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Found 51 results

  1. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Emmonsia Coral, a Colony Coral SITE LOCATION: Beachriver Formation of the Brownsport Formation along Hwy. 641 in Decatur Co., Tennessee TIME PERIOD: Silurian Period (ca 430 mission years old) Favositida is an extinct suborder of prehistoric corals in the order Tabulata. The tabulate corals, forming the order Tabulata, are an extinct form of coral. They are almost always colonial, forming colonies of individual hexagonal cells known as corallites defined by a skeleton of calcite, similar in appearance to a honeycomb. Adjacent cells are joined by small pores. Their distinguishing feature is their well-developed horizontal internal partitions (tabulae) within each cell, but reduced or absent vertical internal partitions (septae). They are usually smaller than rugose corals, but vary considerably in shape, from flat to conical to spherical. Around 300 species have been described. Among the most common tabulate corals in the fossil record are Aulopora, Favosites, Halysites, Heliolites, Pleurodictyum, Sarcinula and Syringopora. Tabulate corals with massive skeletons often contain endobiotic symbionts, such as cornulitids and Chaetosalpinx. Like rugose corals, they lived entirely during the Paleozoic, being found from the Ordovician to the Permian. With Stromatoporoidea and rugose corals, the tabulate corals are characteristic of the shallow waters of the Silurian and Devonian. Sea levels rose in the Devonian, and tabulate corals became much less common. They finally became extinct in the Permian–Triassic extinction event. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Tabulata Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Emmonsia
  2. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Emmonsia Coral, a Colony Coral SITE LOCATION: Beachriver Formation of the Brownsport Formation along Hwy. 641 in Decatur Co., Tennessee TIME PERIOD: Silurian Period (ca 430 mission years old) Favositida is an extinct suborder of prehistoric corals in the order Tabulata. The tabulate corals, forming the order Tabulata, are an extinct form of coral. They are almost always colonial, forming colonies of individual hexagonal cells known as corallites defined by a skeleton of calcite, similar in appearance to a honeycomb. Adjacent cells are joined by small pores. Their distinguishing feature is their well-developed horizontal internal partitions (tabulae) within each cell, but reduced or absent vertical internal partitions (septae). They are usually smaller than rugose corals, but vary considerably in shape, from flat to conical to spherical. Around 300 species have been described. Among the most common tabulate corals in the fossil record are Aulopora, Favosites, Halysites, Heliolites, Pleurodictyum, Sarcinula and Syringopora. Tabulate corals with massive skeletons often contain endobiotic symbionts, such as cornulitids and Chaetosalpinx. Like rugose corals, they lived entirely during the Paleozoic, being found from the Ordovician to the Permian. With Stromatoporoidea and rugose corals, the tabulate corals are characteristic of the shallow waters of the Silurian and Devonian. Sea levels rose in the Devonian, and tabulate corals became much less common. They finally became extinct in the Permian–Triassic extinction event. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Tabulata Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Emmonsia
  3. Cretaceous Vertebrae

    Hello everyone, I found this in a Cretaceous deposit in West Tennessee. I am not sure what critter it comes from. I haven't had the time to really clean it up, so it had some matrix on it still. The sure contains marine reptiles, shark, and fish remains, and occasionally terrestrial material. Please let me know what you think and if you need more pictures. My thumb is about 3cm wide.
  4. Help with identifying

    Hoping someone can identify what I found. Found in Smyrna Tennessee July 31 2017. Size is 2" x 2" x 3/8" thick Thanks
  5. Mammal Partial Jaw From Gray, TN

    Hello! A friend of mine found this fossil a long time ago on the grounds of Gray Fossil Site (before it was actually established). I believe it belongs to some sort of mammal, but since my main focus is on sharks and dinosaurs, I'm not quite sure. Anyone have an idea of what it may belong to?
  6. Please help ID

    Hi! My boys and I found this while exploring a river bed. Any ideas what it is? At first I thought we had found a tooth but researching suggests I may have found horn coral? Pictures I have found online are not that helpful so thought I would try here. So cool that we can find fossils right here where we live!
  7. Mystery ID

    I recently found this piece hunting in a suburb of Chattanooga, TN. I'm unsure as to whether it's Ordovician or possibly early Mississippian due to some of my more recent finds. I personally think it's some type of coral, but not rugosa coral which I typically find.
  8. I found these 2 pieces antiquing in Tennessee (the shell?) and Florida (the coral piece). I realize these pieces didn't necessarily originate in these states...The color of the shell is interesting to me (goldish) and it has some sheen on some parts but not all over. (natural or lacquered?) What does the color tell us? It was in a baggie and simply labeled "fossil". The coral measures 5 1/4" tall. I know it's coral but was wondering if it is fossilized. Any info on either would be greatly appreciated. Fossil? Period? Any other interesting tidbits relative to where I found them, i.e. could this shell have been found in Tennessee? The coral, if a fossil, I'm assuming could have originated in Florida? I think they are beautiful and find them so interesting .
  9. Hi, I live in the Memphis, TN area, and I am wondering if there is anywhere local to find some fossils. I am new to the hobby, and I'm not very picky on what I'm hunting for. I have heard about finding gravel bars on the Mississippi River, and also nonconnah creek. I'm not sure where to start looking at either location. Any advice is appreciated, thanks in advance!
  10. Nonconnah creek Shelby county TN

