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Found 347 results

  1. Near the Dutch town of Winterswijk is an Eldorado for fossil lovers. A student has now analyzed pieces from museums and (primarily) private collections for his master's thesis. He found an amazing amount of almost completely preserved skeletons, between 242 and 247 million years old. The good condition is presumably due to particularly favorable development conditions. LINK
  2. More coelacanths from the Triassic

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    Another partial coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Front half of fish including complete skull and first dorsal on bottom, with partial lower skull in the upper right. Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, New Jersey. Old Granton Quarry. Scale is in CM.

    © 2019 T. Jones

  3. Partial coelacanth body

    From the album Late Triassic Lockatong Formation

    Partial coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Scale is in CM. Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, New Jersey. Old Granton Quarry.

    © © 2019 T. Jones

  4. microbial Utah

    Microbial deposits in the aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction: A diverging case from the Mineral Mountains(Utah, USA) EMMANUELLE VENNIN, NICOLAS OLIVIER, ARNAUD BRAYARD, IVAN BOUR, CHRISTOPHE THOMAZO, GILLES ESCARGUEL, EMMANUEL FARA, KEVIN G. BYLUND, JAMES F. JENKS, DANIEL A. STEPHEN and RICHARD HOFMANN Sedimentology (2015)62, 753–792 NB 170 MB One more P/Tr article with "aftermath" Any more and I'll have conniptions And now for the serious part:this is seriously good. ..really Yes it's large,in both memory space and number of pages,but the subject merits exhaustive treatment. 11 out of ten for this one Mathematically impossible,you say? Hah!
  5. Triassic cephalopoda

    GUE SPATHIAN (LOWER TRIASSIC) AMMONOIDS FROM WESTERN USA (IDAHO, CALIFORNIA, UTAH AND NEVADA) Jean Guex Alexandre Hungerbühler James F. Jenks Luis O’Dogherty Viorel Atudorei David G. Taylor Hugo Bucher Annachiara Bartolini Mémoire de Géologie (Lausanne), n°49, 2010 about 16 MB the contributing authors are dyed-in-the-wool experts on the Triassic @andreas
  6. Dinosaurs in Gettysburg

    I happened to be in Gettysburg for the weekend, and I remembered an article I had read a while back. It said something about Dinosaur prints at the Gettysburg battlegrounds. So I took a trip to the location and took a look around, here’s the prints I could see with all the rain: Clearest two, it’s a foot and hand from Atreipus milfordensis.
  7. From the album Triassic

    Diplurus newarki (partial coelacanth including most of tail, some vertebrae, and ribs, etc.) Upper Triassic Lockatong Formation Newark Supergroup Old Granton Quarry site North Bergen, New Jersey
  8. Triassic Pterosaur Found In Utah

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/rare-desert-pterosaur-fossil-discovered-utah-180969995/
  9. https://phys.org/news/2018-11-ancient-skeletons-ancestors-giant-dinosaurs.html https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1048164/dinosaur-discovery-brazil-Royal-Society-social-life-Biology-Letters-santa-maria-university http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/deadthings/2018/11/20/dinosaur-brazil/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A DiscoverBlogs (Discover Blogs)
  10. Icthyosaur drawings

    Tried my hand at two different styles of drawing an icthyosaur. Don't exactly remember the species I was going for but I remember that it and the fish are both from the Jurassic. this one is a bit more realistic. and this is a cartoony representation.
  11. Lit.: G. H. Xu, L. J. Zhao, and C. C. Shen. 2015. A Middle Triassic thoracopterid from China highlights the evolutionary origin of overwater gliding in early ray-finned fishes. Biology Letters 11:2014960 A. Tintori. 2015. Setting the record straight for fossil flying fishes versus non-flying ones: a comment on Xu et al . (2015). Biology letters 11(11) DOI:10.1098/rsbl.2015.0179 Xu G-H, Zhao L-J. 2015. From Potanichthys to Wushaichthys: resolving the evolutionary origin and reproductive strategy of the Thoracopteridae: a reply to Tintori (2015). Biol. Lett. 11: 20150604. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2015.0604 Obviously, the Zhao et al. and A. Tintori disagree whether this is a Thoracopteridae (a "flying fish") or a Peltopleuridae.
  12. Turimetta Beach Trips

    Hi all, I've recently visited Turimetta Beach a few times this past month and thought I'd post some pictures of what I've found. I would love to hear your thoughts on them. Attached are some ferns, Pleuromeia cones (Cylostrobus sydneyensis) and something I originally thought was similar to fish scales but I really have no clue. Thank you @Paleoworld-101 for the assist in figuring out the cones. Will attach more of what I've found, and probably add to this in future if I find more cool stuff.
  13. Is this fossilised wood/bark?

