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Found 1,024 results

  1. Mystery Shark's teeth

    Hello, These are also from our hunt in the Aquia formation of Charles Co. MD. Sharks of the world didn't give me much insight. The only species that I noticed where the enamel extends out on to the roots like this is the extinct goblin shark Anomotodon novus. I definitely have some teeth from that species I think but these are substantially different. These are larger, more robust and the have the cool extended enamel and bumps/cusplets on the shoulders of the labial side. Any thoughts?? (ruler in mm and squares 1/4") Kate
  2. Stratolamia striata?

    Hello, I am new here and new to fossil identification. These are shark teeth from the Aquia formation on the Maryland side of the Potomac. They come from Charles County. I have shark teeth of the world and so my IDs are based on that and the internet. I think all of these are Stratiolamia striata based on the grooves. Ruler is in mm and squares are 1/4" on each side. The last picture with only 2 teeth nearly touching seem different to me in that the striations don't extend very far up onto the teeth (unlike the others where they cover much of the crown. I am not sure if S. macrota also occurs at this site?? They are supposed to have striation only near the root. I have more from this trip but limited time so it will have to dribble out. Thanks for your time, Kate
  3. Big Jaw Bone with Teeth

    This large jaw bone was found in the Peace River (Florida). I don't think it's fossilized, but it doesn't exactly look very-recent either. Surely Holocene I think, although I guess it could be older? Is it horse? Cow? Something else? Any help is appreciated. Thanks! (The brass scale cube measures 1cm square)
  4. Hi Everybody, I am trying to ID some fossils for my friends from the Royal Peacock Opal MIne. They have these fossils for display only at their gift shop but they are not really sure what they are. These are all miocene age fossils, Humboldt County, Nevada. I think the foot and the teeth are from some kind of small horse. I have no idea about the jaw with the teeth. Picture 1: Articulated foot bones from a horse? Picture 2-4: Jaw section from unknown mammal Picture 5-6: Bovine tooth, horse? Bison? camel? Picture 7: Bovine tooth, horse? horse? Bison? camel? Any IDs would be appreciated, Thanks, Jesse
  5. Help me identify these teeth

    We just got back from Florida and found a TON on teeth on Manasota Key beach. These are some of the interesting teeth we found that I can grab quickly. Any idea on what they are? I couldn't find a tape measure for scale but they are all roughly the size of a thumb nail. Thanks!!
  6. Hi so Iv'e posted a picture of this tooth before but I thought it was a great white but now after seeing other teeth on instagram I'm not sure. Is it a Great White or Carcharocles Angustidens and depending on which one it is than what does that mean for my hunting spot and what it has to offer in the future gravel I dig up?
  7. Took a quick 1 1/2 hour trip yesterday afternoon to a Pliocene deposit on a river here in eastern North Carolina. I believe it is Duplin Formation. Was the first one there when the water got low enough, found some nice stuff. The Pliocene there sits on top of Eocene Castle Hayne limestone, so I got a few echinoids as a bonus. Two 2 inch plus hastalis, a 1 1/2 inch great white. A 1 3/4 inch croc tooth. A nice vert some big tigers, a broken whale tooth and Cacharhinus sp. Also a nice ray tooth file. Possibly Aetobatus. The two echinoids are Eurhodia holmesi.
  8. ID Help Please

    These two, being as small as they are, have me confused. I am leaning toward mammoth on #5. Could #6 be Sloth? Any input is appreciated.
  9. After the Velociraptor skull, I finally finished another very long project: the baby T. rex skull designed by Inhuman Species, a 3D printed museum quality fossil replica of a 2-3 years old Tyrannosaurus rex. I really love this project and I made a video of the making from the 3D printing to the painting - I hope you like it. If you're wondering, I 3D printed the skull with the Alfawise U30 in PLA plastic; please watch the video and turn on subtitles to learn more about the tools and the making processes. If your're addicted or interested in 3D printing, you can't miss those topics:
  10. A week ago today, I took the day off work to hit one of my favorite sites, a roadcut above the Illinois River in Oglesby, Illinois. This cut exposes the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone member of the Bond Formation and produces abundant brachiopods as well as occasional other fauna including gastropods, cephalopods, coral, trilobites, and shark teeth. The weather was perfect, sunny but not too warm, when I pulled up. The cut is a somewhat unstable slope of cobbles and boulders of varying size, almost all with at least some fossils in them. To get up to the slope, you have to hop across a small ditch with running water. I have a good sampling of the common brachiopods from here, so I am looking for unusual fossils when I go now. I was very happy to quickly find a piece of trilobite as I started to search the rocks at the base of the hill. (I will put pics of everything I brought home in a response post) One interesting find that I was not able to bring home was this Linoproductus brachiopod with some shell preserved and a really pretty dendritic pattern on it- it was very delicate and firmly embedded in the middle of an ~80 lb boulder. I was able to stay for 4 hours, and I felt like I gave most of the site at least a quick look. I am very happy with what I found- I was able to check off many of the rarer things I was looking for, including shark teeth, a trilobite, cephalopod material, and a brachiopod with spines attached, as well as some nice crystallized brachiopods. I will post all of my finds below.
  11. Picked up this beautiful pathological Cuban Meg Tooth a couple days ago. It measures 5.25” with a killer twist.
  12. Primate Teeth fossils help fill gap in fossil record https://phys.org/news/2019-05-tooth-fossils-million-year-old-gap-primate.amp
  13. Fossilized gum and teeth ?

