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Found 623 results

  1. My son and I have have been finding a few sharks teeth in Galveston that have washed onto the beaches. Does anyone know the age or the formation that these teeth are washing up from?
  2. Hey all, Made it to Big Brook Preserve today with my daughter. Water level was a little higher than last visit and water starting to get cold. We found some decent teeth. Nothing large which is typical for this area but some nice specimens with great coloring along with partials. Toss in a few Belemnites and it was a good last trip to Big Brook for the year.
  3. My Aurora Pile

    Hey everyone! About 2 weeks ago, the VERY generous @AshHendrick gave a portion of his Aurora pile, straight from the mine! I put it around a wood frame in my yard, and have hunted it for hours almost every day. This will be an ongoing thread, I will prob not update every day, but at least weekly. This is the pile. It's bigger than it looks in this pic (about 5.5 x 5.5 feet [a little less than 2 meters i think]) What I do is I sift into the bucket, so I don't go through it twice. I dump it somewhere else. Day 1 Coral Fish vert I think this is coprolite, but I'm not sure Turtle shell Cool rock with turritella another turritella Big steinkern Sorry about the blurry pic, the only one I took of the ray teeth The shark teeth Find of the day shark tooth in matrix the shells. Appreciate ID's That's day 1. more coming
  4. I apologize in advance for the terrible photos however my nepgew is driving me crazy to post this item he found today. We are digging in Venice and caspersen beach. Any clue what this tiny little beadish item could be? Thanks!
  5. Last week I flew out to Baltimore for a conference for my work. The conference ended Friday morning. I had arranged to stay through Sunday in Maryland to go fossil hunting. Friday afternoon I caught an Uber to a car rental place and then drove the rental car down to Brownie's beach on Chesapeake Bay. It was about a 90 minute drive. The drive was beautiful once I got past Annapolis. It was lush and green with many farms and homes on large pieces of land. It started sprinkling just after I got on highway 2. I made it to the area now named Bayfront Park. The park seemed to consist of maybe 20 parking spots max with a trail of maybe 0.1 miles down to the beach. Along the path were small signs on stakes identifying some of the local trees. There were no facilities present. I parked my car. It was still sprinkling. I changed my shoes, put on ball cap and sweater to provide some protection from the rain. I was wearing capris so that I could walk in the water a bit. The temperatures had been in the 80s most of the time I had been in Maryland, but that day it was in the mid 60s. I arrived around 2:30 PM. Low tide was not till 6:40. I didn't know what to expect. I was told to turn right to head to the cliffs. So I did. The beach consisted of maybe 20 feet of sand between the woods and the water. There may have been 800 meters of beach between the entry point and where the shore made a sharp 90 degree turn east, making an L shape where a small cove was. The bank ran maybe 50 feet east before making a 90 degree turn going south again. The beach was littered with dead horseshoe crabs big and small. There were not any shells or anything much else on the beach. There were quite a few shell fragments of fossilized shells. Some had pretty patterns on them. There was a family with 4-5 young children on the beach. The dad was hunting for shark teeth with a screen and colander. Other than the family there was no one else on the beach, but there were 3 cars in the parking lot when I arrived. So, at least 2 other people had to be somewhere along the beach. About 20 minutes after I made it to the beach a local man came down onto the beach for a walk. He stopped to talk to me and asked what I was doing. He said he had hunted shark teeth there for years, but had quit hunting and just came down to walk the beach for the enjoyment of it. Oops sorry folks my computer is a laptop and a bit glitchy and somehow it posted this before I was done. I am still working on it. I'll get there eventually. Piece by piece.
  6. Hello everyone, Last Saturday, October 6th, I joint a fossil hunting excursion of the Dutch geological society (NGV) to the ENCI quarry, near the town of Maastricht (The Netherlands). This quarry has been in production since 1926, and has been one of the best fossil hunting sites of the Netherlands ever since. Worldwide, the youngest time interval of the Cretaceous Period is known as the Maastrichtian, a reference to the rock layers exposed in this area. We owe this international reference to the instrumental work of Belgian geologist André Hubert Dumont, who, in 1849, first described the rock layers in the valley of the Meuse River, close to the present-day ENCI quarry. Consequently, the rock sequence in the ENCI quarry constitutes the original type-locality of the Maastrichtian Stage. The Maastrichtian rocks are also world famous for their excavated mosasaur skeletons (the word 'mosa' is latin for the river Meuse. Mosasaurs are also named after this locality). Yet, unfortunately, all good things come to an end: the ENCI quarry is closing down. The production has stopped this month, and the quarry is now turned into a nature conservation area. Most of the quarry walls are currently being covered up, to make 'nice' gently slopes. Burying all remaining fossils forever.... So the remaining few excursions this year are the very last opportunity to hunt some fossils in this once glorious pit. I have been there a couple of times this year, and every trip fills me with melancholy. While the hunting is still relatively okay(ish), the possibilities become fewer and fewer, and only a very small part of the total strata can be examined....
