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Found 356 results

  1. I love a good vertebra. I have a hard time ID'ing some of the ones I find, but I love them nonetheless. It occurred to me that I have a lot of vertebrae laying around. From tiny critters like baby turtles and snakes, to big critters like whales. I was going through my boxes today, looking for something unrelated, and I kept running across vertebrae. So, tomorrow when the lighting is better (it's dark here now and I'm tired), I am going to lay out all of the vertebrae I have found over the years and take a group photo. Before I share my verts, let's see what you have! Show us your favorite verts! I'll post mine tomorrow.
  2. Found Large Mammal Vertibrae

    More overburden mammal fossils, these two are some of the better mammal vertebrae I've found. Any guesses? I've had a hard time trying to pin point it based solely on their shape. Ill post the fish vertebrae next. s, these two are some of the better mammal vertebrae I've found. Ill post the fish vertebrae next.
  3. Miocene Vertebrae? ID

    Collected #’s 1-3 at Brownies Beach, Maryland: Miocene, Calvert Formation and #4 in Matoaka, slightly younger formation (I believe). After trying to identify them, I think they are: 1: some type of bony fish, 2: Basking shark (I didn’t think it was a vertebrae until I saw this picture)- https://www.calvertmarinemuseum.com/334/Vertebrate-Fossils , 3: shark, 4: I am making a wild guess at a small crocodile. I am probably way off as this is my first shot at identifying these, so I thank you in advance for your insight.
  4. Is This A Whale Vertebra?

    This piece was found in a pleistocene deposit off the New Jersey coast and was labeled as Whale, hard to find any comparisons so I am unsure this is the case though its likely, any help on this will be appreciated. measures 3 x3 x 2 1/2 in
  5. Possible Vertebrae

    Good afternoon, I found this item, that I assume is a vertebra, Lang the Neuse River in Craven County, NC. The shape is unusual and I was wondering if someone can tell me more about the bone. 1.25 inches wide 3.75 inches long and 1.75 inches tall. Thank you very much!
  6. I've been looking for hesperornis fossils for a while, and recently, an acquaintance presented me with a challenge: He would send me a bag of broken up hesperornis verts for me to assemble. In return, I had to send him the biggest and best vert back. He also warned me it could be a real headache. I took the challenge. Lo and behold! I was presented with over 60 broken pieces, some of which were tiny and terribly fragmented (not shown in picture) Nonetheless, I googled for pictures of hesperornis verts and put what limited knowledge I had on fossil assembly into this task. After 18 hours, this is what I got: All in all, it was a tiring but satisfying job and now I can happily say I am the proud owner of a chain of associated hesperornis verts
  7. Probably not an old bone!

    Hi 1st time poster so please go easy on me. I’m almost certain this will be a modern bone but if anybody can tell from the photos I’d be interested to find out. I picked this up off a beach in North Wales, UK where there is a petrified forest and peat beds where clove hoof prints have been found. It was not submerged at all. The tape measure shows cm & inches. I’m sure it will just be a cow or sheep but you never know... Thanks in advance Steve
  8. Hi I just bought these two dinosaur fossils from Alberta Canada. A Ceratopsian vert and a Hadrosaur metatarsal. The colouring and look/preservation of the Hadrosaur metatarsal makes me think they didn’t come from the Horseshoe canyon formation like it says but instead the Dinosaur Park formation. since it doesn’t give much information other then the Horseshoe canyon formation it’s possible, Thanks for future help. Ceratopsian vert
  9. Bones?

    Does anyone know what species these bones belong to? All were found on Sanibel Island but at different times.
  10. dinosaurs down under:Theropoda

    LINK about 4,5 MB New megaraptorid (Dinosauria: Theropoda)remains from the Lower Cretaceous Eumeralla Formation of Cape Otway, Victoria, Australia Stephen F. Poropat, Matt A. White, Patricia Vickers-Rich & Thomas H. Rich Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 39:4, e1666273, Tetanurae sensu Gauthier: "includes birds and all other theropods that are closer to birds than they are to Ceratosauria"
  11. NSR Jackpot(ish)

    I finally convinced myself to head out to the North Sulphur River again. After 2 attempts of coming up empty handed I was having trouble convincing myself that it was worth the 4 hour round trip excursion. Knowing the date for damming up the river looms nearer and nearer I decided to brave the cold water. I'm glad I did. This time with some help and guidance from a friend my trip was much more eventful. Having NEVER found a Mosasaur vertebrae my trip was made just 10 minutes in when a beautiful Mosasaur vertebrae was just sitting right there on the surface. Already a massive success in my book. A little ways down the creek my friend begins to tell me how he has found 2 Mosasaur premaxes in this spot throughout the year. I replied, "Dude, I would lose my mind if I found a piece of Mosasaur jaw!" No joke, less than 1 minute later we turn a corner and I notice something barely sticking out of the shale and mud at the bottom of the creek. I pick it up, turn it over and staring back at me is a tooth socket! Needless to say, true to my word, I did indeed lose my mind! Apparently my excitement and loud noises I made scared off all the other fossils as I didn't find much else for the next several hours. Still this was by far my best and most exciting fossil hunt. Totally worth getting stuck and sucked up into knee deep mud for.
  12. Mystery find

