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Found 10 results

  1. Bone

    I found this rock in the satsop river Washington state. I am a newbie in the fossil world. I would love any information you may have.
  2. A fossil named after Burke Museum curator tells whale of a tale about evolution By Alan Boyle, GreekWire, November 30, 2018 https://www.geekwire.com/2018/fossil-named-burke-museum-curator-tells-whale-tale-evolution/ Ancient whale named for UW paleontologist Elizabeth Nesbitt Hannah Hickey, University of Washington News https://www.washington.edu/news/2018/12/10/ancient-whale-named-for-uw-paleontologist-elizabeth-nesbitt/ Newly-Described Fossil Whale Named After Burke Curator Burke Museum Public Relation http://www.burkemuseum.org/press/newly-described-fossil-whale-named-after-burke-curator The paper is: Peredo, C.M., Pyenson, N.D., Marshall, C.D. and Uhen, M.D., 2018. Tooth Loss Precedes the Origin of Baleen in Whales. Current Biology. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982218314143 Happy New Year, Paul H.
  3. What is this?

    I found this walking on an ocean beach in Northern Washington State near the Strait and not sure what it is. It is about 3 in long and 2 in diameter. It is hollow inside. Thanks in advance for any help.
  4. Coprolite Cololite

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/47445767@N05/sets/72157648052271340 Click on "show more" below heading for interesting explanation.
  5. Aturia_Angustata in the sunshine

    From the album Cephalopods

    Aturia Augustata is an Eocene Nautiloid from Lincoln Creek Formation, Grays Harbor County, WA, USA . Sutures (or suture lines) are visible as a series of narrow wavy lines on the surface of the shell, and they appear where each septum contacts the wall of the outer shell. The sutures of the nautiloids are simple in shape, being either straight or slightly curved. This is different from the "zigzag" sutures of the goniatites and the highly complex sutures of the ammonites.
  6. Fossil with "blood"?

    I found this fossil bone a month ago in the Okanogan River area in Eastern Washington State. I have other photo's, but even following the editing to reduce size of the files it would only let me upload one. I live in Barrow Alaska and a local geologist took a look at it and stated it is a fossil, and he felt that is a blood layer. Due to the geologic history of the area, perhaps this bone was transported by the floods from Montana. This was sitting in the mud and I noticed it thinking at first that it had paint on it, but it is a layer on the "top" of the bone. Unfortunately I am back in Barrow and cannot so search for more where I found this. I would appreciate any help any of you can give me, Thanks!!
  7. Bones-Possible Pterosaur

    I have finally found the courage to display just 3 of the fossils that I have...as I am just a "baby" in terms of even the novice hobbyists. I cannot guarantee that they are all completely clear of matrix material. I am concerned that my as of yet limited knowledge, could/would likely negatively affect the "Arrested Beauty" that has been set before us; as a "annal" before before written language. These fossils were found at home, in my backyard near Maple Valley in King County Washington. As I have said before, I am new at this, but as far as I can tell from the limited information I have found in my search for clues, the area where I live has formations from the Mesozoic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. My best educated guess (if you can call mine educated), is that at least number 1 and 2 (from left to right) are foot/hand bones from a Pterosaur. I am fairly confidant that #3 is one end of a femur. Unsure of the animal given that to me, they all look so very similar. I am absolutely not confident enough to make a guess as to the specific species. I am skeptical of my general assessment, given that I have found no evidence that any other fossils of the like have been found in the area; immediate or otherwise. I have also found what I believe to be small diameter pieces of fossilized ivory/tusk here. With that being said, please be gentle. I keep talking myself out of even posting these out of fear of making yet another fool of myself (only in a different way). I defer to my much much more experienced peers. Please do let me know if any other angles, etc. are needed for identification.
  8. Found in western Washington state. Note the premaxillary tooth or tusk structure. Any identification help is appreciated. Thanks.
  9. Any thoughts on this piece my boyfriend found today at Port Williams beach in Sequim, WA? It was in the bluff half exposed after a fresh slide. No scale to weigh it here...but it's pretty heavy probably 4-5 pounds.pp More photos in following post. Thank you!!
  10. Angiosperm I.d.

    Hello all, Last weekend I took a trip to a ligniferous deposit of the Lutetian Tiger Mountain Formation (Puget Group) near Issaquah, WA to collect retinite. Today, I finally got to searching through for inclusions with my microscope and I found this small flower. The piece of retinite which it was found in is ~1.6x0.5x0.5 cm, and the magnification in the image is 40X. If anyone has a hypothesis about the phylogenetic placement of the angiosperm that the flower belongs to, please post a reply below.
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