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Found 262 results

  1. Is this a fossil?

    I don't know if this is mineral or fossil.
  2. Tiny corals?

    Are these two samples corals? The first is 0.5 cm; the second is part of a 2 cm "stalk."
  3. No idea what this is

    I opened a rock today and found a sample that I believe to be the same as another which I haven't been able to identify. I would love to know what it is I am looking at. Thx!
  4. "fat" coral

    I have a lot of coral but none like this one. I don't know whether it's size is the result of the fossil process or coral type. It's 3.5 cm tall; circumference is 12.5 cm.
  5. Are these sponges?

    I am not always able to understand when I am looking at a sponge. Thx in advance.
  6. Is this an echinoderm?

    Is this an echinoderm?
  7. Is this a trilobite?

    I am wondering if this sample is a trilobite. The second pic contains an additional sample. Both taken from the same rock.
  8. crinoid or other echinoderm pattern?

    I was wondering about this pattern. Thx.
  9. Plant fossil?

    I was wondering if this might be a plant fossil, or is it an imposter? Found in Kosciusko County, Indiana. Silurian? Devonian?
  10. I visited a small Paleozoic (Silurian) coral reef in Indiana the other day. No earth-shattering, jaw-dropping discoveries, but it's an interesting spot with dolomitized fossils. Here's a google earth view of the center of the reef. A nice mollusk, if anyone knows what species, let me know. It shattered when I tried to extract it, but I was able to glue it back together as you can see here. Sphaerexochus romingeri cephalon After extraction.. I believe this is a Platyceras: To be continued..
  11. Is this coral?

    This is a macro shot of a samples measuring btn 1/8"-1/4". I was wondering if it's coral.
  12. From the creek

    I pulled this from the creek and wanted to know if it has enough information to posit an ID.
  13. Help IDing fossils

    I am looking for help in making accurate IDs of some fossils from northcentral Indiana, wondering if they are bryozoans. All are approx 1/4"-1/2".
  14. Crinoid

    From an outcropping of The Forks formation (Maine), a Silurian aged turbidite. I'm thinking the base of a calyx. The top of the photo is being rotated toward the camera.
  15. Silurian - crinoid vertebra?

    Central PA, Mifflintown-Bloomsburg (undividied) Block collected from roadsite float. Its pretty variable, with a flaky/fissile layers alternating with slightly more cohesive ones. Lots of broken brachiopod bits. For an experiment to I dropped an unremarkable flake the size of a large coin in some vinegar and let it soak for a day. The flake had a couple brachiopod bits and I wanted to see if they would fall free or dissolve in place. The brachiopds disappeared and I was left with this (see pics). Of course I got really excited and thought I had an early fish spine, but now I think I dissolved a crinoid stem and what we see is the matrix that filled in the soft bits. What do you think? Total length is 3/4"
  16. Hi all, first post here. Central PA, Slab from roadside float from Mifflintown-Bloomsburg (undivided). A thin layer contains a lot of small (1/16" dia), flattish fossils that I think might be inarticulate brachiopods. I have a number of specimens from other parts of the exposed layers and these do not appear in any of the others. One old paper on this formation mentioned "inarticulate brachiopods". I'm new enough that I didn't know about the articulate and inarticulate division in this group, so I'm already learning stuff. Awesome. Googling some pics returned some images that kinda look like what I have. But not quite. What do you think? If not inarticulate braichiopod, what else could they be?
  17. Shrine of the Japanese trilobites

    Stocker, C., Williams, M., Oji, T., Tanaka, G., Komatsu, T. and Wallis, S., 2019. Spirits of Yokokurayama: shrine of the Japanese trilobites. Geology Today, 35(1), pp.15-19. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gto.12255 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330640693_Spirits_of_Yokokurayama_shrine_of_the_Japanese_trilobites Yours, Paul H.
  18. Fossils on Wheels received another generous donation to our education programs this week. TFF member @Herb sent us a box of super cool invertebrates. He sent us a diversity of fossils from the Southern US that cover a wide range of eras. These fossils will be given to students in fossil starter kits and used in hands-on activities. Herb's donation is also awesome because this pushes me to learning a lot more about invertebrate fossils. One of the best parts of teaching kids about natural history through fossil exploration is that I get to learn a lot. Good teachers learn and challenge themselves so they can challenge their students. I do not have a lot of knowledge about these types of animals but I am so excited to start learning. Among the fossils we received were- Mississippian Corals and Brachiopods from Kentucky, Crinoid stems and Silurian sponges from Tennessee, Cretaceous Gastropods from Texas, and Eocene Bivalves from Alabama. Thank you Herb for a generous donation that will get put to good use
  19. Diving Into Georgia's Silurian Seas

    Much of this past week has felt less like a winter break and more like a switch from school work to government work. It seemed like many a day this week slowly chugged along, clogged by bureaucratic paperwork, followed by some bureaucratic paperwork, topped off with...more bureaucratic paperwork. As I'm sure many of you can understand, this left me a little restless. Having only the internet to provide you much of any entertainment will only last you so long. Thus, I decided today would need some much-needed paleo zest. A couple of days back I was scanning through Fossil hunting videos on YouTube, looking for new things to do (or watching the Ditch Weasel's Megalodon tooth hunting videos for the billionth time). Then I came across a video I hadn't watched in a long time, about a mysterious GA site I had never been to before. With a quick look in the description and comment section, I learned that it was near Dalton. With this in mind, I Googled "Dalton Fossils". To my surprise, the first result was a trip report @Nimravis wrote a little more than a year ago: With GPS coordinates now saved to Google Maps, My step grandpa and I headed out, partly guided by my phone's robotic voice. We arrived at the site, greeted by a thick fog: I put on waterproof boots, grabbed my hammer and chisel, and crossed the street to begin my search for Silurian treasures from the Red Mountain Formation. When we crossed the street, going around the leftmost portion of the wall (parking lot perspective), We heard a rustling off to the right. A decent sized Boulder slid down from the top of the hill, taking a decent chunk of dirt with it. In the end, it was a relatively small event, but we kept an eye out in case of other potential instabilities in the rock face. At entrance, facing the direction the mine lankslide occured Full attention on finding fossils, it didn't take very long at all to find some brachiopod plates.
  20. Ostracod or something else?

    Hi, I have another mysterious fossil. Silurian. Ostracod? Any ideas? (Bottom right): Side View:
  21. HI, Curious what this could be? It measures only 1mm found in Silurian deposit northern Illinois embedded in matrix along with pelecypods and gastropods. It looks like it could possibly be a tiny shark tooth, but I don't know anything about shark teeth. Are teeth ever found that small? At first thought maybe conodont but doesn't really have the caramel sheen to it. Any ideas? Any help appreciated.
  22. Othoceras Sp - Noth West of France.

    From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    Othoceras Sp from North West of France (silurian)
  23. Didymograptidae indet plate

    From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    A graptolithes (Didymograptidae indet) plate from north west of France - Silurian.
  24. Sam Lawrence Park, Hamilton, Ontario

    I was looking back at my pictures I took in the summer and I realized I forgot to share pics of a park I discovered up on Hamilton’s Mountain with nice exposures of rock formations of the Niagara Escarpment. The park is called the Sam Lawrence Park at Concession Street which is just south of Hamilton’s downtown core. The park has a walk where one can see a nice view of the downtown Hamilton skyline. This walk at Arkledun Avenue is a popular photography destination and quite breath-taking on a good day.
  25. Silurian Sponge? Coral?

    Hello, I can't seem to ID this fossil found in Silurian reef rock, Chicago area. I made some slices. Any help appreciated.
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