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Found 14 results

  1. shell litter

    From the album Arkona

    Typical spirifer litter from the Arkona Fm. They tend to be very fragile, so it is more common to find them in this state.
  2. Spirifer ID needed!

    Hey everyone, Here is one of my first fossils. My grandparents bought it for me quite a few years ago. The only info I have is this: Spirifer (no species?), found in the Holte de Bison (Belgium). I never heard of that location, and there are no results whatsoever about that location on Google... Do you know what species it is? And maybe you have an idea of where it could have been found (+ age)? Best regards, Max
  3. IMG-2903.JPG

    From the album Some Highlights from the PD weekend

    Mostly Mediosprifier with maybe the odd Mucrospirifer. Largest ones I've encountered compared to Arkona.
  4. The park has trails, outcrops and loose material. These from an outcrop under the power lines. ID's on a "looks like" basis. Gordon Grammysioidea alveata These G. alveata rather common but specimens are worn or don't remain intact. Paracyclas rugosa Mucrospirifer mucronatus Spinocyrtia granulosa
  5. Spirifer, Small

    From the album Carboniferous Fossils from Lawrence County, Missouri

    Burlington-Keokuk Formation Osagean Series, Lower Viséan (presumed) Lawrence County near Greene County border, Missouri, USA
  6. Spirifer, Large, superior view

    From the album Carboniferous Fossils from Lawrence County, Missouri

    Burlington-Keokuk Formation Osagean Series, Lower Viséan (presumed) Lawrence County near Greene County border, Missouri, USA
  7. Spirifer, Large, oblique view

    From the album Carboniferous Fossils from Lawrence County, Missouri

    Burlington-Keokuk Formation Osagean Series, Lower Viséan (presumed) Lawrence County near Greene County border, Missouri, USA
  8. New fieldtrip to the late and mid Devonian in the Ardennes from Belgium. This weekend I went with my friend Anthonie to a last minute field trip. The weather forecast were promising for that Sunday: gray but dry and decent temperatures so this was a possibility to make a last fieldtrip for this year. So Sunday morning I woke up early to leave for the fieldtrip… of course when I looked outside it was pouring. Still, hoping it could only get better I took the highway to Brussels, picked up my friend and we went to the direction of Marche en Famene for our first stop. It took us a one and a half hour drive in the rain to get there. Luckily the sky got a little less gray and the rain ended. We got to our first stop, a large construction site for a new industrial site. I went there before with my daughter with great success and I wanted to inspect the spot more closely. The huge construction pits exposed late Devonian schists (Frasnian), those deposits are well known to amateur collectors and can deliver a large quantity of spiriferid brachiopods, sometimes of very large dimensions. We spent almost 2 hours on the site, the bulldozers had done a great job clearing everything and we just had to pick up the brachiopods laying around everywhere. It was easy to fill up our bags and we only prospected a small part of the site. Apart from the huge amount of Spirifers, from which a few of them where around 3” we also found solitary corals, and a pair of gastropods. (probably Euomphalus sp.) We then took a quick lunch and headed to a new location a few miles further to a Quarry with mid. Devonian deposits (Givetian) This was the first time we prospected this site, so it took us a while before we could find a few decent fossils. The first ones we found were multiple large colonial corals and stromatolites, giving us a clue about this ancient reef and lagoon system. Most of those where too large to carry around, so we took a few pictures and we continued the prospection. In most parts of the quarry we found other large corals, but when we got to a scree we found multiple small solitary and colonial corals. We inspected this more closely an discovered lots of nice small fossils including a variety of very beautifully preserved brachiopods. After further prospection we went back to the car, making sure to pass by the first spot with the large corals. Where we each took a large specimen back to the car. We had still a little time on our hands and went to a 3rd location, an old quarry. When we got to this spot we were surprised to see that they started to fill up the location with debris. On the positive side the debris where mostly schists from a construction site. And again delivered a few nice spiriferid brachiopods, although very few in numbers. I think another group of collectors must have been screening those debris before us, a large amount of footprints where all around the place. We went to the back of the quarry to take a few extra pictures before heading back home. here I heard small pebbles falling from the cliff at the end of the quarry. We then saw quite a spectacular sight: a fox went down the cliff at an incredible speed, I thought he was stuck and would fell off, but halfway the cliff he went into a hole in the wall. Probably his den. We went closer to get a better sight but we made a new but gruesome discovery. A large dog lay dead at the bottom of the quarry. he probably fell of the cliff and it was not far of the den, so maybe this happened due to the dog chasing the fox. We took a picture of the collar, It had a cellphone number on it. We later contacted the owner to let him know what had happened to his dog. He was sad to hear the news, the dog was missing for two weeks after a hunting party, so this only confirmed our suspicions with the fox. After this incident we got back to the car and headed back home ( again raining during the whole trip) Although the day ended on a sad tone for the dog we did get a lot of great looking fossils. Il post updates of the finds after their first cleanup. Enjoy the pictures: Kevin 1st location: Late Devonian schists Looks like Santa came early this year: 2nd location: Mid Devonian reef deposits: 3rd location: note the piles of schists dumped in the quarry: Thanks to PaleoTony for the pictures.
  9. Spirifer Brachiopod

    From the album Mississippian Fossils from Northwest Arkansas

    Spirifer Brachiopod Mississippian Bentonville, Arkansas

    © ssx

  10. Spirifer Brachiopod

    From the album Mississippian Fossils from Northwest Arkansas

    Spirifer Brachiopod Mississippian Bentonville, Arkansas

    © ssx

  11. Spirifer Brachiopod

    From the album Mississippian Fossils from Northwest Arkansas

    Spirifer Brachiopod Mississippian Bentonville, Arkansas

    © ssx

  12. Spirifer Brachiopod

    From the album Mississippian Fossils from Northwest Arkansas

    Spirifer Brachiopod Mississippian Bentonville, Arkansas

    © ssx

  13. A few years ago I went collecting at my favorite fossil site here in NY. When I got to the main outcrop I soon noticed that there was a large pile of shale the fell away from the cliff. At first glance there were no fossils to be seen until I started splitting the larger pieces of shale. The only fossils I found were well preserved Eldredgeops and nothing else. In fact I found eight complete trilobites in this pile and it took me all day to process everything. After that I tried to repeat my first run at this layer but always come up with very meager results (partial Eldredgeops). Occasionally I would find a pyritized cephalopod but I'm not even sure that I'm collecting in the same horizon I found the trilobites in. Last week I went back to this locality after a gully washer cleaned the stream and exposed fresh shale. I was able to get at a large piece of shale from the trilobite layer. Splitting and splitting came up with nothing until I found a large pyrite cluster. Inside the pyrite were two large (3" x 2") spirifers that I thought were Mediospirifer. I told a friend about my find because it was the first time I have ever found brachiopods in this barren part of the Windom shale. He told me that they might be something else other then Mediospirifer like Spirifer marcyi. The Delthyrium is wider then Mediospirifer but I'm not a brachiopod expert so I would like to know what you think. Mikey
  14. Mucrospirifer.sp

    From the album My fossils collection

    Mucrospirifer.sp from Devonian period, Arkona Ontario Canada
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