernova explosion may have wiped out giant prehistoric sharks, scientists say. Megalodon may have been among creatures driven to extinction after cosmic particles drove up cancer rates, new study claims The Independent, Josh Gabbatiss, December 2018 https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/supernova-stars-explosion-giant-sharks-prehistoric-megalodon-extinction-science-a8679636.html The paper is: Adrian L. Melott, Franciole Marinho, and Laura Paulucci 2018, Hypothesis: Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the End-Pliocene Supernova. Astrobiology, Published Online, November 27, 2018 https://doi.org/10.1089/ast.2018.1902 and at Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the end-Pliocene Supernova Adrian L. Melott (Kansas), Franciole Marinho, Laura Paulucci (Submitted on 26 Dec 2017 (v1), last revised 17 Oct 2018 (this version, v2)) https://arxiv.org/pdf/1712.09367.pdf https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09367 Yours, Paul H.
  2. Happy holidays everyone. I would greatly appreciate help identifying the following specimen. It was collected in the Santa Susana Mountains of Simi Valley, Ventura County, California. It came from the Saugus or Pico Formation. Saugus is late Pleistocene to late Pliocene while Pico is middle Pleistocene to Pliocene. My uncertainty regarding the exact formation arises from the fact that (1) it was float material already weathered out of the formation it came from and (2) based on limited research and knowledge, I believe there has been a lack of consenus regarding differentiation of the two formations (see recent work by Richard Squires et al. in Valencia and R. Squires in Newhall). I assume it is marine since all of Pico is marine and Saugus is non-marine to marine. At first I thought it was a shark tooth when I picked it up but I threw that thought out the window when I realized it had three serrated edges. Measures 22 millimeters long and 6.5 millimeters wide. It is 4 millimeters tall on one end and 9.5 millimeters tall on he end that has the needle structure. There are three to four 'bumps' on both long sides on the end with the needle. The bumps look evenly spaced. I can and will do my best to provide additional info if needed.
  3. New papers recording new occurrences of fossil Monodontidae are available online: Hiroto Ichishima; Hitoshi Furusawa; Makino Tachibana; Masaichi Kimura (2018). First monodontid cetacean (Odontoceti, Delphinoidea) from the early Pliocene of the north‐western Pacific Ocean. Papers in Palaeontology. Online edition. doi:10.1002/spp2.1244. (describes Haborodelphis japonicus) Pesci et al. (2018). First record of Monodontidae (Cetacea, Odontoceti) in the Mediterranean Basin from the Pliocene sands of Arcille (Grosseto, Tuscany, Italy). Fossilia, Volume 2018: 37-39. Denebola and Bohaskaia were long the only described fossil monodontid species from the pre-Pleistocene, but Haborodelphis and the new monodontid skull from Tuscany shed new light on the distribution of monodontids.
  4. Shark Tooth Color

    Shark teeth that change color.. Here is one... a Mako. A Photo taken within 10 minutes of removing from a heavy blanket of mud, gravel, clay mixture. This tooth had not seen daylight in a couple of million years. Then a photo of the same tooth 2 hours later when I arrived home. Yes I applied water, then oil and neither the blade or especially the root darkens again.. If some type of organism that dies/fade in sun light, how about this hemi that came from the exact same location. Why is the root still black? Figure this will be a good discussion for shark experts.
  5. Myctophum sp.

    From the album Vertebrates

    Myctophum sp. Late Pliocene Vrica Italy
  6. Nov2018 Fossil Club Coral

    As the title says, I went to a local fossil club meeting last night. I always purchase tickets for the fossil lottery and selected these when my tickets were called early. Looking for an ID.... @MikeR What is the "frosting"..... Also kudos for a good presentation on Cretaceous Inland sea.. I learned from Joshua about identifying the shifting shoreline boundaries of the WIS by testing/core samples of current rocks, using the types of rock and imbedded fossils to identify the shoreline. There are always questions on TFF about finding fossils... Turns out Joshua has a really accurate map.
  7. Carmines Island/York River Va

    Hello all, I am going on a trip with the family down to Carmine's Island for recreation but figured while I'm there why not do some fossil hunting. I mean, it just makes the day better anytime. We know of a location called Felgates Creek, which is Pliocene. Good? Bad? Only about 29 minutes away from me. Can we just find stuff on the coastal beaches? Thanks
  8. This is interesting. Scientists Spot What May Be a Giant Impact Crater Hidden Under Greenland Ice By Meghan Bartels, Space.com, November 14, 2018 https://www.space.com/42431-giant-impact-crater-hidden-under-greenland-ice.html The open access paper is: Kurt H. Kjær, Nicolaj K. Larsen, Tobias Binder, and many others A large impact crater beneath Hiawatha Glacier in northwest Greenland. Science Advances 14 Nov 2018:Vol. 4, no. 11, eaar8173 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar8173 http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/11/eaar8173 Yours, Paul H.
  9. I don't read a lot about hominid fossils but I try to keep up with general knowledge of recent finds and discussions. Sometimes, the various science magazines will publish a special issue on the subject and I try to pick up a copy. The September issue of Natural History is devoted to human origins with a few articles with even one on the ancient primates of the Paleocene and Eocene along with a reprinted column by the late Stephen J. Gould. I haven't read it yet but leafed through it (nice artwork and fossil photos in it). I had seen it that month at a local Barnes & Noble but the last copy was all bent-up like an accordion. I looked for it at another store but couldn't find it. I went back to pick up the beat-up one I had seen but it was gone. After hunting around the magazine website, I found that back issues were available so I mailed away for it ($7 including shipping). Ten days later, it arrived. In case anyone else is interested, here's the link to page with the back issue address - just scroll down to it: http://www.naturalhistorymag.com/contact.html
  10. Florida Invertebrate trace?

