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Found 74 results

  1. Hello. A while ago I purchased this specimen from a highly reputable and established seller. It's a T-Rex jaw fragment from Lance Creek, Wyoming, and was a surface find (see photos of the original specimen in situ; according to the finder, "the piece in question is at the very bottom left, on top of the edge of the longer bigger bone; the tooth grooves are face-down."). I'm reaching out to Fossil Forum for guidance along the following lines: 1) What part of the jaw is this most likely from? I've been studying images on-line at a cursory level, but I can't find the distinction convex part of the bone that my specimen has (the part that sticks out like a thin ridge). Any thoughts or, even better, photos of comparable specimens? 2) I trust the original seller, but since it was not found as part of a larger Rex specimen, I figured I'd ask for your confirmation: is this almost certainly a T-Rex? I'm fairly knowledgeable regarding teeth, but not mandibles. Thank you all very much in advance; any insight would be deeply appreciated. With best regards and gratitude, Ryan
  2. Hi all, I could not resist and purchased this tooth knowing it would be a tough call to make. It was found in the Hell Creek Fm. The big problem is the worn down mesial carina, there are however some remnant denticles I could measure, but not midline – more posterior. Taking them into consideration the tooth has distal 4.5 denticles per mm and mesial 6 per mm. The other measurements are: CH 1.47 cm / CBL 0.74 cm / CBW 0.39 cm. Based on this and the oval base I am leaning towards Dakotaraptor but might as well be a specific T-Rex tooth position.? I really need someone more experienced to take a look please. Any help is highly appreciated.
  3. Hello, I was doing a study on the T. rex and Nanotyrannus teeth specimens I had, and I wanted to compare them against a list of known T. rex teeth with measurement. The paper: Dental Morphology and Variation in Theropod Dinosaurs: Implications for the Taxonomic Identification of Isolated Teeth (JOSHUA B. SMITH, DAVID R. VANN, AND PETER DODSON) contains a list of 115 T. rex teeth. To make it easier to compare and read the data, I combined the measurements into a single chart, added colors and lines for ease of reading, and added the size and names of the T. rex used in the study Feel free to refer to the below chart for T. rex teeth measurements. I had to split the chart into 2 due to size limitations, but if you want the full-sized PDF version (25 MB), please message me so I can send it to you by email. If you have any suggestions to improve readability, or have your own data to add, go ahead and post it here! I will be posting pics and measurements of my various T. rex and Nanotyrannus teeth here @Troodon
  4. I found a mark of suspected skin in the deepest part of the large footprint of a suspected dinosaur? I found very little data on the toe skin marks on the Internet. Some people know what the skin texture is on the toes of large theropod dinosaurs?
  5. Hello All, So recently I've been doing a little bit of reading on random fossil news to pass the time, and I keep reading a lot of comments about "illegal fossils" and whatnot. One specific specimen that comes up a loooot in my readings is the T-Rex fossils. Some mention the legality of the issue, some mention the fact that they might be going to private collectors rather than museums, and many mention both. I understand why the scientific community might want to perform research on the specimen, but seeing as there are more than a single T-Rex fossil that belong to museums, shouldn't this be fine to sell a couple to collectors? Also when a fossil is considered "illegal" what exactly does it mean? Illegal as in illegal to find, illegal to keep if found, illegal to ship overseas, and/or illegal to sell? Thanks, -Em
  6. A Fantastic Day at the Old Burke

    As the lockdown continues and I can’t go on any new adventures here’s another amazing experience from my palaeontological back catalogue. A little shorter this time than my Burgess Shale story. I was back home from university for the Christmas holiday and decided to go with my family to the Burke Museum in Seattle. I’d been many times before as a child but this time I was going to see something special the Tufts-Love rex, and I got lucky. We had arrived in the morning just before they opened and were one of the only families there, as I was peering into the lab area trying to see as much as possible, the preparator stopped, came to the door and asked if I wanted to see it up close. Next thing I knew I was face to face with the T-rex. Looking at it up close you could see the fine detail in the bone where veins ran into the maxilla and the almost feathered texture of the supraorbital ridge. She even let me touch it, something I never expected a museum to allow me to do. Of course I couldn’t pass up the photo op. In the picture the googly eye is in the wrong place, it should be up a little higher where in its place one of the preparators put a sticky not saying “no more prepping in eye hole”. Clearly the temptation to continue in further and hollow out the skull while it was still half in block was just too strong. You can also see one of the nasal bones has been exposed and has been displaced. At the time I got to see it, they weren’t sure if this meant that the other was missing or how complete the other side of the skull was. Now that the skull has been fully prepared we know (There is a fantastic thread elsewhere on the forum by @Troodon documenting its preparation). 100% of the skeletal elements are present and it’s one of the most complete skulls ever found. I haven’t seen it fully prepared yet though, since I haven’t gotten back to the Burke since it has been renovated but next time I’m back in Seattle it’s the first thing I’m going to do. Thank you all for reading, Benton
  7. T-Rex Tooth?