    Hello everyone. Please help me identify this beautiful piece of history before my dog gets hold of it and buries it in my back yard.....100,000 years from now some future archaeologist will be like “ very interesting - quite obviously a dinosaur fossil but very strange how it lies next to a chicken bone a tennis ball and a plastic object with the word Chukkit stamped on it....must have been some sort of early human ritual.” This fossil measures 6 X 6 inches wide by 4 inches deep. Any information on this would be greatly appreciated - I’m a newbie here. When I purchased this it did not come with any label or info on its origin so unfortunately no context. Thank you very much - Stu
  13. cretaceous,USA,Pisces

    A new large Late Cretaceous lamniform shark from North America, with comments on the taxonomy, paleoecology, and evolution of the genus Cretodus Kenshu Shimada &Michael J. Everhart Article: e1673399 | Received 30 Nov 2018, Accepted 09 Sep 2019, Published online: 18 Nov 2019 LINK (description of Cretodus houghtonorum n.sp) edit:5,30 MB,or thereabouts relevant: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Containing Papers of a Biological Character Vol. 210 (1921), pp. 311-407 V I I I .— On the Calcification o f the Vertebral Centra in Sharks and Rays. B y W . G. R id e w o o d, D.Sc. 18 MB!!
  14. Hello everybody I got this a few weeks ago, but didn't had time to post it. It's from the Munich Fossil Show from an Moroccan dealer. This one was sold as associated Mosasaur Verts from Morocco. No more info on location. But the dealer was Moroccan and had lots of other stuff from Morocco. Since it was on a fossilshow I didn't had time to post pictures here, but for me this looked good enough to get it. What are your thoughts on this one? I still couldn't finde any obvious fabrications. It looks good for me. More pictures can be provided if needed. And I got tow more questions: Is there any better ID possible than just Mosasaur Verts? Should I prep it some more? Removing more Matrix, or the plaster from the back? I would just leave it as it is as I'm not sure if it falls apart if I remove the plaster. Length is about 45 cm (17.7 inches) Thank you for any help!
  15. Champosaur or dinosaur tail?

    Hi. I'm new here. This is being given to me. I haven't seen it, myself, yet, but the person sent me this photo. She said her dad got it from a collector almost 50 years ago in Texas, who said he got it from a local farmer. They called it a dinosaur tail. My very short internet research found possibly Champosaur? Hadrosaur seems less likely. When I get it, I can take more detailed photos to post. Opinions?
  16. Purse Park, MD

    A few hours relaxing and finding teeth.
  17. Random beach fossil

    I found this "fossil" on the beach when I was a kid. Any idea what this is?
  18. Hello! This one looks suspect to me. The smoothness of the bones and the lack of closeup photos to see any air bubbles/casting artifacts makes it hard to discern here. I'm also going to call out the little crevice surrounding the fossil that separates it from the matrix, which to me suggests it was planted into the surrounding rock. Info: Ichthyosaur communis Llavernock beach, South Whales, UK
  19. Iguanodon Cervical Vertebrae

    Here’s a nice iguanodon cervical vertebrae. It’s from the Isle of Wight and is about 4.5 inches long.
  20. Dinosaur Vertebrae

    Hi im in the middle of prepping this dinosaur vertebrae and I’d appreciate help with ID. Its from the early Cretaceous of the Isle of Wight. The neural spine is with the vertebrae but has become broken and lies underneath the vertebrae as well Thanks Nick
  21. I was kayaking and fossiling this weekend with my sister and her husband in the Peace River in Gardner, Fl. and she found a vert and I am having a hard time trying to figure out what it belongs too. At first I thought it was whale but it's too small and as for a gator the shape looks different so any help would be appreciated :-)
  22. Vertebrae ID please

    Could you tell me what this vertebrae belonged to? It will not let me upload more photos. Thank you
  23. Florida Heart Shaped Fossil and other fossils

    I got a few fossils that I needed help identifying. One is a strange heart shape and appears to be bone. There's also a vertebrae and didn't know if it was a fish or shark vertebrae. I'm assuming shark due to its size. Finally, there is a bone that looks like a spur or piece of armor plating that I was trying to ID. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  24. Fish scale, vertebrae, squilla scale, some kind of plants Location: Pohang, south Korea Formation: Duho formation Age: middle miocene
  25. Hello! Need help. This unusual vertebra was found on the Oka River in the Moscow region. Related findings - mammoth fauna and other animals; up to 12 ... 15 million years. Fossilization is uneven. In my opinion, the age of the animal is from 30 to 150 thousand years. The vertebra is like a horse; smaller, but the canal of the spinal cord and the lateral canals of the same size are large. Cranial bulge (bump-hinge) - triple; the two protrusions may have been functional. There is a hole - shown by red arrows. Part of the vertebra is destroyed due to the hit, in my opinion, of the spear of an ancient hunter - the “stone tip” stuck in the bones and partially in one of the small lateral canals. I still have poor understanding of the vertebrae. My interests are the Stone Age, human activities. I suppose it's a cervical vertebra; relatively long. Perhaps these are ancient horses or giraffes. The functionality of these two protrusions is incomprehensible; what are they for?
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