  7. Hey folks! @Cris and myself grabbed the canoe recently and set out on yet another exciting fossil hunting voyage! We went to a slightly flooded, very remote creek in the middle of the swamp. Confidence in finding tons of fossils were not high, but to our surprise we were rewarded with literally hundreds of sharks teeth! Nothing of major size, but the sheer number of fossils was just as exciting for us. Can't wait to go back! We were also able to collect some micro matrix which is loaded with tiny shark teeth and other fossils. I'll definitely be posting stuff from that when I look through what I collected!
  8. Well, it's been a while since I've been out and about growing my collection of long-since-perished critters, so needless to say, I've been restless. I've been somewhat late in putting up my trip report, as this was doubling as a school project (writing a news feature on PAG (Paleontology Association of GA) for the school news site, 3ten) and everything at the place was taken on an NVidia whereas usually my smartphone does the trick. Anyway, enough BORING excuse backstories! Let's get to the meat of it! This past week was rather hectic for me. A trip to Pensacola where I swam in September ocean thinking it was July, a wisdom tooth surgery happened and the Braves got that sweet, succulent NL East crown, punching their ticket into October ball. Adding this trip on top of that made my fall break jam packed. I'd been waiting for an eternity to go to Sandersville with PAG ever since I heard of the announcement on their page way back in August. As soon as I was greenlit by my the editors of the school news to cover the event for school news, I was going, half dead from wisdom teeth or not. It turns out I wasn't as energy-sapped as I thought I'd be, as my wisdom tooth recovery had been pretty speedy (thank the Lord). Everyone going met in a Walmart parking lot more minutes away. We got told of the treasures we'd find (though I already knew): Periarchus sand dollars (heck yeah!) Crassostrea Gigantissima oysters (yes pls!) And shark teeth/Ray plates (good for me!) After that and a brief discussion on directions and my covering the trip for the school news, we headed off about a minute or so down the road to the landowner's property. We pulled in on a dirt road, and parked in an area of tall grass. The actual site itself was a short trek through the woods to get to the small creek where the Sandersville Limestone was actually exposed. It was somewhat difficult to get the camera equipment down to the creek along with the gear which I was actually using to get stuff out of the matrix, but it wasn't unmanageable and was definitely worth it. Here's what the much of the creek looked like: After getting together all of my pictures for the news, I went ahead and got to the fun part: finding stuff! My first and primary objective was the Periarchus quinquefarius kewi sand dollars, as with my trip to Montgomery in July, I have officially caught the echie bug. It didn't take very long to start finding them protruding from the limestone: After taking four with me, I moved to my next target: the Crassostrea Gigantissima oysters. These hold a special place in my heart, as my uncle Frank and I went driving near Griffins Landing trying to find an access point to get some of these huge oysters to no avail. Also, I heard that these oysters can only be found in Georgia (though i'm not sure about how true that statement is. Any answers regarding this?). To find them, I went a way downstream to where this Oyster exposure is: I was already getting packed with inverts, and I had a lot of stuff to carry back to the car, so I only took the most complete one I saw. Last but not least, I made a pitstop at where most of the group was sifting at a particularly deep and clay-ey part of the creek for shark's teeth and decided to indulge myself in a handful. Here are some of the other guys getting sift-fulls: Next post: My finds of the trip
  9. We did some research a while back and hit a spot a couple days ago for the first time since hurricane Irma came through. It's a place that doesn't look like it should have fossils at all when you're looking at it, but there's a ton of shark teeth in the gravel on the bottom (if you can find it). This is one of those untouched remote spots that people have no idea there's fossils to be found in, even if they happened to be fishing or paddling past the area. We didn't find anything huge, but the quantity was certainly there...Some screens had 20+ shark teeth, many of them being okay sized lemon shark teeth, Hemipristis, etc. We also got a couple pieces of megalodon....Lots of potential here. I don't think I included much of it in the vid, but I also did some microfossil matrix processing and I'm planning to do a lot more of that here. Unfortunately the quality of some of the clips shot with the GoPro are pretty low...No idea what happened there.
  10. Can anyone help me with the water levels at Greens mill run? Going to make a trip there in the next couple days and I want to make sure it’s not super high.. anyone in the area seen if the 10th street bridge is high or the park?! Please and thank you!!
  11. This Summer’s Finds

