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Found 17 results

  1. Skull Found on Atlantic Shoreline

    Can anyone identify this what type of marine life this skull is part of? I found it today along the East Coast of United States - Atlantic Ocean Spoon in photo for scale. The strange up raised markings on top are perplexing. Type of Eel perhaps? It's wet from me rinsing it in sink. Thank you!
  2. Potential theropod tooth

    So I was walking in the river near my house one day and found what me and my friend think is a jeuvinile theropod tooth. Me and my friend are good with identifying dinosaurs, we love dinosaurs, but I just want to be sure. It's about 5 1/2 centimeters long, maybe 1/2 centimeter tall, and at the base about 1 centimeters thick. I found it in the Arkansas river right below keystone dam in Oklahoma, United States. It got dropped and broke into three pieces and that is why there are cracks in it.
  3. estate Sale - Hell Creek Theropod

    First post, but frequent follower of the page. I just came across a toe bone from an estate sale. It looks Hell Creek by the bone material and by what else was in the collection. It is definitely theropod. Would any of you be able to ID this? Any insight would be helpful. Thanks! Sean
  4. Found this weekend

    Found this weekend in my Dad's back yard in Tucumcari, New Mexico. This is the only piece i could find. Yet to find any info on this thing and never seen anything quite like it before.
  5. This was found on the Jersey Shore - a beach on the western Atlantic. I unfortunately don't have a scale, but it measures 3 inches x 4 inches (7.6 cm x 10.2 cm). Any idea what it is?
  6. Hey! I have kind of an odd question. I am purchasing a fossil for a friend as a birthday gift -- between a tip of a mammoth tusk, or a section of mosasaur jaw with teeth. What makes this unique, however, is that we are traveling to the British Virgin Islands (from the United States) for said birthday and I would like to be able to gift the fossil on the birthday instead of waiting until she returns home as we live in different states and I would only be able to ship it to her house and not be there. I am concerned, however, about bringing the fossils with me on the trip as I have heard nightmares about customs causing long hold ups or seizing fossils. Does anyone have any advice on this? Thanks!
  7. Cracked Pterodactyl Egg With Embryos Complete And Visible? At our favorite auction site, a seller is offering in several ads, these beautiful boulders that are no more than mere geological occurrences, which anyone can find on the edge of any river, as if they were genuine Pterosaur eggs ... But the Freak Circus does not end here, there's more! He announces as if these "eggs" had visible Pterosaur embryos. Can anyone see? But if you're a picky fossil collector who does not like rickety and scrawny creatures like the Pterosaurs ... His problems are over, because now he also sells boulders as if they were dinosaur eggs: How does he know what a Pterosaur egg is and what is a Dinosaur egg? Anyone have any explanation? A genuine egg of the Pterosaur is very, very rare, and is extremely different from these boulders that are widely being offered! That is, genuine Pterosaur eggs have shells, consisting essentially of an outer layer of thin and hard limestone, while under the shell was a softer membrane: And thanks to these meager but true discoveries is that we now know that pterosaur eggs were malleable, similar to the snake eggs of today: Unfortunately I can not reveal prices here, but believe me, these fake eggs do not cost anything cheap! So the high price is a great seducer, a real temptation for a novice and inexperienced collector, to think that high price means rarity, therefore, authenticity! The advice is the same as always, study on the subject so that the light of knowledge can dispel the darkness of ignorance.
  8. Fossil identification

    I found this as a child on one of the many adventures our family had across the United States, but do not know exactly where I found it.
  9. Is this a tiny baby bird fossil

    I have no idea what this really is. I found it when I was digging a new flower bed in my garden. It is from the east coast of the united states off of the coast of Delaware near the Atlantic ocean (I live less than a mile to the ocean). It looks like something to me, but are my eyes playing tricks on me? I can take more pictures. The rock sparkles, making some of the pictures hard to see, I picked the best I could.
  10. Tooth or Concretion

    Information: Squares in the background are 1/2 CM. (object is roughly 2.25X1.25X0.5 CM) (length-width-thickness) Unfortunately I don't think location information will be much use here but: Found in western Montana (United States)(near Great Falls) in a graveled driveway. No idea where it might be from, or if it was already here before the driveway. I'd be more than happy to provide more pictures/angles if it'll help. My little auto-adjusting light was being extremely temperamental with these pictures for some reason.. they are a fair bit darker than the object actually appears in-hand. The inner "tooth" is nearly pure black. I thought when I first picked it up that it was a tooth of some sort.. but the more I look at it, the more I'm thinking some sort of concretion. I don't claim to have any experience whatsoever with fossils, so I could easily be wildly wrong. Any of you more experienced folks recognize it? As a side note, if it does turn out something other than a normal rock, would I want to try to remove it from the other material? Any recommendations on doing so safely?
  11. Coprolite? Lobster? Big Brook NJ find

    Hello all, I found this last summer while at Big Brook in NJ. A guy I bumped into there said it was a coprolite, but I want to be certain. Any help would be appreciated greatly.
  12. Brachiopod identification needed.

    Looking to for an identification of this brachiopod. I bought it from a collector selling his collection 35 years ago. Unfornately I can't narrow the location more than the southwestern United States. Time period: Phanerozic, probably Paleozoic.
  13. Patriaspirifer duodenaris (Hall 1843)

    Found as surface float on the scree pile at the Kashong exposure. Originally assigned to Delthyris, reassigned to Spirifer, Acrospirifer, and Patriaspirifer. Alternate spellings: P. duodenaris, P. duodenaria, P. duodenarius. Does not appear in Fossilworks or Wilson’s “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York”. Classification information from Fossilworks entry for Patriaspirifer genus. Reference: Linsley, D. M. Devonian Paleontology of New York. (1994) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 21. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Fossilworks. http://fossilworks.org Yale Peabody Museum Collections website (http://peabody.yale.edu/collections/invertebrate-paleontology)
  14. A quick survey

    Hello, everyone. I'm working on a side project right now and I could use the input of the room for this one. I'm wondering what people consider to be the best fossil collecting sites public and private in the contiguous 48 states. I'm looking for everything. Vertebrates and invertebrates, all periods, just the cream of the crop for everything. I don't need exact locations, so don't worry about sharing super-secret specifics. Thank you in advance everyone!
  15. some kinda critter

    what u guys think that is and the amber looking thing
  16. The United States Geological Survey Tenth Annual Report (1889), Part 1- Geology page 511 to page 763, also includes 20 fossil plates, one folded USA map with Lower Cambrian exposures (large scale but gets you started). Invertebrates found and trilobites. The text describes the characteristics to identify Lower Cambrian invertebrates (1889 terminology, so some may be corrected after this was published). The map of the USA shows outcrops known from New England to Nevada, along the Appalachians and heavily covered for Wisconsin and some Minnesota. Those living in the Wisconsin and Minnesota area must have outcrops in their basements! This is a reference to get you started to narrow down exposures that you might have access. I had a neighbor who stopped at a fast food restaurant in Wisconsin and showed me a slab with something on it... an Olenellus trilobite! He could not remember which town, but if he could find one... you will find them. Fauna of the Lower Cambrian or Olenellus Zone is the title by Charles D. Walcott. This is just one part of a volume. Find a copy at your library and make some notes and photocopy the map of the USA. Follow the text for areas you may be familiar. These Lower Cambrian trilobites are very interesting to look at and can provide many hours of walking outcrops. I add two plates, upside down due to scanner options, and take a good look at just some of the possibilities!
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