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Found 436 results

  1. Neohipparion eurystyle

    Mostly I hunt the Peace River, but sometimes I venture into the tributaries. About 3 weeks ago I hunted a creek and found this small lower premolar. Hoping it was not Equus ( no disrespect intended), I sent it to Richard Hulbert for identification. His answer: Identification of lower molars is difficult.. This horse has an isolated protocone on its upper molars making those easier to ID. I liked getting this identification because finding one of these can help to "date" a hunting location. Fast forward to yesterday, hunting a different tributary creek and Looks pretty similar to me.. Here are some sources to compare, 1st from Kansas, 2nd from Florida museum of Natural History. Thinking size as the 1st criteria because there are lots of variations in the lower jaw teeth of the SAME horse based on wear and position. Just documenting some new insights that I do not have on many of my other horse tooth finds. Enjoy. Jack
  2. Who’s bone is this?

    I stopped at Lake McConaughy (near Ogalalla, Nebraska) on my way out to Colorado and picked this (along with some nice burrow casts, probably clam) from one of the beaches. I’m not very familiar with the fossils in this part of the state and wondered if anyone could help me with who this chunk of bone may have belonged to. I know it’s a stretch to id this considering how little of the bone is there and the lack of either end, but any help would be appreciated.
  3. Pliocene river find

    When I picked up this bone and pieces my thought was bison. Reviewing it I’m not so sure, so will I defer to the experts! I was disappointed though to see this had been run over by an ATV on the sand bar... also sad to see really how polluted our water ways are...
  4. I’m excited about this find, not only is it a fossil, form what not totally sure, but I also believe it is a tool! You can see the marks from where it has been carefully cracked. On the flat side of the bone, you can see where it has been flattened as well. If not a tool then certainly harvested bone marrow. This was found in an area close to other Clovis finds.
  5. Pliocene bone river find in Iowa

    To me this seems to be a toe or foot bone of some sort but from what? Found in an area where bison, mammoth have been found. thanks for looking and any educated guesses!
  6. Sialis strausi ILLIES, 1967

    From the album Invertebrates

    Sialis strausi ILLIES, 1967 Alderfly larvae Late Pliocene Willershausen am Harz Lower Saxony Germany
  7. I had posted a poster of Florida shells of mine earlier but could not zoom in enough so I am posting individual fossil shells in hopes of getting correct identifications or adding to photo database. I am new to this so please gently guide me if I am not following a proper procedure or posting in an incorrect place. I have many high quality photos but am not sure where to put them. I can't seem to create a gallery for myself. Help Please? Thanks, Scott
  8. Newbie wanting to learn...

    I have a few pictures here of some shards of bone, horn, and or antler. Is there a way to tell the difference between them? The first two photos I believe to be horn, bison. Number three and four I also believe to be horn because of the wood grain pattern, but because it is a small fragment 1 1/2” I suppose it could be bone? photos 5&6 look to me like a rib bone, has a woody grain to it but is very solid, thick. However, I feel this could be horn or bone. How to tell the difference? The final two photos to me just looks like a shard of river polished bone, not horn. The wood grain is much less prominent than the others.
  9. Florida Fossil Shells

    I don't know where to begin. I am completely new to the forum. I will eventually be posting some fossils for help with ID and others that are identified by experts already. Having said that, this poster represents some of my fossils. I am not sure if can even read the names underneath. I may have to post separately. Any ID corrections would be graciously accepted. What I really need help with is locations. While living in FL for several years, I would go to a couple of locations in Polk Co. where I knew road base, I believe it is called aggregates were often kept. I visited and collected. What I don't know if where the shells originated. APAC Pit in Sarasota, Aggregates Pit in Bonita Springs, Star Ranch Quarry, Clewiston, Cochran Pit in Labelle to name a few possible locations. Based on the shells collected, it would seem that most come from either the Tiamiami or Caloosahatchee Formations, not sure which members....Pinecrest Beds, Bermont, Ayers Landing Ft. Denaud etc. How do I know what collection data to include on my label. I can list where I found it, but it is not its origin. ID is pretty ok with Petuch's works, but if I don't know the origin, it makes ID much more difficult. Any input or ideas to help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance. I have included a sample collection label for anyone to comment on how to improve. One is more vague since I don't know origin, the other is from a fossil I purchased. Date on label was date I added to my collection. How important is it to list the taxonomist such as Petuch or Conrad etc? scienceteacher79
  10. Populus willershausensis KNOBLOCH, 1998

