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Found 1,594 results

  1. Hey all! I'm a huge newbie to actually fossil hunting, though I've been seeking out museums, collections, and building my own personal collection of geological specimens for most of my life. I know that Kentucky is a major state for prehistoric, oceanic fossils and I would love to start hunting & collecting on my own. I've researched for a few months now and as far as I've gotten are some parks/areas near Cincy and Lou. I am not opposed to driving whatsoever, but I am local to the Winchester/Lexington area and I would love to know of some closer sites that I could visit more frequently - especially after heavy rains that may bring up some new specimens. I'd frankly love to find anything from precious stones to any sort of fossil, especially trilobites! I know finding a dinosaur or larger fauna would be a freak miracle at best, so anything fossilized or geological would be incredible! I'm open to any suggestions and out of the way sites; can't wait to see what y'all know of!!
  2. Hello. I saw this trilobite piece on display and was wondering if anyone could tell me more about it. I believe it is fake or heavily composited. Do the trilobites shown come from the same time period? Also, would trilobites and starfish be found together like this? The owner thinks the trilobites are real but have been composited together. Is there any way to verify this? Thanks for any help.
  3. Some trilobites I have from Guanshan Biota: Breviredlichia granulosa Undescribed Redlichia sp. Juvenile R. yunnanensis A pair of unpreped B. granulosa.
  4. Genal spine?

    Came across this small fossil (4mm). It appears to be a ventral genal spine, but I could be wrong. Upper Ordovician. Any idea what species?
  5. I met a teacher recently who showed me this trilobite that she found many years ago in western NY. It's probably Devonian, since other rocks she collected nearby contain apparent Phacops (Eldredgeops) tails. I know it would help a lot to have the head exposed, but before she pays for it to be prepped, she is wondering if anyone can ID it based on the exposed portion. I'm no a trilobite expert, but based on the tail I am wondering if it could be a proeitid such as Pseudodechenella, which I understand is pretty rare. Can anyone confirm that or offer other suggestions? Thanks!
  6. ID on a fossil from Decorah Formation, MN

    I found this plate near in the upper decorah formation Minnesota (Ordovician period limestone). These chunks are frequently littered with trilobite bits and fragments but this lookk a little odd to me. It has a "knob" or bump structur on one side and a gradual bend on the other. Its still partially covered by coral and debris but most of it is exposed. Any ideas?
  7. Two of my weeks formation trilobites, will show more in a few days. Order.: PTYCHOPARIIDA Family.: LLANOASPIDIDAE Gen.: Genevievella, LOCHMAN, 1936 Rare trilobite with a large characteristic spine starting from the 7th axial ring. LINK: http://www.backtothepast.com.mx/ebonino/html/weeks_trilobites_1.html#Genevievella
  8. Trilobite Plate Fragment from MN Decorah?

    I found this chunk of shale poking around a bluff side a while back near Lilydale Park in Minneapolis, MN. The fragment pictured is translucent and is slightly concave, it reminds me of a cheek plate but Im not sure. I'm new at this so I'm pretty clueless, I appreciate any help.
  9. Tiny cephalon ID

    I was going through some rocks I found last year and came across this tiny cephalon I never noticed before. I believe this is Ft Atkinson formation , Ordovician. Cephalon measures only 1mm and is covered in tubercles. I'm wondering because of size would this be considered protaspid? Any help with ID appreciated.
  10. Since last year, I was starting hunting down all types of Bristolia genus. I am so fascinating about its shape. Here represents all the species I have acquired: Bristolia bristolensis (Resser 1928) Types: USNM 78390, the lectotype (defined in Palmer and Repina 1993); paralectotypes USNM 78391 and 78392. Bristolia bristolensis had originally been recognized (e.g., Riccio 1952; Palmer and Halley 1979; Palmer and Repina 1993) as a highly variable species, particularly in the condition of the intergenal and genal spine angles. However, Lieberman (1998) used univariate measurements and statistical analyses to define a well-constrained B. bristolensis based on Resser’s (1928) lectotype, and demonstrated that what had traditionally been treated as a broadly variable B. bristolensis was actually two different species. The species referred to as Bristolia n. sp. in Lieberman (1998) is described here as B. harringtoni n. sp. Bristolia bristolensis has the intergenal angle deflected at an 80 to 95 degree angle relative to a transverse line and the genal spine angle is variably developed opposite and/or between the distal tips of S2 and S3. In B. harringtoni the intergenal angle is deflected at a 50 to 65 degree angle relative to a transverse line and the genal spine angle is developed variably opposite the distal tip of S2 or the medial part of L1. Occurrence: California: the Carrara Formation, in the lower Bristolia zonule, upper part of the Olenellus zone, Early Cambrian, following Nelson (1976) and Palmer and Halley (1979), in the Grapevine, Funeral and Resting Spring ranges, the White-Inyo/Death Valley region, and in the Latham Shale, Marble Mountains, 190 m W of the limestone quarry, 0.5 mi E of Cadiz, in the Mojave Desert portion of San Bernardino County, possibly equivalent to Hazzard’s (1933) locality M-5, treated as in the Bristolia zonule. The above content comes from paper: Systematic Revision of the Olenelloidea (Trilobita, Cambrian) Bulletin 5 of the Peabody Museum of Natural History Yale University 18 October 1999 New Haven, Connecticut Bristolia Insolens (Resser, 1928) Bristolia cf. parryi
  11. Help with Moroccan Trilobites

