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Found 80 results

  1. Belated 2019 Road Trip Fossils

    Last year, to celebrate finishing my undergraduate degree, my girlfriend and I went on a long (9,000+ mile) road trip around the western US and at long last (a little over a year since their discovery) the last of the fossils we found are out of the refrigerator and I’ve finally gotten all of them photographed. Here are some of the highlights and best fossils we found. A rough map of the route of the trip While the trip wasn’t entirely fossil centric we wanted to hunt at a few cool spots along the way. We chose to visit 5 fossil locations, the first of which was Clarkia Fossil Bowl in Idaho, a fantastic location for Miocene age leaves (Langhian Stage, ~15Mya) tucked behind a motocross track. These poor fossils have been through it all in the year between when they were found and when I finally got them dry. They’ve been soaked several times, gone mouldy twice, frozen at least once and flown across the Atlantic Ocean, all before spending the last 8 months in the refrigerator. Amazingly all but two of them survived perfectly including one of my favourite finds, a tiny flower. A maple leaf (genus Acer) still partly covered in matrix but with the stem intact. At some point I hope to get this one prepared. The best leaf find of the trip, with beautiful red coloration and mottling from fungus. A partial leaf, with beautiful vein preservation. The next spot was the American Fossil quarry in Kemmerer Wyoming to look for Eocene fish (Green River Formation, Ypresian Stage, ~53-48Mya). Splitting though the material left out by the quarry we found a few fish, primarily Knightia and Diplomystus. The best Knightia, including the best fish of the day with its head still partly covered. Some of the Diplomystus. The first needs some repair as it broke through the tail. The second has a counterpart as well and I’m hoping to frame it soon. And a mystery fish, I don’t know what species this is, it could just be Knightia or Diplomystus but it doesn’t look like the others we found. The star find came close to the end of the time at the quarry, a section of a puddle layer packed full of Knightia, at least a dozen fish piled on top of each other. The quarry manager was kind enough to let me take the blocks without splitting them thinner since the material is full of fractures and likely would not have survived. The layer as it split in the quarry (US size 13 hiking boot acting as a rough scale). The three pieces I managed to recover. The blocks are currently in a storage unit in Washington until I can figure out how to get them prepared. I am hoping the first two pieces can be reunited and the part and counterpart can be mounted side by side but I’m unsure about how to accomplish this. If anyone who prepares Green River fish has any ideas please let me know. The third locality we visited was Westgard pass in Inyo California, hunting for Cambrian archaeocyathids (Poleta Formation, Cambrian Stage 3, ~ 520Mya). We were only there a short time as there was a lot of driving to do that day, but I still managed to find one example in cross section. My girlfriend was more lucky, finding four examples. These are our favourites, particularly the third, which exhibits some dimensionality in addition to the cross-section. I’m absolutely thrilled to find anything Cambrian, and to make things even better the fossil locality is just down the road from the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, home to living trees more than 4,000 years old and one of my favourite spots on the whole trip. We also visited Capitola Beach to search for rolled cetacean bone. I found two examples with one clearly showing the cancellous internal bone texture. To cap off the trip I wanted to do a fossil hunt in my home state of Washington. Since I still don’t know where to go to look for the elusive Pulalius crab, we decided to search the West Twin River site for shrimp concretions (Pysht Fomration, Oligocene, ~22-33Mya). We found over a dozen of these containing partial shrimp. I think they are all Callianopsis clallamensis since this is a common species at this locality. The first concretion that I found after identifying the right material. Another shrimp nodule containing a large section of claw. The head of a shrimp. Two non-crustaceans, a gastropod internal mould and a beautiful white bivalve in a small concretion. A mystery concretion with something eroding out from both ends. And last, one of the strangest concretions I have ever seen. The outside is hardened but the inside is a soft clay consistency with several bits of shrimp shell, completely the opposite of the hard in the middle concretions I’m used to. In all, it was a fantastic trip. I would love to go back to all the sites we visited, and there is so much more to explore next time I’m stateside. I’m looking forward to getting out hunting again. Stay tuned for the next big trip to celebrate finishing our masters. Benton
  2. Help ID this for my 7 year old?