    From the album Plants

    Populus willershausensis KNOBLOCH, 1998 Late Pliocene Willershausen am Harz Lower Saxony Germany
  11. Cross section of Clypeaster

    Found what appears to be a cross-section of a Clypeaster fossil in Pliocene sea deposits, on the Greek island of Kythera. The length is 16 cm. Any help and suggestions on the species would be much appreciated!
  12. PLIOCENE FOSSIL SHELL ID

    pliocene seashell from Cyprus
  13. Help to Id this Florida Find

    Not sure what this find is but possibly looks like a little skull of some kind??
  14. New find need help for IDing

    Not sure if it is turtle but it is approx 1 1/2 inch overall length
  15. Sciara strausi

    From the album Invertebrates

    Sciara strausi KOHRING & SCHLÜTER, 1993 dark-winged fungus gnats Late Pliocene Willershausen a. Harz Lower Saxony Germany Body length 4mm
  16. Chrysopilus sp.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Chrysopilus sp. Snipe fly belonging to the family Rhagionidae Late Pliocene Willershausen a. Harz Lower Saxony Germany wing length 5mm
  17. Conifer cone or catkin

    I found these lignified plant parts that sort of look like conifer cones from the Pliocene/Pleistocene Merced Formation along the Coast just south of San Francisco. Douglas Fir and Monterey Pine cones occur in the same formation. What are they? Could they be alder catkins? Top photo: cone is 1.5 cm high. Bottom photo: longest cone is 4 cm. Thanks, John @paleoflor
  18. Subpterynotus textilis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Subpterynotus textilis (Gabb, 1873) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: No modern descendant and therefore difficult to confuse with any other species found within the Tamiami Formation.
  19. Murexsul oxytata

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Murexsul oxytata (M. Smith, 1938) Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Boca Grande Quarry, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Distinctive outline makes it difficult to confuse with any other species.
  20. Favartia faceta

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Favartia faceta (E.H. Vokes, 1963) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Kissimmee River, Glades County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Short spire, inflated body whorl, long siphonal canal.
  21. Favartia shilohensis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Favartia shilohensis (Heiprin, 1888) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Higher spire and longer siphonal canal than F. cellulosa.
  22. Favarita petuchi

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Favartia petuchi (E.H. Vokes, 1994) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Simialr to outline as F. cellulosa but with sharp varices which flare upward on spire shoulders.
  23. Favartia cellulosa

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Favartia cellulosa (Conrad, 1846) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Quality Aggregates, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: In a comparison to other members of the genus, F. cellulosa is squat and rounded.
  24. Greetings fellow fossil enthusiasts! I don't know what this thing is. I've shown it to several other fossil guys in Houston and they don't know what it is either. I think it's from a fish of some sort, other than that I have no idea. I found it in Hogtown Creek in Gainesville so it's probably Late Miocene-Pliocene. Scale bar is in Millimeters. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  25. Encope tamiamiensis

    The sample image here was collected directly from a Drag Line operator's windrow in a lime rock mine in Southern FL just outside of Naples around the Sable Palm area of the Big Cypress swamp of the Everglades in 1997. The specimen has been completely removed from the limestone petrol (lime rock low density ls) matrix. What is interesting is the general shape of the specimen and how this 5 million year old specimen differs from the present day specimen at the same general location. I am guessing the seas of which the archaic specimens existed in were more challenging to exist in general as the specimen appears more elongate than present day specimen possibly for navigational purpose in higher energy seas than say today. Consequently the respiratory flower on top seems to be larger than today's comparable specimen as a direct consequence in the different morphology.
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