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Found 18 results

  1. Red Hill Matrix

    Hi everyone! I have what I was told is Red Hill matrix that has been sitting on my porch for a very long time now... Anyone familiar with this matrix that can help me out? I am wondering if it does in fact look like Red Hill and the best way to break the matrix down? Some are very large chunks that have too much quartz to dissolve I think but here are some of the smaller pieces. As you can see there's a lot of shells in there... lol Any feedback appreciated! Thanks in advance.
  2. Fossil sites around CT

    Hi everyone, I am new to this form and would like to know if there are any fossil sites in the general area around Connecticut. I myself live around Danbury CT and am not sure what places I could visit that are at most 4 hours of driving away from here. I have read about sites in PA like St.Clair and Carbondale but I believe both are closed now. Red Hill is also around that area but I don't know how I would get permission to go there. Also I don't really have a preference on type of fossil plants, fish, invertebrates, everything is welcome. Thank you
  3. Devonian fish scales

    With not a lot of new material to obsess with (broken arm) I have been going through old specimens to see if there are unfinished prepping and ID needed. Here is a set of scales/scale impressions collected in 2014 at Red Hill, late devonian (Famennian) site in Pennsylvania. Found in the shallow channel margin (red sediments) with what has been ID'd as a couple scapulocoracoids of the acanthodian, Gyracanthus (plus a fin spine). They are almost certainly sarcopterygian but not sure what clade. Has anyone, Archie? seen similar scales. Thought they might be Holoptychius but they don't look like the classic Holoptychius scales and they were not at all common in this upriver environment. Doug Rowe who oversees the site and runs the outstanding museum there, suggested they might be Rhizodont but nothing I've seen of Rhizodont scales looks anything like these. Thanks for any help.
  4. 25 Years of Fossil Collecting Yields Clearest Picture of Extinct 12-Foot Aquatic Predator, Drexel University, May 8, 2018 https://www.delval.edu/news/25-years-of-fossil-collecting-yields-clearest-picture-yet-of-extinct-12-foot-aquatic-predator https://www.rdmag.com/news/2018/05/25-years-fossil-collecting-yields-clearest-pictureextinct-12-foot-aquatic-predator https://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2018/05/25-years-fossil-collecting-yields-clearest-picture-yet-extinct-12-foot-aquatic-predator The paper is: Daeschler, E.B. and Downs, J.P., 2018. New description and diagnosis of Hyneria lindae (Sarcopterygii, Tristichopteridae) from the Upper Devonian Catskill Formation in Pennsylvania, USA. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, p. e1448834. The abstract of this page can be found at; https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2018.1448834 A related paper is: Cressler, W.L., Daeschler, E.B., Slingerland, R. and Peterson, D.A., 2010. Terrestrialization in the Late Devonian: a palaeoecological overview of the Red Hill site, Pennsylvania, USA. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 339(1), pp. 111-128. https://digitalcommons.wcupa.edu/geol_facpub/8/ https://digitalcommons.wcupa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C19&q=Hyneria+lindae+devonian&btnG=&httpsredir=1&article=1008&context=geol_facpub Yours, Paul H.
  5. What Glue to Use for Red Hill, PA

    Hey everyone! For my April Vacation I'm going fossil hunting in NJ and PA. The plan is to visit the Cretaceous brooks in Monmouth County, then a fern site in the east of PA and later make my way to Red Hill near Hyner. I have seen on multiple posts from the forum along with other websites that bringing plenty of glue is essential for the preservation of the fragile Devonian fossils. Can someone please lend some insight as to how I could either purchase or make the right kind of adhesive for this job? Thank you.
  6. This last Saturday was a repeat of the previous collecting day I had on Oct. 8 at Red Hill, PA. Once again a tailgate of specimens was found. The most of my digging is in the Green Shale layer. That is where I find the most plants. For the most part, the fossils were all Archaeopteris with one nice macilenta species. A species I don't find much of. The last close up pic is a textbook example of spore cases found on fertile branches of Archaeopteris.
  7. Some of us fossil collectors believe there is no such thing as a bad day fossil collecting. Well, yesterday at Red Hill, PA it was muddy, rainy and cold. I'll will have to admit it was still a good day fossil collecting. One of my objectives to collecting at this Upper Devonian site is to find fossil plants, namely Archaeopteris. Well it happened big time. A picture of my truck tailgate tells the whole story of my catch of the day. What was found were 3 species of Archaeopteris, fertile and infertile leaves, large plates and small pieces that I liked too much to discard.
  8. HyneriaJaw2016medial.JPG

    From the album Catskill Formation

    This Jaw was found and extracted from the wall at Red Hill in North Bend, PA by my son Ian (DevonIan Fish). It is similar in size to the jaws he discovered in 2014 which are now in the collections Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia and will be used to re-describe Hyneria.
  9. I'm so excited about going to the Red Hill Fossil site in PA with DVPS club and would like some or any advice on collecting there. This is my first time at Red Hill and I did find somethings about the site online but nothing about on how to collect ,,where to look or what to bring with me. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I will post pictures of my finds .. .... if any. Thank You
  10. Plant ?

