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Found 54 results

  1. It happens every year. My birthday. We decide to disappear into Northern Alberta along the banks of the Little Smoky and Smoky Rivers. The weather was not warm, but at least it was not snowing like it was during this same weekend in southern Alberta. Mornings started out about -4C and warmed to +6C by the time we were trudging home with our packs full of treasures. Baculites and Scaphites were our targetted fossils, although clams were not ignored. It never seems to get any easier. The first day on the Little Smoky was the easiest on our bodies, but the mud bog for about 500 yards going in was at test on the Rav4 we'd elected to use as our mode of transportation. The driver, not totally familiar with wilderness/oil lease roads made his own decision to push through so we just urged him on (by yelling "give 'er, give 'er, don't stop!") until we came out at the top of the hill. Coming back through it at the end of the day was better as it was more downhill and we (2 passengers) elected to walk along the road and dodge the mud slinging out from under the Rav4. Okay, Day 1 - check. Day 2 was a drop down into a gorge on the Smoky River, below a friend's cattle ranch. We hadn't been there for a couple years and the dead fall and thorns were a wonderful treat to awaken our senses. A few scaphites depressus were found and a couple baculite stacks. Oh, and a wonderful negative that I photographed and another I brought back. There was also a river otter that wasn't too happy with me being in his area. The climb back up the gorge to the ranch was not any easier despite having placed surveyor flagging on a few trees. Day 2 - check. Day 3 brought us down to the Smoky River further downstream from the previous day. Lots of walking, lots of bear scat but very little evidence of fossils. We did find a few clams. We need a good slump to expose more of the fossil layer so won't head back to this area for a couple years.
  2. This report is a bit late, but better late than never! During late July through to mid August 2018 i was on a research trip to study a new Canadian dinosaur footprint site for my Masters degree project. I am based in Australia, and this was the first time i had been to Canada! So of course i had to make the most of it and pay a visit to the world renowned Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta, arguably the richest site in the world for dinosaur fossils. The park is the best exposure of the Dinosaur Park Formation (which it is now named after), which dates to about 76.5 million years ago during the mid-Campanian. I had long read about this location and watched it on documentaries for so many years growing up as a kid. Finally being there in person was very surreal! I was quite lucky and managed to go on a long, extended walk through the park with one of the guides for about 6 hours in total. In this relatively short amount of time i observed so many amazing fossils. I must have been completely desensitised within the first 30 minutes! It really is incredible how much fossil material there is lying all over the park. In Australia, whole scientific papers are written about isolated or fragmentary dinosaur bones, yet here they were just lying everywhere! The pictures really speak for themselves. As said, all of these fossils were observed in the field during a single days visit to the park. As this is a World Heritage site, nothing was taken, all finds were put straight back onto the ground after i took these photos. It's a VERY hard thing to do, but rules are rules. The only thing that was removed from the park on my trip was my best find of the day... a near-perfect 5.3 cm tyrannosaur tooth from Gorgosaurus!!!! This find was too special to leave behind, so the park tour guide GPS marked the location and brought it back for display, likely at the visitor centre or as a demonstration piece for their guided tours. To say that i have found a tyrannosaur tooth is a great honour! You may remember it from the July 2018 VFOTM poll. Without further ado, here are the pics! It is going to take multiple posts to fit them all in, so scroll all the way down to see them all! Various dinosaur vertebrae. Everything from hadrosaurs (duck billed dinosaurs) and ceratopsians (horned dinosaurs) to theropods (two legged meat eaters) and ankylosaurs (armoured dinosaurs). These were so common! I would probably pick a new one up every 5 minutes or so. Ankylosaur tooth
  3. Please help id and inform me

    Hello i went to the river today in central alberta and found these fossils i believe one is petrified wood but it also has a translucent mineral in it?? I think?? And orange mineral around it which i assume is sap amber??? the size of these rocks are around a baseball please help identify all of them and offer info ill greatly appreciate it first two pictures are of opposite sides same as the other two.
  4. Very odd tyrannosaur tooth?

    Hello Everyone, I have a very strange looking tooth from an area where I sometimes find tyrannosaurid teeth (daspletosaurus from the oldman formation I think). I have posted a lot of angles to try to capture it's oddness. Basically, the shiny side has a weird valley going down lengthwise, near the front carina. The weathered side has a shallow valley running lengthwise closer to the back carina. These features make the tooth appear to have a twist almost like a drill bit when you look at it from the tip down.
  5. Hi all, I just got this tooth from Tolman Bridge area of Alberta. That area falls within Edmonton Group supposedly. I believe it's a hadrosaur maxillary tooth. Any idea what kinda hadrosaur it could be? Thank you for your help.
  6. South Ram River Alberta scaphites

    Wonderful trip to the South Ram River in between camping and kayaking. While the rest of the group went to see Ram River Falls I elected to check my favourite spot for any scaphites that may have popped up since my last visit a couple years ago. Lucky day.
  7. I found this bone when I was vacationing at the milk river, AB. I found it on a cliff ledge, under about 9 feet of sand. It feels petrified compared to other fossils I have, and it looks like the toe bone of a theropod.
  8. Any ideas?