    Hoping someone easily recognizes these and its an easy answer...my initial searches have been fruitless... So I was supposed to be looking for more Florida coprolites in the garage piles of fossils and got sidetracked looking as this large Turbinella columella and just noticed these tan circular markings on it and wanted to know if they were traces of serpulids? Probably Pliocene Tamiami formation, Sarasota County, Florida. Whats fascinating to me is their spiral?/concentric, ornamented/segmented? shape which appears to actually be etched into the gastropod shell itself. Almost look like cross sections of forams. I've scraped a number of the small white serpulid tubes off thinking I'd see a similar pattern but there is no marking beneath them--its perfectly smooth. If it is a tube, I wasnt aware that they could actually score the surface of the gastropod shell--seems pretty neat if thats what going on but maybe its something entirely different. The gastropod, aside from being badly damaged has sponge borings, barnacle and coral encrustration, and serpulid tubes. Most of the circular traces are around 1mm in diameter and a few push the 2 or 3mm size. Thanks for the help! Regards, Chris
  11. Help

  12. Chlamys decemnarius

    From the Pliocene Yorktown Formation Zone 2 Rushmere Member. An uncommon find at this particular site. Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, II MIOCENE AND PLIOCENE PECTINIDAE (BIVALVIA) FROM THE LEE CREEK MINE AND ADJACENT AREAS, by Thomas G. Gibson
  13. Pandora crassidens

    Complete double valves are rare at this site. Pieces of this shell are not uncommon. Found at the base of Zone 2, Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation on the Tar River. The two photos of the hinge detail were included to show that detail. They are not from the same specimen. PLIOCENE MOLLUSCS FROM THE YORKTOWN AND CHOWAN RIVER FORMATIONS IN VIRGINIA Lyle D. Campbell 1993
  14. Coprolites From Florida

    I was browsing the Forum and came across an excellent (Jan 25, 2018) post by @GeschWhat listing some characteristics of coprolites. Unhappily, Lori did not provide illustrations. I want to quote her list later. I have here a few coprolites from different rivers, including the Peace River. I'll post some images, and let you judge how well these specimens fit Lori's list of characteristics. This one (two images) is from the Peace River: This one (two images) is from the Suwannee River, a bear-dog site: This one (two images) is from the Peace River: This one (two images) is from the Peace River: Report post I don't subscribe to the 'lick test,' and Lori has heard all of the scatological jokes by now, so let's get down to serious 'business.' Feel free to provide further illustration or commentary on the identification of coprolites.
  15. Salvinia sp.

    From Wikipedia: " Small, floating aquatics with creeping stems, branched, bearing hairs on the leaf surface papillae but no true roots. Leaves are in trimerous whorls, with two leaves green, sessile or short-petioled, flat, entire and floating, and one leaf finely dissected, petiolate, rootlike and pendent. Submerged leaves bearing sori that are surrounded by basifixed membranous indusia (sporocarps). "
  16. Would anyone have a PDF of the following publication? Anatomy of a Regional Mass Extinction: Plio-Pleistocene Decimation of the Western Atlantic Bivalve Fauna Steven M. Stanley PALAIOS Vol. 1, No. 1 (Feb., 1986), pp. 17-36 Thanks in advance! Mike
  17. Onslow Beach find

    Good afternoon, I found this item during a during a pre Hurricane Florence visit to Onslow Beach. It seems to have some earmarks of a bone but the shape is very unusual. I am also leaning towards it being an interesting piece of nothing.Thank you in advance for any and all assistance.
  18. Hey all I was able to go out to Greenville, NC for a quick hunt this fine morning. Heres the haul Everything 2 exogyra and a oyster? That exogyra is absolutley MASSIVE some non-shark teeth Huge and reaaaallly old sperm whale tooth root. First whale tooth fish tilly bone Fish tooth. Could someone ID? Mosasaur tooth. My first mosasaur tooth too Belemnites Shark teeth Some good ones Great whites My first meg that still has serrations Nice big crow shark Two nice Hastilis tiger shark teeth are very rare in that layer Whale bone Ear bone Was a very good day, this was a result of only around 3 hours
  19. @Boesse While cleaning shells from the Pliocene deposits at Capitola I came across this dolphin tooth ~17 mm. Any ideas on a more specific identification? Thanks Mike
  20. Pusula crovoae

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Triviidae Pusula crovoae Olsson, 1967 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Ribs that end with nodes along the furrow.
  21. Pusula pediculus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Triviidae Pusula pediculus (Linnaeus, 1758) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Quality Aggregates, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Large for family. A common Caribbean species.
  22. Cleotrivia petrela

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Triviidae Cleotrivia petrela (Olsson & Harbinson, 1953) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: No furrow or just a trace of furrow with ribs that meet across furrow.
  23. Niveria suffusa

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Triviidae Niveria suffusa (Gray, 1827) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Smooth furrow along entire length of shell with finely beaded ribs.
  24. Hespererato maugeriae

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Eratoidae Hespererato maugeriae (Gray, 1832) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Often misidentified as a Marginella with which it resembles and was once classified as.
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