    I found what looks like a couple t-rex teeth, there are 4 good size pieces and about 20 smaller pieces. Looks like a complete 2.5" tooth once I piece it together, maybe longer and another partial tooth. Is it T-rex? also what is the best way to glue the pieces together? Is it worth paying someone that knows what they are doing? Also would it be worth digging into that area and see if there are more?
  8. Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth

  9. Hi it is my Birthday today, and since it is my birthday I was going to get some fossils. I found this and am wondering if it’s a genuine tooth and if it’s a T-rex or not, if that’s possible through the sellers photos.
  10. Baby T-rex 3d print

    Here is my baby T-rex 3d print. 3d files came from https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/various/life-size-baby-t-rex-skeleton-part-01-10. This one took me about 8 months to complete.
  11. Moving a T-Rex

    https://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/t-rex-tristan-otto-dinosaurier-aus-berlin-zieht-um-a-79c202b0-2671-4abb-be0b-1fa9aec8c7ab https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tristan_Otto
  12. Seller thinks most likely to a T-rex. Found near the Hell Creek Formation.
  13. How strong could a t-rex's bite force be? What modern day animals could it compare it's bite force to?
  14. Nanotyrannus in Canada

    Hi the debate about Nanotyrannus got me thinking is Nanotyrannus found in Alberta Canada in the Scollard or Frenchmen Formations. If not then it could be valid since T-Rex is found there and if it’s a juvenile Rex then there should be a least some evidence for It there, since T-rex’s are found there. And if so this could provide Nanotyrannus’s range.
  15. I was searching the internet earlier today and found out that all Aublysodon teeth where that of Tyrannosaurinae juveniles. From Two medicine formation Daspletosaurus horneri, from Judith river formation and Dinosaur park formation Daspletosaurus sp., and from Hell creek and Lance formations T-rex, and so on... The study was done by Dr. Phil Currie, hope this helps with teeth like this!!
  16. Is nanotyrannus valid?

    Hello everyone, I know this is a big scientific debate and I have researched about it but I haven't come to a conclusion. What do you think? Thank you
  17. T rex or nanotyrannus teeth

    Hello everyone, after having seen many pictures of "nanotyrannus" and t rex teeth i have some questions. The first one being, how can paleontologists distinguish nano teeth from rex teeth and also sell them for a different price when the current theory is that they are the same dinosaur, also in many cases I have seen nano teeth with the same size as t rex teeth differentiated, so if they are the same dinosaur how can this be possible? Thank you for your time.
  18. Is this 100% authentic T-Rex bone

    Hello everybody, I wanted to buy T-Rex bone for a long,long time,and today,I found one on online that has reasonable price for it's size. I just want to know,is there any possible way for me to be 100% sure that it belonged to a real specimen of Tyrannosaurus Rex (not Daspletosaurus or some other dinosaur)? I would like to get opinion from you,but I won't buy it if I won't be 100% sure it's from T-Rex. Guy that sells them has 100% positive feedback on 96 sold items that are fossils. Here are the photos: https://imgur.com/7OiyfXH https://imgur.com/V1Z4rux https://imgur.com/cNSSRUP https://imgur.com/Ai5WPFZ https://imgur.com/1gn6vGP https://imgur.com/bV6y8Qn https://imgur.com/v281d2W https://imgur.com/ZuB9LzY As I said,I know it's hard to be absolute sure that this piece belonged to T-Rex,but I want to be as sure as possible. Kind regards, Petar EDIT:just to be sure,I don't know much about fossilization,since I'm an amateur,except that when animal die it get buried by sediments and it degrades over time (soft tissue,collagen,organs...) and all is left is bones.But are those fossils from dinosaurs actual bones or just an imprint of what just to be a bone? If I'm holding piece that belonged to some dinosaur,am I holding bone or just rock?
  19. Tyrannosaurid lips