    I spent about an hour digging a cut bank of Nonconnah creek in south Shelby county along the Mississippi Tennessee border just south of Memphis. I was told not to get my hopes up, but I think I may have found a few fossils! The item marked 3 is cylindrical and about 1cm long. I'm not sure about the large item with the pen cap for scale. The entire thing is about the size of a baseball, wasn't sure if the hole on top was just that, or possibly an eye of sort. (Same item is photographed from the back as well)
  11. Two cool fossils - no idea what they are

    Both of these were found in Middle Tennessee, not far from Nashville. The area is now a lake, but use to be a river before a dam was built. The first one with the indentations is about 3 inches in length. The one that looks like a bone (but probably isn't?) is about 5.5 inches long and 2.5 inches tall at its tallest point. Any ideas? thanks.
  12. Is this a fossil clam mold?

    Can someone tell me if this is a fossil clam mold? Found at a barn in East Tennessee. Unsure where it was originally found but he thought he might have found it in a river in the mountains. It measures approximately 3.5" long by 2.5" wide by 1.25 deep. The main body part is gray with some brown hints and the center band part is lighter whitish gray and also has some tiny holes at it's edges. Obviously I'm not an expert but I think it is interesting regardless. Help appreciated!
  13. Help identify

    Found along hiking trail. Believed to be large breed dog.
  14. Need help with identification

    Maybe some type of Brachiopod, or Coral
  15. I like to look for rocks in Tennessee (almost the Kentucky Border). This one I picked up thinking it was horn coral, but I do not see the normal markings on horn coral. I have never seen the "curl" on the end of any rock look this. Possible shell? Curious what everyone thought.
  16. Any kid friendly fossil sites along interstate 40 n 75 that I can take my family for few hours? Just want to see what Tennessee got to offer. We are on vacation in South Carolina and will drive back to Wisconsin this weekend. We want to make few stops to stretch our legs as we don't want to drive all day. Any recommendations? I'll love to meet some of you guys and enjoy have boys looking for fossils. Older boy aged 6 really want to find his first trilobite.
  17. Need ID Please - Possible Mosasaur vert?

    I found this down in our creek in Tennessee and thought it looked like a vertebrae, I chiseled it out of a rock and brought it home. I don't know what it is but the closest thing i could find is a small tail vertebrae of a mosasaur. I need help ID'ing this because I'm not just gonna jump to the conclusion that thats it because a lot of times its just a look a like rock, However I have handled fossils before and this feels like bone. Let me know what you think please.
  18. This is a rock/fossil found in grandparents rock bed. I believe it to be a fossilised lizard on top of a rock. When I studied it, I noticed the lizard shape and, on the bottom side, what seemed to be an engraving that looked interesting. I tried to write down the symbols I saw and research them and came up with something similar to the Mayan writing for lizard. Looking for any advice/input on this intriguing piece. Thanks!top view of fossilup-close side view of fossil top-down view of bottom side containing what I believe to be an engravingScreenshot of Mayan representation of a lizard, close to the engraving on the bottom
  19. Fossil Sponge? Found in central Tennessee

    This was found on a relative's farm in central Tennessee about 20 years ago. It looks like a sponge, and a museum I took it to a long time ago said it was, but I wanted to know what you guys thought. Other fossils found on the same farm include shells, coral, and tool fragments made from antlers. Some of the holes in the fossil go all the way through. Whatever it turns out to be, it's pretty cool-looking.
  20. Found in Nashville Tennessee

    Hello. I know almost nothing about fossils. I found this in Nashville, Tennessee. I left it where I found it, but if I recall correctly it was about a foot long. I looked online to see what other similar fossils were found here but didn't see one like this. Any help?
  21. Help with this please

  22. Orthocone Identification [SOLVED]

    Found this fossil in a creek in middle Tennessee. I originally thought it was a crinoid column, until user ynot pointed out that it was more than likely an orthocone shell. Judging from where it was found, it seems to be from the Ordovician. So now my question is: what species of orthocone do you think it is? Note the size (5 1/2" long, 2" wide) and the segmented pattern. Thanks for the help!
  23. is this a trilobite

    Hello all, newb here. I purchased a house a year ago and have been finding various fossils, geodes, and indian artifacts. Mainly what ive been finding is crinoid stems, brachiopods, and horn coral. Initially when i looked down and saw this i thought it was a crinoid stem and almost didnt pick it up since im over-run. the "bottom" edge was what was exposed. I looked at pics online and the closest guess i can make is trilobite but I am very uncertain in that thought. Any help please.
  24. Hello everybody. I would very much appreciate your opinion on a fossil you can see on the picture. It's from Tennessee - Ordovician - Chickamauga group. Thanks.
  25. Ordovician Brachiopod

    From the album Ordovician Fossils from Tennessee

    Brachiopods - Chickamauga Group / Ordovician - from East Tennessee
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