    Hello all! While these are all only pieces of teeth, I have found two species I never have before. I found an angustidens as well as a small GW fragment. If any of my ID guesses are wrong, feel free to point them out. Thanks for looking. Also, notice the serrations in the close ups of the GW fragment and how they differ from the close ups of a baby meg.
  12. Shark Teeth?

    Hey guys... First post here. I live around the Victoria area here in Ellis County. I've always been interested in our local history, but my interests have recently shifted to a little 'older' part of our history around here, more specifically when we were covered by warm-water oceans. I've spent a good portion of this summer walking creeks searching for SOMETHING, ANYTHING, and have came up empty handed. It's my understanding that the Sharks teeth and vertebrae will mostly be located in a specific sediment layer, and apparently I'm missing that. Can anybody help me out with identifying good places to search for these 'common' fossils that seem to be eluding me? Any help is greatly appreciated!!
  13. This coming up weekend?! Sept. 20-22.

    Hello everyone! I was originally going to go to the Mine in Maysville NC this weekend and look for Teeth but I’m pretty sure they will call it off due to the bad weather they had. I also thought about going to GMR but they flood very easy and I don’t know if the water will be down by Thur. Or Friday. Can anyone help me with any spots that might be good within a 3 hour drive of Virginia Beach. Or if anyone reading this lives near Greenville and have any news on the water levels at the park or the bridge could you please let me know?! Thanks in advance! -Holly
  14. Hi guys, last week I was on holiday in Austria and had the chance to hunt at the area of Adnet. There you can find fossils in the red "Adneter Schichten" which are lower jurassic deposits. I was there twice for about 4 hours at all and I found some cool stuff! At my first visit I found plenty of ammonites, one nautilus and some bivalves. It was a very rainy day. Here is a picture of the site: And this is the only ammonite I could prepped until now: Its a 5 cm long Phylloceras. A kinda common species there. The prep work is really difficult, because there is no really separation layer between stone and fossil. I didnt prepped the nautilus until now so I can you show a picture of the unprepped example: On my second visit the weather was very good (maybe even too hot ). Because of that and because of the enormous luck I had I found some shark teeth I didnt really expect to find one although I had already saw some teeth from there on the internet. But I didnt found one I found many Here are the 4 nicest ones until now: The first one is very fragile and 1 cm long: The second shark tooth is about 2 cm long and I like the combination with a crinoid stem: Then this one is about 1.2 cm long and seems to be only a fragment. But I still like it And last but not least the find of the day: A 2.6 cm long shark tooth!! I will try to take better pictures of last and biggest shark tooth after cutting the stone a bit smaller. At the moment the tooth is on a huge stone! The prep work on the shark teeth was also very hard because the teeth are very fragile and the stone is very hard. I prepped it with different needles and with my air scribe I am very pleased with those finds I assume that all shark teeth are Sphenodus shark teeth. Thanks for watching! Hope you enjoyed
  15. @Cris and I went to a brand new, unexplored site for us the other day, and it was definitely promising! We grabbed the canoe and went in a small, swampy creek. After lifting the canoe over what seemed like hundreds of log jams, we finally ended up finding some gravel! Sure enough, the gravel contained some fossils and we freaked out! Nothing insane was found this time, but we believe there is some amazing potential. We'll be heading back to this site for more exploration very soon!
  16. Cretaceous Shark Teeth ID

    Would anyone possibly be able to help me identify the types of shark teeth in this picture? They are from Post Oak Creek in Sherman, TX. Thank you!
  17. Creekin' for Shark Teeth!

    @Cris and myself went on another brutally hot fossil hunt to the creek yesterday. We went for just a few hours, and were very pleased with the results! We found a couple roughed up Megalodon teeth, some very nice Mako's, a big crocodile tooth, and my favorite find of the day was a killer three-toed horse tooth! I'm gonna go rest my back now
  18. GMR Tomorrow?