    Hi, First time post of this site so hopefully I’ve made it correctly, seems to be heaps of knowledgeable/passionate people here. Just wondering if anyone can indentify this for me? It looks like Fossiled pieces of bark. It’s approximately 60cms long, 25cms wide and 3cms thick. In three joining pieces. I found it near a quarry in Ipswich Queensland Australia that is mostly shale and contains Triassic marker plants such as Dicroidium. Any help would be appreciated.
  14. Eosemionotus sp.

    The Prosanto Fm. is a " Small lagoonal basin [pool] in the intertidal platform of the Vallatscha Fm. with anoxic bottom waters. Agitated surface waters deposit tempestite layers as well as mud, which forms very regular drapes." Furrer et al. 1985. Currently, a manuscript is being published describing three more new species of the genus Eosemionotus. Dr. Adriana Lopez-Arbarello (Munich) is in charge of this work. Lit.: T. Buergin et al.: The Prosanto Formation - a middle Triassic fossil Lagerstatte of the Silvretta Nappe (Graubünden Canton, Switzerland) with a rich ichthyofauna. January 1991, Eclogae Geologicae Helvetiae 84(3):921-990
  15. Lit.: SCHWEITZER, C., FELDMANN, R.,HU, S.,HUANG, J., ZHOU, C., ZHANG, Q.,WEN, W., Xie, T.(2014): PENAEOID DECAPODA (DENDROBRANCHIATA) FROM THE LUOPING BIOTA (MIDDLE TRIASSIC) OF CHINA: SYSTEMATICS AND TAPHONOMIC FRAMEWORK. Journal of Paleontology, 88(3), 2014, p. 457–474 Quote: "Although the lobsters were interpreted as having relatively durable cuticle, the shrimp discussed herein are characterized by having very thin cuticle that is readily deformed and oriented in a variety of positions. As a result, the description and interpretation of the morphology of the shrimp is, of necessity, a composite of several specimens; however, fine detail of many parts of the skeletal anatomy is exquisite."
  16. Lungfish tooth!

    Hi guys, last week I started studying so I don't have much time at the moment and because of that I can't be very active here. Nevertheless I could go hunting last weekend (related to my eighteenth birthday (so why I am still a youth member?? )). I was in a quarry near Stuttgart where you can find fossils from the Triassic. Looking for bones and teeth in the "Bonebed" there is quite strenuous but it makes always fun! Especially if you find something good And my best find was this lungfish tooth (Ceratodus): Never found something like that before so I am quite happy with it! It's about 2.5 cm long and I prepped it with my air pen and with my new sandblasting machine! The prep work took about 1 hour. I can't really estimate how rare such a find is but maybe @Pemphix can say more! Thanks for viewing
  17. Hi, next month I am going to Paleotime, a fossil fair in Belgium and I am hoping to find a Keichousaurus fossil. Now I know their are lots of fakes out there (although after doing some reading on this forum most of them I came to the understanding most of them aren’t entirely faked, just enhanced, painted and composites) And I am going to be honest, I don’t really care that much if the Keichou is a little bit enhanced of painted. But I hope to find a specimen that is at least 75 % or more authentic. So I was hoping if you guys could give me some tips as to what I should look for when I examine a specimen I hope to buy, cause since I will buy it at the fair, I won’t be able to post picture here during the process. I know that these are some of the thing I already have to look for to enhance the chance of getting an authentic one · Missing bones · Broken bones · Strange or akward poses · Imperfections (fake always try to be as beautiful and perfect as possible) · Calcite cracks running through the skeleton · Looking for detailing in the skull like teeth and obvious skull fragments · Looking for paint with a magnifying glass · Taking a picture and doing a negative to see paint mischief · Looking for 3D relief on the specimen These are the things I know of the look for, but does anyone else have some tips for me on how to recognize it’s a genuine of faked piece. I will also be taking my LED Mini microscope 60x for on the phone with me for closer examination. Thanks in advance!
  18. Unidentified tooth and weird dino bone