    One of my treasures from Hyner, PA.
  11. U.Devonian Plants

    A plate of stems and branches from the "Red Hill" U.Devonian site near Hyner, Pennsylvania. Catskill formation I believe.
  12. This summer I went on a trip to Red Hill, the famous freshwater vertebrate locality in Pennsylvania. The fossils found at the site are from the Duncannon Member of the Catskill formation, which is Famennian stage Devonian in age. I was lucky enough to find an area they had recently used a jackhammer to expose new fossils, in which I found loads of great fossils. I ended up with a lot of unidentified fossils, so I need some help with these. I think this is a fish bone: I'm pretty sure this is a megalichthyidid scale. I like how it is colored! Fish chunks. I don't know if these would be identifiable, but I would at least like to know what sort of fish they're from. Placoderm, maybe?
  13. Prepping Fossils From Red Hill, Pa

    This summer, I was fortunate enough to get to go to the famous Red Hill site in Pennsylvania. I found lots of awesome fossils, including teeth, scales, and bones. I was lucky enough to find a spot they had recently used a jackhammer to expose new fossils. In the piles they had broken out of the hillside, I found nice unweathered bones and a few small spines. I would like to prep the spines out of the rock, but the rock from Red Hill is hard and does not break down easily. One of the spines: The back of the rock has lots of bone chunks and stuff:
  14. Red Hill And St. Clair Fossil Sites?

    Later this month I am going to Pennsylvania and heard about the Red hill Fossil site but i wanted to know how to get permission and where exactly it is. I am staying near hershey PA but i will be willing to drive a few hours to get to the site. I also wanted to know if you can hunt at st. clair still and where that is too. Thanks in advance.
  15. Red Hill Fragment - Fish Part Or Shell?

    1. Any ideas what this Red Hill fragment might be? I just discovered this in the red shale from our Red Hill trip in June. This is an odd but well defined fragment from the 361 million year old Devonian site where tetrapods crawled onto land - not sure if this is shell material or part of a Devonian fish - about 1 cm - any ideas? 2. Is this a trilobite or shell? (Devonian/Mahantango/Juniata County PA) - about 5cm long: 3. I previously posted this but since found this oblong shell in a reference book - believe it is the bivalve Nuculites - I identified this bivalve after posting - this oblong shell is about 2 cm and retains some of its striking iridescence - from Tully NY (windom/moscow formation):
  16. From the album Red Hill Devonian Teeth, Scales, Dorsal Spines

    © Copyright (c) 2012 by Michael Tomczyk. Artist illustrations from the Devonian Times website.

  17. Devonian Red Hill Tiny Fish Fossils

    This image on the right shows a tiny Devonian fish spine from our June trip to Red Hill, PA - any help identifying this would be much appreciated. The long vertical fossil immediately to the right looks like the fossil of a minnow sized Devonian fish but [Herb] suggests it is actually a plant - archaeopteris - he has a keen eye! It is possible to peel back more rock covering the stem to verify but we're new to fossiling and this might be a bit tricky for us to attempt. More photos from our Red Hill trip are included in the Members Gallery including Hynaria and Placoderm teeth, scales, and other fossils. The contrast of the green and red shale is striking. The greenish grey shale is pond or lake mud that dried up approximately 361 million years ago and the red is mostly fossilized soil. More of our Red Hill fossils are included in a posting in the Members Gallery.
  18. We collected these fossils at the classic Devonian site at Red Hill in PA (where some of the first early tetrapods that crawled onto land were discovered). Shown are a Placoderm tooth, a very clear Hynaria tooth impression, Hynaria dorsal spines, Placoderm scale (note the texture on the scale) and a fragment that we aren't sure if it's skin or bone. Note the tiny white dorsal fine/spine from a Devonian fish. Most intriguing to us is the vertical fossil next to the white dorsal spine which looks like a full fossil of a minnow sized fish - I added a separate horizontal image of this and the horizontal has a piece removed to reveal a "lobe" at the left side. Since posting this it has been suggested that the long fossil is actually a plant - archaeopteris - and what we thought was a "tail" is actually a leaf. However, the white bony dorsal/spine fossil still appears to be a Devonian fish. This was our first fossil hunting trip but although we are new to the field, we are enthusiastic about our new avocation. Doug Rowe who co-discovered and manages the Red Hill site, was extremely patient and helpful. Cathy Young and Karenne Snow led the trip, which took us to half a dozen Devonian and Ordovician sites and introduced us to a wide variety of fossil rich terrains.
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