    Hi everyone! My son found this at the Gardiner boat ramp beach (a very rocky beach) near Sequim, Washington on the Olympic Peninsula. From a quick google search he thinks it might be horn coral. What do you think? And can he sell it for $799.99 and earn enough money to buy the LEGO UCS Millennium Falcon? Whole rock is about 70mm across. Please let me know if you have any other questions that would help you hazard a guess. Thank you so much! Beth Stucky
  3. I found this specimen in a gravel bed on the bank of the Nooksack River a few miles east of Glacier, Wa. The rock is dark gray, river smoothed, and dense. I have very little experience in this field and was hoping someone might be able to shed some light on what this might be. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  4. Agatized Aturia Angustata

    Heavily weathered nautiloid, Aturia, from the lower Oligocene marine sediments of Washington state. Agatized. Some prep work, too fragile to expose further.
  5. Back In The Saddle

    Dear Friends! My apologies for staying away for many years. Things change, life evolves. Quick update: yes, I'm still alive, built a new house, nearly gave up on fossil hunts because of the restrictions. But! you can't keep someone's passion, especially fossil folks (we're stubborn like that) under lock and key forever. Met several new friends, started taking longer hikes deeper into the field, hills and canyons. Studied and researched the geology of my region and drank lots of coffee. With the help of some friends, I started understanding the history better. The results have been rewarding. I found a new fossil that's being described as we speak and when published, will share with you. Here's my latest find, unprepped, an isopod. Only took 32 years to find one! I will try to make more posts as new things come about. Fossil on!
  6. North Cascades Mollusk ID

    I recently found clam fossils in a river bed in the North Cascades (NW side of Kittitas County) that I'd love to identify. See attached image. Each fossil is approximately 3.5" long and 3" wide.
  7. I found this super useful resource lately and thought you guys would enjoy: https://geologyportal.dnr.wa.gov/ It's an interactive geologic map of Washington state, it records multiple fossil beds and formations as well as old quarries and mines. It may take a little bit of research if you're unfamiliar, but it's an invaluable resource if you're searching for a new spot. Remember to stay safe and avoid trespassing
  8. More Long Cylindrical Shells

    A little while back I made a trip to the Lincoln Creek formation in Centralia Washington and came back with some strange cylindrical shells. Some folks on the forum suggested that they might be ship worm burrows, but I found some more today on a follow-up expedition. I can now safely say that they are all fairly straight, and narrow down into a sharp point towards the end. I found a picture labeled as "Cenozoic Shells of Washington State" on the internet, and one of the shells in the picture seems to be a dead ringer for the things I've been finding. Unfortunately, none of the shells in the picture are labeled. Does anyone know what kind of mollusk they might be from? Edit: Might have just found it! Scaphopods?
  9. Fossil Flower

    Hello everyone, I was out looking for leaf fossils the other day, and found this flower. I actually found 2 but the other broke . I was in the Naches Formation of Central Washington. From what I've read it ranges from 35-40 MYO. Closest thing I can find for i.d. is Florissantia Quilchenensis. Anyone able to confirm or have an alternate i.d.? I appreciate your assistance. Chris
  10. Has Anyone Found the Cambrian

    Hello Everyone, As someone who grew up in Washington and goes back on occasion when university is out (still haven’t found a crab yet though, they’re elusive) I have a passionate interest in the fossils of my state. I have recently been going through the fossilspot.com list of find spots for Washington and noticed, much to my excitement, that there are some listings for the Cambrian. I didn’t realise we had any Cambrian, I thought it was all a little North and East of Washington. Has anyone ever gone out and tried to find these? I’d be really interested to see if these reports are valid since they are relatively patchy. I’ve tried to find where they are talking about on Google earth with a geologic map overlay. Benton
  11. possibly a fossil?

    Hi All, I found this on a beach in Puget Sound, Washington. Any chance it's some kind of fossil or is it just a strange rock? Thanks!
  12. Ice age tibia?