    I need help identifying these teeth and petrified gums. My neighbor received a load of gravel from a quarry in Kansas. I asked if i could look for fossils etc. And I found these teeth. They are 1 1/2 inches long. Thank you
  14. Fish teeth? Whale teeth?

    Found a few of these teeth on the beach (dredged material) in Wilmington, NC. They seem awfully small to be whale teeth. Anyone?
  15. Help identifying tooth

    Is it possible to narrow down what type of mosasaur a tooth came from? Found a tooth but it looks different from the typical ones I see all over google. Thanks!
  16. Sharks' teeth from Belgium

    Dear teeth and bones' experts I need some help to ID a lot of sharks' teeth that I got from Belgium. 90% of them have no ID. Here is the overall picture of the lot (with numbers of groups): The seller put them in separate packages, so I took the pictures as he grouped them. This is the most numerous group no.1 - to the right on the first picture:
  17. Where to get 1/8th stainless mesh

    Hey guys, new here. So I made a few of the shark tooth sifters with pool noodles. They work great but I can only find the 1/4th wire. Does anyone know who sells the 1/8th mesh that's stainless? I tried window screen material and that's awful in my opinion. Recently ordered a pan sifter off Amazon and it had the stainless wire 1/8th in it. But I need sheets to make my own. The 1/4th catches bigger teeth fine but the sand shark teeth usually pass thru the 1/4th mesh.
  18. Hi! I am new to this forum and have been asking some questions the last two days! I found this fossil in sale by a very reputable seller. As it is going to be my first big fossil I would like to know your opinions about it! Is it a good example of this species? I am really new to this hobby so any informations on this would be very appreciated! Thank you all for your time!
  19. Hi there, The kids had a nice few little finds today at Walton On The Naze, Essex (UK). We got there just as the tide was revealing the beach so had some nice fresh cliff fall and stoney sand to sort through. Rest assured that any help advising what their finds may be will be greeted with great enthusiasm and excitement! (They are 5 and 8 - and very excited to post this here!). Thank you, G.
  20. Hi, All. Okay - I'm trying to learn here, so please bear with me! I've been told that many of the teeth I've acquired here in Niger have been croc teeth, and that one of the ways to tell a croc tooth is by a circular base (basil?), while spinosauridae teeth are more oval.... That said, I offer the following two teeth for your informed evaluation! The bigger one is relatively narrow (the side shot with the enamel curving over the top gives you an idea), with the smaller one has a distinct "ridge" on each front/back (I know those aren't the technical terms - sorry!). As always, I greatly appreciate the education that you folks are giving me - thank you! Rob @Troodon @Haravex @jpc @LordTrilobite
  21. Hello, I lack teeth in my collection from the Bissekty and a number of theropod teeth have popped up on a popular auction site from a seemingly reliable seller. None of them are super special but I am curious if I should pull the trigger or wait for better material? I don't see Bissekty material often and would have trouble doing a proper ID.. Thank you
  22. Curved Aurora teeth