    On my way back home to New Jersey from our road trip, I’m stopping in Greenville tonight. I am going to collect for a few hours tomorrow morning and drive the rest of the way home. Is anyone up for a few hours?
  19. Isurus Desori?

    Hey everyone! I’m just looking for a confirmation seeing as i’m not very experienced. I found this in Summerville, SC, sticking out of the chandler bridge formation (late oligocene). I believe it is a tooth from the extinct mako, desori? Sorry, I don’t have anything to scale it with but it is about 1.75 inches long.
  20. Headed To Big Brook

    Headed out to Big Brook tomorrow. We have a few hot spots for belemnites and oysters but not so for shark teeth. When we explore this area we always head downstream of the bridge. Is it worth exploring upstream of the bridge? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  21. Hello! This is my first time posting on the forum. My family and I got into fossil hunting about a year ago. My two sons (ages five and seven) love dinosaurs just like many kids their age, so while on vacation in Florida, we made a day trip to Venice Beach to look for shark teeth. We didn't even have sifters, but we found a handful of shark teeth and were hooked! We've enjoyed making day trips to Aurora Fossil Museum in NC to "dig the past." We decided to change things up a little and explore Green Mill Run in NC. We live in Chesapeake, VA (near Virginia Beach), so Greenville is about two hours and twenty minutes away. Aurora is about two hours and forty minutes away. We brought a large shovel and a few screens. I have a couple of small hand sifters (intended for baking) that the boys can get a good handle on. We had a medium screen that we bought in Aurora and we zip-tied a pool noodle around it so it would float. This past April, we went fossil hunting in the Peace River in Florida, so hunting at Green Mill Run was similar. The water level was pretty low (a foot high or less) and there was plenty of shade so the boys could take a break from the sun. At first, I tried digging around a rock to see if any teeth were caught up in there. I would get about an average of three teeth per shovelful. It was great to be finding so many teeth like in Aurora while also keeping cool in the water! After about an hour, I decided to try moving around to different spots where I saw lots of rocks instead of sticking one place. This approach yielded even more teeth. We walked away with lots of shark teeth, squid pens (they're called pens, right?), and other fragments that seemed significant. We hunted for about two hours until the boys were ready to go and a bit hangry (I did pack a lunch...). I could have stayed all day, but they were a bit tired after the long car ride--and we still had to go back in the car to get home. It was a great first trip there and I'd love to go back! My husband was a bit worried about the possibility of snakes, but we didn't see any at all. I would definitely recommend water shoes because there was A LOT of glass in the sand. My seven-year-old son makes videos of our fossil hunting trips for his YouTube channel, which he calls Dino Study. If you want, you can watch it below. My five-year-old son doesn't like making as much of an appearance on camera, so there is a little less footage of him. The best finds included a nice, large sand tiger tooth (found by my seven-year-old) and a large great white tooth (I believe) that I found from the surface. Most of the teeth from the day. I saw this and thought it could be a molar of some kind or perhaps just a conveniently-shaped rock. I have a photo of the top and bottom.
  22. Is this a baby meg tooth?

    I found this tooth at point a dam, is it a baby meg? I really can’t tell..
  23. First stop on our road trip was at brownies beach Thursday. My boys, our dog, and myself had a great time! Weather was fantastic. We walked around the bend, spent about 3 hours total. Saw lots of blueclaw crabs, some fish, and the boys had a bald eagle fly about 10 feet over their heads. And we found some teeth! A few makos, couple of hemis, some tigers, lemons... on the way out my son asked me to help him clear sand out of his water shoes and I found a nice fish vert in 4 inches of water just a few feet before I got to him. I thanked him for deciding to clear his shoes out at that spot. We also kept a few shells that were in good condition and will make a nice display. We stopped at gmr on friday, will post our results soon. Currently we are in the Charleston area and my boys REALLY want to find a meg. I do not know my way around here, but we will try to explore a creek or two in the Summerville area, have to look on google maps.
  24. Hey everyone, I'm looking for a Cardabiodon tooth (or possibly a Dwardius) If you have one, please message me and we can make a trade! Will trade other species of shark teeth (I have a lot of different options), so PM me if you are looking for a specific species to trade!
  25. Shark Teeth Identification 2

    I have several shark teeth from Post Oak Creek in Grayson County, Texas and I was hoping to get help with identification. The period is Cretaceous. Thank you in advance for any help.
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