    What do people think about tyrannosaurid lips?
  20. Hi everyone , i am new to this site and unsure how to go around yet . But the main reasons of my membership , i have been told by a nice person in Seattle to join your group . What i'm about to write is hard to believe , i don't know why such event is happening in my life . Long story short , North Lancaster Ontario , i as a hobby on my land with streams and river was looking for gold , there was lots by crushing rocks that i judged mineral decay of iron , pyrite and gold . The trouble is that i wasn't crushing stones but bones of dinosaurs that i came to realize one step at the time . Looking around , every rocks on the ground , streams and all of them were fossils where i finally seen the fossils on parts of dino's . I turned the table , upset with my stupid self crushing precious remains for a while . I then started to question the whole scene , well after another venture pushed by my curiosity i have found what appeared to be a part of a T-Rex , then i looked across the bridge i made to stack of rocks , piles of complete dinosaurs left by a farmer back long ago i presume . So still doubtful of every new information , i started following the shape of the T-Rex with a brush and a photo . It was one , one next to it , countless in back and around barn . they are not dug out yet . I left the ones that were rocks which are real nice to carry on my one dino . I seen many obvious spots around the acreages , i know , i am only 5 or 6 ft above the old Champlain sea , i also realized that my basement floor is the sea bed guess with what in , T=rex . I thought it was going a bit to far keep questioning myself . The bad parts of Paleontologists i'll leave for later , that makes my blood boil . broil .,,, I have now in a month of my new quest , 3 T-rex to undertake ??? put the puzzle across the creek together and i am still by myself after trying all avenues possible . my blood again lol .. Can someone help me thanks lots , Philippe
  21. I recently came across the young earth theory (the theory that earth is 10.000 years old and dinosaurs coexisted with humans and traveled with Noah and his ark) and of course i thought it was unfeasible but one common argument they keep having is why are we finding soft tissues, proteins and other biochemicals in fossils like triceratops, t-rex and other dinosaur bones of course that doesn't mean DNA BUT they shouldn't have been preserved because such biochemicals don't get preserved after so much time. Another one is that some old fossils are still close to the surface when they should be buried really deep. So what are your thoughts on these arguments, in my opinion this theory is ridiculous but i'd love to learn the answers. Thanks (PS sorry for asking that many questions these days its just that im new to the forum and have lots of questions)
  22. Theropod data for a computer science study.

    Hello I am working on my PhD in computer science and am working on collecting data for my thesis. I have been looking for a lot of data on theropod measurements like; teeth size, body mass, femur and tibia, length width, and other measurements (the more the better). I would like to collect samples from a few theropods like the T-Rex, Raptors, ect... and to have multiple skeleton for each. I need to have their measurement for my data points. I know that there are some journals that give detailed measurement for each fossil they find but I do not know how to search for them as each search yields vary results. Is there a certain key word that I should use to get the measurements for each fossil? I have been here https://paleobiodb.org/#/ but it does not look like the information that I need. Any help on this will be appreciated.
  23. Fossils on Wheels can officially say we are an elementary assembly program We will be doing two presentations for all of the students at Nord Country Day School. it is a small charter in the middle of farm country here. I personally love the single class presentations because they allow you to interact with the students in a more in-depth manner. The assembly style programs are our best way to travel to schools outside of city though. We can educate an entire school versus 30-35 students at a time. This is pilot program but it is very important to our future to develop a large scale traveling fossil program. Things are moving very quickly for us and we are starting to reach large numbers of students. A big leap forward for us and a chance to bring real fossils to an entire school. This will also be the debut for our Diplodocus fossil which is our largest piece. I am really excited to bring Dippy to a presentation.
  24. It is 47 cm in length and has a little restoration. It is from the Hell Creek formation in Montana.
  25. I recently got this tooth confirmed as T-rex, and I had another question about the same tooth. I’ve wondered about this for probably as long as I’ve had it. The tooth is around 7/8 of an inch long, missing a chunk out of the bottom right. Regardless of the missing chunk, how complete do you think it is length wise? Is it most of the total length of the tooth if it was a perfect fossil?
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