    I found this trio of strange teeth in a bucket of Lee Creek fossil matrix. All 3 are slightly less than one inch in length and seem vaguely cetacean or reptilian. Of course, they could be claws instead of teeth. There are several other mystery fossils I found, but for some reason only 2 photos can be uploaded at a time, so I'll have to make a separate post for each fossil.
  23. Since the weather is (finally) behaving and the Peace River water level has now stabilized at a depth where South Florida fossil hunters can get in and get their hunt on, Tammy and I found a free day in our busy schedule and planned a day trip to Arcadia to try our luck on the Peace River again. If we do not drive over and spend the night in a local hotel, hunting on the Peace River involves an early morning wake-up call at the painfully early hour of 3:00 AM. We're all packed up and leaving the house at just around 4:00 AM with a long quiet drive through mostly empty highways--up the Florida Turnpike to the aptly named Beeline Hwy which makes a beeline straight northwest for the town of Okeechobee at the northern tip of Lake Okeechobee (the large lake that looks like it was hole punched out of the map of Florida). A stop for something approximating breakfast at the 24-hour Micky D's in Okeechobee (bring a jacket if you go because the AC is set for 60F ) and then it's a straight show west on State Road 70 into Arcadia. When we arrive we make a quick stop for a bag of ice for our cooler and a few snacks for the day. Then we roll into Canoe Outpost to fill out our paperwork and wait for the bus to take us to the put-in location. As we had a free day to make this trip on a Tuesday, Canoe Outpost is far from busy--in fact we are the only ones there save two employees who had to come in early to tend to our canoe rental needs. Today's hunting area of choice is on the lower half of the normal full-day rental. Usually, we put in at Brownville Park some 8.5 miles upstream of the Canoe Outpost dock and we stop at various locations along the way. We wanted to focus on some spots downstream from their half-day put-in location at the primitive campground area that is owned by Canoe Outpost (called Oak Hill). We've wanted to get dropped off here on some weekends when we only wanted to hunt along the lower 4 miles of the river above Arcadia but usually they have others going to Brownville on the 8:00 AM run and we just end up getting put-in there. We spend the first hour paddling the 4.5 miles down to the half-day put-in. This time we were lucky--nobody else was signed-up to go out at 8:00 AM so they were accommodating enough to put us in at the halfway point and save us an hour of paddling. We enjoy the peaceful paddling down the river looking for birds and spotting gators along the banks but the thought of saving an hour of paddle time was too good to pass up--more time for sifting. We made it down to the spot where we had found some nice armadillo bits two weeks before--a tooth and an astragalus from Holmesina septentrionalis a two meter beastie clocking in at around 250 kg. According to Dr. Hulbert specimens from this species are pretty rare in South Florida and the astragalus that we found last trip is earmarked for the FLMNH next time we are in Gainesville as the museum does not have any specimens of this bone from this species in its collection. We were hoping to possibly find some additional Holmesina bits though that was a long shot at best. We poked around the site chasing down areas with nice chunky gravel hoping to find some nice items and though we struck out extending our Holmesina finds we did come across a few nice items. On only the first handful of screens, a familiar triangular shape appeared in the sifting screen. Though the root was a bit dinged, this meg tooth that topped out at just about 3 inches is just shy of the 3.25 inch size that most teeth seem to max out at in the Peace River. A little while later a beautifully shaped smaller meg (just under 2 inches) turned up in the sifting screen. Here are some in situ (well, in sifter anyway) images of those teeth at the moment they revealed themselves. A little while later (after many smaller shark teeth and broken megs--fraglodons) we turned up one of the larger Carcharhinus teeth I've seen come from the Peace River. It was a nice surprise to see such a large example of a requiem shark tooth. No more interesting shark teeth turned up though we did find quite a number of the normal nickel and dime (size) teeth which will end up in an ever growing jar of teeth on display in the family room. Two other novelties helped to make the day a successful hunt in the record books. I turned up a tiny unerupted tooth that I believe to be tapir peccary though I've never seen one with six cusps (two small ones off one side). EDIT: Fixed ID, see below. As with many of these teeth the hollow nature of the tooth and fragile roots mean that usually only the enamel crown are recovered--at least this pretty little thing is solidly in one piece. The other tooth is a bit of a mystery. I'm sure @Harry Pristis will likely recognize this as it looks reasonably distinctive. The tooth looks like it has a complete crown (no parts missing) but it only has a trace of the roots left. Looking at the photos I can see that there are cracks forming on this tooth and it looks like it is ready to disarticulate into a puzzle of pieces. I think I'll be attempting to consolidate this item a bit with some B72. There is less than a month to go before the official start of rainy/hurricane season in June. Hoping to find some time in my schedule to make it back out to the river a few more times. It's been an extremely shortened season this year but the few finds we have been able to make have been enjoyable. Cheers. -Ken
  24. Cetacean? teeth from the Yorktown

    hi all, Here are three teeth from the Pliocene Yorktown at LC. When found, I was told "pilot whale", which hasn't helped much. I do believe that they are from a tooth cetacean though. Could anyone hazard a guess as to genus/species? thanks in advance
  25. Teeth ID (solved : horse incisors)

    Need help identifying these teeth/tusks (4cm long) I found in Rhodes (Greece). Since the area was a landslide caused by waters flowing over different layers of sediment (clay, marl, sandstone) the resulting mix contained both sea (shells) and land (pine cone impressions) fossils I cannot give a clear estimate of age, just place it somewhere within the upper Pliocene - lower Pleistocene boundaries.
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