    Hi! I have some question marks about some of my fossils that I bought early as a child. I have a tooth that was labelled as coelophysis, I know its not a coelophysis, everything about it is wrong for being that, I cant remember where it was found , but if someone has an idea what it possibly/maybe can be its good enough for me. The other fossil is a dinosaur Bone fragment which according to what i can remember is from hell creek formation and was labelled as triceratops. Im mostly curious to know why it looks like it does because it doesnt look like a normal fragment to me, it also has some unusal textures within a convex circle. Sorry for the mediocre photos, My mobile camera has the Specs of a potato. If you need to see more or better photos, just let me know and I will use another camera
  19. Interesting article in the NYT (New York Times) today on a fossil lizard called Megachirella. You may need subscription to view. However, they usually allow a certain number of free viewings per month. You might include this in yours. Cheers. Megachirella article
  20. L.S., Thought it would be fun to share this "chance encounter" I had at a mineral show. The photograph below shows a slab of petrified wood from the Triassic of the Isalo II Fm. of Madagascar. When material from this locality is offered for sale (which happens often and in large quantities), it is usually labelled as "Araucarioxylon" or simply as "petrified wood" (where the latter may actually be better). While most of the wood indeed has an "Araucaria-like" anatomy (see Rössler et al. 2014 for a recent discussion on the nomenclature), I recently was lucky enough to "find" something else. While the left-most photograph may not directly show it, the anatomy of this particular slab is quite different from the common Araucaria-like specimens. I tried to clarify the anatomy by contouring the main structures seen, which hopefully makes visible how this wood consists of multiple rings of perimedular bundles and wedge-shaped structures, showing both centripetal and centrifugal xylem (inward and outward growing regions, per as provisionally indicated by the blue and red arrows). This curious growth form (by modern wood standards, at least) is characteristic for the stems of some groups of Mesozoic seed ferns, such as those from the Umkomasiales order. The best-known genus with this type of anatomy is probably Rhexoxylon (see Archangelsky and Brett 1961), but there are more similar genera, making it difficult to arrive at a more specific identification.
  21. 3 D fossil musem...

    I'm thinking of creating an online 3 D version of my website, but not sure if the image will display on different setups.... I've included a link to an example of a piece of petrified wood (a piece I purchased). I have done some experiments in the field with my setup, I think 3 D in-situ photos would be possible. I've attache a 2 D picture as well. Any feedback appreciated. http://www.safossils.com/petrifiedwood.html Thanks, Walt
  22. Made an incredible discovery at home tonight when I noticed tiny baby dinosaur tracks about only 5.1mm long on a ripple slab I had found. I've never seen baby footprints so small before, so I'm amazed. No wonder I didn't notice them for nearly two weeks after I had found them this month! Since there seems to be a partial adult on the edge it makes me wonder if this dinosaur was walking with its new born baby.
  23. Coelophysis tooth ?

    Would this be a Coelophysis tooth form Bull Canyon Formation of San Miguel County, NM ?
  24. Dilophosaurus ??? footprint

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Eubrontes: Dilophosaurus ? Raised relief (footprint coated to stand out). 200 mya Triassic Erving, Massachusetts . Connecticut River valley. Clay sandstone **Sadly, something smudged the tip of the middle toe while still wet, and ruined the beautiful claw mark. Heel to middle claw tip = 10", & from tip of right claw to top of left claw = 8". The 2 main types you commonly see are Eubrontes and Grallator, but Eubrontes is different, as it is apparently understood to be pretty much dilophosaurus footprints. (Citation???) I know there are probably sometimes others' footprints that will fall under the name, but it seems to be to the point of Eubrontes almost being synonymous with dilophosaurus. (Citation???) I KNOW I'm going to take flak for labeling this as just "dilophosaur", and I understand why, but all in all, in this case I feel completely comfortable and safe using the name without a qualifier. I'm very sorry to all who are bothered and annoyed by it
  25. Hi, a month back I bought these two plant fossils at a shop. But unfortunatly the guy at the store forgot to put the information card of them in the box. :/ What I can remember reading when I bought them was that they were from the Triassic era and that they were found in the Bruchsal area in Germany. But that's unfortunatly all I could remember, I don't know their exact age or species. I tried to research the exact age of the fossils found in that area or what species can be found there, but unfortunatly in my search I did not find any anwsers, only one guy with pictures of the same fossil species from the same area and age, but unfortunatly I did not get a reply back from the guy. So I was hoping one of you guys here could help me to ID the fossil. Thanks in advance! photo hosting
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