    I'm looking for a little advice on a nice group of trilobites I purchased recently. I have no information on them, aside from that they came from Morocco, however after a bit of research I'm wondering if they're Hamatolenus from the Jbel Wawrmast Formation. With that said I don't know a whole lot about Moroccan trilobites and I have some questions as to their authenticity. I'm almost 100% sure these are real, but after studying them closely a few things bother me. For one, the smallest trilobite at the bottom has a hole beneath it - I can't really tell if it's been reattached or not. The surrounding rock also features a few tiny holes which I found suspicious (I'll add further pictures shortly). The whole piece also has a clay-like smell. With that said the edges of the plate are clean cut and seem to show natural rock layers, which I wouldn't imagine you'd see with a fake. Overall I can't imagine how something like this would be faked (and I wouldn't imagine it'd be worth the effort for the price I paid). But any input would be greatly appreciated as I know lots you are far more knowledgeable about Moroccan trilobites than myself!
  12. Fossil ID

    Hello, on a recent vacation to Las Vegas we had the opportunity to hike Frenchman Mountain, a popular trilobite quarry just east of LV. While there, I happened upon a couple interesting pieces. On the left is a possible imprint(?) And the piece on the right feels like a piece of coral, though I have a hard time believing the calcium carbonate structure would not have completely eroded away. Do I have anything here? Thanks for your time. A little more information, the paw prints are each 1.3 cm deep and the elongated fragment is also 1.3 cm deep.
  13. Agnostid or larva?

    Hello again, still going back through my neglected trilobites. This one I had labeled in my mind as Elrathia+ Agnostid fragment. After learning a little more about trilobite ontogeny (https://www.trilobites.info/ontogeny.htm) I wonder if the partial agnostid may rather be a larva of Elrathia? Or can I rule that out by size? I hope the "adult" is sufficient for scale comparison. The more you learn the less you know. Best Regards, J
  14. I believe this specimen was collected in the Fezouata Deposit. I am hoping someone on the forum might know what species it might be.
  15. Hello dear fellow forum members, I have to admit that until recently, the fascinating diversity of Trilobites escaped my closer attention. Now, triggered by @Kane s beautiful drawings and @rews Trilobite of the week I decided to take a closer look at some of what I had in my showcase for many years simply as "trilobite", my (everchanging) focus being more on vertebrates. By looking at a lot of pictures I decided the two rolled up specimens below should be Phacops to the left and Hollardops ("Metacanthina") to the right. Then I found a pic of Gerastos, which to my untrained Eye resembled Phacops quite a bit. And then I learned that Gerastos is not even a Phacopid, but a Proetid. So here is my Question: How do I find out what order of Trilobite I am looking at before searching for finer cladistic resolution? Or is that not a helpfull approach due to high diversity inside the orders, maybe convergent features...? I searched the Forum but didn´t find a basic Trilobite guide, if there is one I´d gladly follow a link. Thanks in advance, J
  16. What is the difference between Reedops cephalotes and Reedops maurulus?Looks the same to me.
  17. Fossil ID Help

    Hey everyone, I received some more fossils from my friend and I was wondering if anybody could help me ID them. The man who originally obtained them passed away years ago and these were apart of his collection. Thanks, Sidney Huskey
  18. Unknown trilobite

    I don't know what species this trilobite is. I would love to know what you guys think. Will post more if needed.
  19. My great aunt gave this to me years ago, and I would like to know if it is real. I know there are tons of fakes, and would like to see if mine is real.
  20. Greetings kind people, I am a complete novice in the field of fossil collecting. Kindly bear with me. My objective for collecting fossils: I want to learn paleontology work. I want to observe the fossils under a microscope, understand their body structure, their food habits.... Basically get a *whole story of the fossil* which I own, something that paleontologists do (I also want to explore all the methods that paleontologists use to study fossil and recreate them at home). So any fossil that will enable me to learn more about itself, I'd surely buy that. And also fossils which are more closer to actuality, rather than rare or good looking fossils. So any fossil that reveals more information is favoured over rare or good-looking fossils So here are my questions: 1) I'm trying to buy a spinosaur tooth. The seller is selling one spinosaur tooth which is red in colour for a higher price compared to a spinosaur tooth which looks almost like a rock. So is the red colour tooth more authentic or more valuable etc? Or is it just the same? My objective is to study those fossils under microscope. So if the red spinosaur tooth will provide more information, I'd buy that. 2) I see some dinosaur tooth still having some enamel. How is this possible? I mean shouldn't enamel be replaced by minerals too? Or is the enamel the only thing that is intact? If it is intact does it mean I'm holding a tooth which might have bit another dinosaur moments before it died and I can see the traces of that activity when I observe under the microscope? 3) I've seen polished ammonites which were split open. They carried a lot of information within, compared to unpolished ammonite. Which among those two types would reveal more information about the ammonite itself? Or which one should I go for, in general? 4)I am also planning to buy amber fossils. Some pointers and what to look for and what to keep away from would be appreciated. 5) Lastly, trilobites. How are trilobite fossils so well preserved? I've seen reedops protruding out of the rock like it's actually alive. But I read something about cast fossils and enhancements. So if I buy a reedops trilobite, does it mean it's been remade using plaster etc, or is it just as it is? Please bear in mind that I want to own fossils which closely resembles actuality Thank you so much for bearing with my silly doubts .I just want to educate myself and be an amateur paleontologist, studying fossils from home. Have a lovely day! P.s- I can upload some pictures and website links if need be.
  21. This Cambropallas trilobite looks pretty good to me, but curious if anyone sees any restoration I may be missing. Is this all natural? Thanks!
  22. Possible Devonian trace fossil?

    Hi, newer member and fossil newbie, went on one of my first fossil hunting trips recently at a locality I learned about in part from this forum, so thanks. Found a piece of stone with (what I'm 90% sure is) most of a trilobite on the left, but the stone also had a rounded streak through the middle. Does anyone know if this some form of trace fossil, or just awkward shaping of the stone? The piece is from the middle Devonian and Needmore formation of West Virginia, and the streak is roughly four centimeters long.
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