    Found at the Mountain Park Formation near Cadomin AB, unsure of age. Found amongst Metasequoia fragments. My first thought was some sort of seed cone, maybe bark?
  9. I recently moved to Calgary from Winnipeg and would like to go fossil hunting - but I don’t know where to go. I am familiar with Alberta’s regulations pertaining to surface collection. I know most people don’t like to give out the locations of their favorite fishing holes or fossil sites. Any guidance you can provide for locations would be appreciated.
  10. Is this a fossil ? Found in ravine

    Hi there, just wonder if this is a fossil I found it in Edmonton, Alberta in a ravine by a small little stream. Sorry for lack of information, quite new to fossil hunting, thank you for understanding and any response is appreciated.
  11. First dinosaur fossils of the season

    My first day out. Not sure what it all is but looks like tyrannosaur teeth, claws? Horn? Big toe bone and micro toe bone? Croc tooth, small vertibra? I would appreciate if anyone can help out on the ID. Next time I'm going to take a digital tour and post in situ.
  12. I hammered this free from a chunk of ironstone. Ironstone matrix. I thought it was completely round like a marble nut the more I inspected I see some traits that this is a designed specimen with a symmetrical pattern and some unique patterns. Any ideas?
  13. Alberta RCMP are on the hunt for a trio of dinosaur-toting thieves after a late-night break and enter at the Jurassic Forest Theme Park near Gibbons. http://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4542915?__twitter_impression=true
  14. Theropod teeth from Alberta??

    Hi guys, I recently made a trade with someone for some theropod teeth fragments from Alberta, I was just wondering if their was any chance of possibly nailing down what these teeth came from other then theropod. As always many thanks guys, GK
  15. Tyrannosaurid Tooth?

    Hi folks! Thought I might try leaning on the expertise of the forum gurus - I've owned this tooth for a few years and would like to hear any opinions of what the specimen should be classed as. It was sold as Daspletosaurus Torosus, but I'm aware of how hard it can be to label Tyrannosaur teeth (or just leave them as 'indet'). The tooth originated from Alberta, Canada. As it isn't the clearest to see, the denticles (which are very fine and equal in size on both sides) on the anterior edge curve off to the right (viewing the tooth face on), whilst the posterior serrated line is straight. PS: Apologies for the quality of photos too...my phone doesn't enjoy photographing anything magnified.
  16. Fossil?

    Hiya! Wentout today to look out for fossils for the first time. Stumbled upon what seems to look like some type of vertebra on a river bank? Not entirely sure if it's a fossil at all, since there were lots of deer bone fragments in the vicinity too. Looks to be a little older though?
  17. Claw fossil. Microraptor ?

    Hey, just curious if anyone might help out on this ID. Hysperonychus? Sourornitholestes?
  18. 3.75" tyrannosaurid tooth. Indet.?

    Fossil tyrannosaurid tooth found last weekend. 2nd largest one I have found and largest in the area by at least an inch. Formation is belly river group. I believe i is out of dinosaur park formation layers and possibly mix of oldman and foremost formations. I'm thinking gorgosaurus or daspletosaurus???
  19. What is this?

    So I have posted some of the amazing petrified bones I have found from a special excavation site. I do not know what dinosaur it is, but it is huge. These were found off of a riverbank, in Edmonton Alberta and I have hundreds from the same site. I believe one picture is of a horn? Maybe another is vertebrate from a back? Any input please. Here is 2 more
  20. I am new to this so excuse my lack of terminology. I am looking for help identifying what this is. I picked it up next to a excavation sight that I have pulled hundreds of bones from. I have also found many primitive stone tools in the same location. I found what appeared to be a primitive tool. Upon closer examination I have discovered the top half covered in a leather like impression. I am not certain that this is a tool, or a bone but I am under the assumption that this is a impression of skin on this object. Any information will be helpful. I will be posting pictures of the amazing bones I have collected in hopes of identifying what dinosaur I have. This was collected in the north Saskatchewan river, just off of the shore.
  21. Unknown tooth from Oldman formation

    Hi, I found this little gem in Southern Alberta. Any ideas about what creature it looks like it might belong to?
  22. Hi i was hoping someone could identify this tooth from near Medicine Hat AB. I found it along hadrosaur spitters and turtle carapace fragments. Lots of fossils in the area but this is unique.
  23. Another very successful trip to the Little Smoky River this year north of Valleyview, Alberta. River levels had finally receded and we were lucky to be one of the first to pick the banks for exposed baculites. They are mostly fragmented and I have yet to find a complete specimen. No matter the size their colours are brilliant from silvery white, blues, reds and greens. The shimmery colour catches your eye when they are wet and at the waters edge.
  24. Weird 'Rocks' at Robotics Test Site Turn Out to Be Dinosaur Fossils By Mindy Weisberger, Live Science, July 31, 2017 https://www.livescience.com/59986-rover-challenge-unearths-fossils.html Soil Survey of Midland Provincial Park and Interpretation for Recreational Use http://ags.aer.ca/publications/OFR_1984_37.html http://ags.aer.ca/document/OFR/OFR_1984_37.PDF Yours, Paul H.
  25. Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album Dinosaur teeth

    Tyrannosaur indet. Campanian (80 million years ago) Two Medicine Formation Drumheller, Alberta, Canada
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