    I found this tibia(my girlfriend is an emergency vet and identified it as such, with a small amount of research I confirmed) half buried in the sand on a private beach adjacent to dash point in Washington on the shore of the southern end of Puget sound. My apologies I could not find a ruler with metric measurements. My main question is it seems small to be from a large mammal, but it does appear to be in great shape, so perhaps from a young animal. I’m I correct in assuming it’s an ice age mammal. I know there are tons of glacial deposits.
  13. Cephalopod ID request

    Good evening folks. I have a Cephalopod section that weighs about 5 pounds and is about 7 inches long without a name:-( It was collected from leftover bridge fill on the Oregon/Washington border. No other information was available. It's unusual (to me) in two ways, first the size and center crystallization and second it appears to have green/brown contents visible where a piece was broken off (right side of photo #1). Help....
  14. Fossils?

    found in antient waterfall that was exposed by a logging colvert that was shifted in a mud slide this last fall.
  15. Egg?

  16. I'll post more pictures but it will only allow one at a time
  17. Cololites? Cecum? Coprolite?

    Hello again. I have two fossils I've had labeled as coprolites and just found out they may be something else??? The smaller of the two (1st photos) is 20L x 7W x 15Hmm and was listed as "Turtle Poop" from Salmon Creek, Lewis County, Washington. The second set of photos was listed as "Dino poo from Washington" and is 45L x 20W x 28Hmm with no specific location specified. I'm thinking the 1st item very well may be Turtle Poo, but am unsure of the second item. Looks like it "could be" a Cecum or Cololite. Please let me know what you think. Thanks.
  18. Unknown leaf

    Found an unknown leaf fossil in the central Washington Swauk formation. About 3.5 inches tip to base, 2.5 inches wide.
  19. Was hoping to get General area of where you go I’m in Longview wa and driving up to the Olympic pennisula would have to be a weekend trip. (Plus if I’m wrong most of that area is a national park and illegal to collect there, but everyone just says go to the Olympic Peninsula or Washington coast) was hoping there was somewhere closer? i got onx maps and can see where public land is and also have a discover pass for washington. if you want to leave it private but feel like sharing a general area please feel free to private message me
  20. Siderite or Turtle Coprolite

    My sister purchased this from a rock/fossil shop in Oregon. She was told it is a turtle coprolite from Madagascar. Though I am a VERY amateur rock and fossil collector, I questioned whether it is a coprolite. It is very heavy for its size and non-magnetic. After doing some research, I have come to the conclusion that it is Siderite from Salmon Creek, Washington, USA. I am doing a Rock and Mineral Show and Tell for my sister-in-law's 5th grade science class and want to make sure my identification is correct. Would anyone like to weigh in on this? I would appreciate feedback. Thank you.
  21. First fossil dragonflies from B.C. identified and named Simon Fraser University, November 04, 2019 http://www.sfu.ca/sfunews/stories/2019/11/first-fossil-dragonflies-from-bc-identified-and-named.html Fifty-million-year-old dragonfly species that once flew in B.C. identified for first time. Identifying dragonflies from fossils involves mapping their distinctive wings and comparing the results to species living today. By Kevin Griffen, Vancouver Sun, November 4, 2019 https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/fifty-million-year-old-dragonfly-species-that-once-flew-in-b-c-identified-for-first-time The open access paper is: Archibald, S.B. and Cannings, R.A., 2019. Fossil dragonflies (Odonata: Anisoptera) from the early Eocene Okanagan Highlands, western North America. The Canadian Entomologist, pp.1-34. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/canadian-entomologist/article/fossil-dragonflies-odonata-anisoptera-from-the-early-eocene-okanagan-highlands-western-north-america/74A59170711807272E35236BA309AC9A Related paper is: Archibald, S.B., Greenwood, D.R., Smith, R.Y., Mathewes, R.W., and Basinger, J.F. 2011a. Great Canadian Lagerstätten 1. Early Eocene Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington State). Geoscience Canada, 38:155–164. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262485004_Great_Canadian_Lagerstatten_1_Early_Eocene_Lagerstatten_of_the_Okanagan_Highlands_British_Columbia_and_Washington_State Yours, Paul H.
  22. Possible bone?

    Hey everyone. Its been a while. Found this on the beach so I have no idea where its from. Looks pourous on the inside but totally rock. Not too heavy though. Found in Puget sound WA
  23. Shrimp?

    I’m not sure what I’m looking at is it a fossil? Is it a Deteriorated fossil. If it is a fossil, how should I proceed? Posting other pics in comments.
  24. Aturia prep

    so these buggers are about as rare as they come since you can get them any more decided to go and prep one for you to see.
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