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Found 21 results

  1. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/ammolite-mine-expansion-canada-gems-1.3993105 (although I don't know how I feel about processing lovely ammonites into other things )
  2. Exceptionally preserved Jurassic sea life found in new fossil site https://news.utexas.edu/2017/01/25/exceptionally-preserved-jurassic-sea-life-found https://phys.org/news/2017-01-exceptionally-jurassic-sea-life-fossil.html http://www.heritagedaily.com/2017/01/exceptionally-preserved-jurassic-sea-life-found-in-new-fossil-site/113997 https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-01/uota-epj012517.php Martindale, R. C., T. R. Them, B. C. Gill, S. M. Marroquín, and A. H. Knoll, 2017, A new Early Jurassic (ca. 183 Ma) fossil Lagerstätte from Ya Ha Tinda, Alberta, Canada. Geology (2017). DOI: 10.1130/G38808.1 (Open Access paper) http://geology.gsapubs.org/content/early/2017/01/09/G38808.1.abstract http://geology.gsapubs.org/content/early/2017/01/09/G38808.1.full.pdf+html Yours, Paul H.
  3. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since January 26, 2017. Canada Faunas and Localities Alberta Dalzell, M.T.J. (2007). Correlated Biostratigraphy and Palaeoecology of Microplankton from the Bearpaw Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian) of Alberta, Canada. Masters Thesis - University of Saskatchewan. Fanti, F. and T. Miyashita (2009). A high latitude vertebrate fossil assemblage from the Late Cretaceous of west-central Alberta, Canada: evidence for dinosaur nesting and vertebrate latitudinal gradient. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 275. Frebold, H. (1966). Upper Pliensbachian Beds in the Fernie Group of Alberta. Geological Survey of Canada, Paper 66-27. Martindale, R.C., et al. (2017). A new Early Jurassic (ca. 183 Ma) fossil Lagerstätte from Ya Ha Tinda, Alberta, Canada. The Geological Society of America, open access. (Thanks to Oxytropidoceras for finding this one!) Martindale, R.C., et al. (2017). Supplementary Data to "A new Early Jurassic fossil Lagerstätte from Ya Ha Tinda, Canada (~183 Ma)" - GSA Data Repository 2017066. Meijer Drees, N.C., et al. (2002). Lithostratigraphy, Sedimentology, Paleontology, Organic Petrology, and Organic Geochemistry of the Middle Devonian Ashern, Winnipegosis, and Eyot Formations in East-Central Alberta and West-Central Saskatchewan. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 572. Mellon, G.B. (1967). Stratigraphy and Petrology of the Lower Cretaceous Blairmore and Manville Groups, Alberta Foothills and Plains. Research Council of Alberta, Bulletin 21. Mychaluk, K.A., A.A. Levinson and R.L. Hall (2001). Ammolite: Iridescent Fossilized Ammonite from Southern Alberta, Canada. Gems and Gemology, Vol.37, Number 1. Scott, C.S. (2001). Middle Paleocene Mammals from Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Masters Thesis - University of Alberta. Scott, C.S., R.C. Fox and G.P. Youzwyshyn (2002). New earliest Tiffanian (late Paleocene) mammals from Cochrane 2, southwestern Alberta, Canada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 47(4). Simpson, G.G. (1927). Mammalian Fauna and Correlation of the Paskapoo Formation of Alberta. American Museum Novitates, Number 268. Wood, J.M., R.G. Thomas and J. Visser (1988). Fluvial Processes and Vertebrate Taphonomy: The Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation, South-Central Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 66. British Columbia Archibald, S.B., et al. (2011). Great Canadian Lagerstätten 1. Early Eocene Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington State). Geoscience Canada, Vol.38, Number 4. Archibald, S.B., et al. (2010). Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington): emergent communities in Early Eocene climates. GeoCanada 2010 - Working with the Earth. Caron, J.-B. and D.A. Jackson (2008). Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 258. Caron, J.-B. and D. Rudkin (eds.)(2009). A Burgess Shale Primer. History, Geology and Research Highlights. International Conference on the Cambrian Explosion, Field Trip Companion Volume. Dillhoff, R.M., E.B. Leopold and S.R. Manchester (2005). The McAbee flora of British Columbia and its relation to the Early-Middle Eocene Okanagan Highlands flora of the Pacific Northwest. Can.J. Earth Sci., Vol.42. Greenwood, D.R., et al. (2005). Fossil biotas from the Okanagan Highlands, southern British Columbia and northeastern Washington State: climates and ecosystems across an Eocene landscape. Can.J. Earth Sci., 42. Haggart, J.W., et al. (2009). Molluscan biostratigraphy and paleomagnetism of Campanian strata, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia: implications for Pacific coast North America biochronology. Cretaceous Research, 30. Hofmann, H.J., E.W. Mountjoy and M.W. Teitz (1985). Ediacaran fossils from the Miette Group, Rocky Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. Geology, Vol.13 Johns, M.J., C.R. Barnes and Y.R. Narayan (2005). Cenozoic and Cretaceous Ichtyoliths from the Tofino Basin and Western Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.8, Issue 2. Ludvigsen, R. (2001). The fossils at Driftwood Canyon Provincial Park: A management plan for BC parks. Ludvigsen, R. (1999). Deep Time and Ancient Life in the Columbia Basin. Living Landscapes, Royal British Columbia Museum. Mathewes, R.W., D.R. Greenwood and S.B. Archibald (2016). Paleoenvironments of the Quilchena flora, British Columbia during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum. Can.J. Earth Sci., 53. Morris, S.C. and R.A. Robison (1988). More Soft-Bodied Animals and Algae from the Middle Cambrian of Utah and British Columbia. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 122. Poinar, G., B. Archibald and A. Brown (1999). New Amber Deposit Provides Evidence of Early Paleogene Extinctions, Paleoclimates and Past Distributions. The Canadian Entomologist, 131. Schaeffer, B. and M. Mangus (1976). An Early Triassic Fish Assemblage from British Columbia. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.156, Article 5. Villeneuve, M. and R. Mathewes (2005). An Early Eocene age for the Quilchena fossil locality, southern British Columbia. Geological Survey of Canada, Current Research, 2005-A4. Zonneveld, J.-P., M.K. Gingras and S.G. Pemberton (2001). Trace fossil assemblages in a Middle Triassic mixed siliciclastic carbonate marginal marine depositional system, British Columbia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 166. Manitoba Bamburak, J.D., J. Hatcher and M.P.B. Nicholas (2012). Chemostratigraphy, paleontology and mineral potential of the Gammon Ferruginous Member of the Cretaceous Pierre Shale in southwestern Manitoba (parts of NTS 62F, G, H, J, K, N, O, 63C, F). In: Report of Activities 2012. Manitoba Innovation, Energy and Mines, Manitoba Geological Survey. Elias, R.J., et al. (2013). Ordovician-Silurian boundary interval in the Williston Basin outcrop belt of Manitoba: a record of global and regional environmental and biotic change. Field Trip Guidebook FT-C5/ Open File OF2013-1. McGregor, D.C., et al. (1971). Fossils of the Red River Formation (Cat Head Member), Manitoba. Contributions to Canadian Paleontology, Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 202. Young, G.A., et al. (2012). Great Canadian Lagerstätten 3. Late Ordovician Konservat-Lagerstätten in Manitoba. Geoscience Canada, Vol.39. Young, G.A., et al. Late Ordovician Lagerstatten in Manitoba, Canada: Glimpses of Soft-Bodied Diversity. New Brunswick Bay of Fundy Ecosystem Partnership (2010). Fundy's Fascinating Fossils: The Unique Palaeontology of the Bay of Fundy. Fundy Issues, Issue 31. Gilpin, J.B. (1874). Observations on some Fossil Bones found in New Brunswick, Dominion of Canada. Nova Scotian Institute of Natural Science, 3(4). Jutras, P., J. Utting and S.R. McCutcheon (2005). Basin inversion at the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian boundary in northern New Brunswick, Canada. Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology, Vol.53, Number 4. Kennedy, K. (2011). The Campbellton Formation, New Brunswick, Canada: A Sedimentological and Paleoenvironmental Description of an Early Devonian (Emsian) Vegetated Landscape. Masters Thesis - Dalhousie University. Newfoundland and Labrador Boyce, W.D. and W.L. Dickson (2006). Recent Fossil Finds in the Indian Islands Group, Central Newfoundland. Current Research, Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Natural Resources Geological Survey, Report 06-1. Boyce, W.D., J.S. Ash and B.H. O'Brien (1991). A New Fossil Locality in the Bay of Exploits, Central Newfoundland. Current Research, Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy, Geological Survey Branch, Report 91-1. Boyce, W.D., et al. (2000). The Upper St. George Group, Western Port Au Port Peninsula: Lithostratigraphy, Biostratigraphy, Depositional Environments and Regional Implications. Current Research (2000) Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy, Geological Survey, Report 2000-1. Bullock, R.J., J.R. Morris and D. Selby (2011). New Findings of Body and Trace Fossils in the St. Bride's Area, Cape St. Mary's Peninsula, Newfoundland. Current Research (2011) Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey Report 11-1. Clapham, M.E., G.M. Narbonne and J.G. Gehling (2003). Paleoecology of the oldest known animal communities: Ediacaran assemblages at Mistaken Point, Newfoundland. Paleobiology, 29(4). Gillespie, H. (1998). Acritarch Biostratigraphy and Taxonomy of the Waterhouse Formation (Upper Ordovician, Port Au Port Peninsula, Newfoundland). Masters Thesis - Memorial University of Newfoundland. O'Brien, S.J. and A.F. King (2004). Ediacaran Fossils from the Bonavista Peninsula (Avalon Zone), Newfoundland: Preliminary Descriptions and Implications for Regional Correlation. Current Research (2004) Newfoundland Department of Mines and Energy Geological Survey, Report 04-1. O'Brien, S.J., et al. (2006). Lithostratigraphic and Biostratigraphic Studies on the Eastern Bonavista Peninsula: An Update. Current Research (2006) Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Natural Resources Geological Survey, Report 06-1. Skovsted, C.B. and J.S. Peel (2007). Small shelly fossils from the argillaceous facies of the Lower Cambrian Forteau Formation of western Newfoundland. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(4). Northwest Territories Campbell, M. (2003). A Guide to Fossils in the Norman Wells Area, Northwest Territories. Northwest Territories Resources, Wildlife, and Economic Development - Oil and Gas Division. Kimmig, J.K.F. (2014). Taxonomy, Taphonomy and Paleoecology of a New Burgess Shale-Type Lagerstătte from the MacKenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada. Ph.D. Thesis - University of Saskatchewan. Kimmig, J.K.F. and B.R. Pratt (2015). Soft-bodied biota from the middle Cambrian (Drumian) Rockslide Formation, Mackenzie Mountains, northwestern Canada. Journal of Paleontology, 89(1). MacNaughton, R.B., B.R. Pratt and K.M. Fallas (2013). Observations on Cambrian stratigraphy in the eastern Mackenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories. Geological Survey of Canada, Current Research 2013-10. Poulton, T.P. (1991). Hettangian through Aalenian (Jurassic) Guide Fossils and Biostratigraphy, Northern Yukon and Adjacent Northwest Territories. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 410. Weston, T.C. (1892). Notes on the Miocene Tertiary Rocks of the Cypress Hills, North-West Territory of Canada. Transactions of the Nova Scotian Institute of Science, Session of 1892-'93. Nova Scotia Bay of Fundy Ecosystem Partnership (2010). Fundy's Fascinating Fossils: The Unique Palaeontology of the Bay of Fundy. Fundy Issues, Issue 31. Carpenter, D.K., et al. (2015). Early Pennsylvanian (Langsettian) Fish Assemblages from the Joggins Formation, Canada, and Their Implications for Palaeoecology and Palaeogeography. Palaeontology, Vol.58, Part 4. Denison, R.H. (1955). Early Devonian Vertebrates from the Knoydart Formation of Nova Scotia. Fieldiana Geology, Vol.37. Zodrow, E.L. and M. Mastalerz (2009). A proposed origin for fossilized Pennsylvanian plant cuticles by pyrite oxidation (Sydney Coalfield, Nova Scotia, Canada). Bulletin of Geosciences, 84(2). Nunavut Eberle, J.J., et al. (2014). First Record of Eocene Bony Fishes and Crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic. PLoS ONE, 9(5). Francis, J.E. (1988). A Fifty-Million-Year-Old Fossil Forest from Strathcona Fiord, Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada: Evidence for a Warm Polar Climate. Arctic, Vol.41, Number 4. Ontario Armstrong, D.K. and J.E.P. Dodge (2007). Paleozoic Geology of Southern Ontario. Sedimentary Geoscience Section, Ontario Geological Survey, Miscellaneous Release - Data 219. Brookfield, M.E., and C.E. Brett (1988). Paleoenvironments of the Mid-Ordovician (Upper Caradocian) Trenton limestones of southern Ontario, Canada: Storm sedimentation on a shoal-basin shelf model. Sedimentary Geology, 57. Fuentes, S.R. (2003). Faunal Distribution Across the Ordovician-Silurian Boundary in Ohio and Ontario. Masters Thesis - University of Cincinnati. Lehtola, K.A. (1973). Ordovician Vertebrates from Ontario. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.24, Number 4. Stumm, E.C. and J.D. Wright (1958). Check List of Fossil Invertebrates Described from the Middle Devonian Rocks of the Thedford-Arkona Region of Southwestern Ontario. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XIV, Number 7. Verma, H.M. (1979). Geology and Fossils. Craigleith Area, Ontario. Ontario Geological Survey, Guidebook Number 7. von Bitter, P.H., et al. (2007). Eremosa Lagerstatte - Exceptionally preserved soft-bodied biotas with shallow-marine shelly and bioturbating organisms (Silurian, Ontario, Canada). Geology, Vol.35, Number 10. Wright, J.D. and E.P. Wright (1963). The Middle Devonian Ipperwash Limestone of Southwestern Ontario and Two New Brachiopods Therefrom. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XVIII, Number 7. Wright, J.D. and E.P. Wright (1961). A Study of the Middle Devonian Widder Formation of Southwestern Ontario. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XVI, Number 5. Quebec Copper, P. and J. Jin (2012). Early Silurian (Aeronian) East Point Coral Patch Reefs of Anticosti Island, Eastern Canada: First Reef Discovery from the Ordovician/Silurian Mass Extinction in Eastern Laurentia. Geosciences, 2. Cournoyer, M. (2002). Fossils in the vicinity of Montreal. Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections, 17th Annual Meeting, Redpath Museum/McGill University. (Thanks to Oxytropidoceras for finding this one.) Harington, C.R. (2003). Quaternary Vertebrates of Quebec: A Summary. Geographie physique et Quaternaire, Vol.57, Number 1. la Société de Paléontologie du Québec. Twenty Fossil Sites Near Montreal. (Thanks to Oxytropidoceras for finding this one.) Saskatchewan Collom, C.J. (2000). High-resolution Stratigraphy, Regional Correlation, and Report of Molluscan Faunas: Colorado Group (Cenomanian-Coniacian Interval, Late Cretaceous), East-central Saskatchewan. In: Summary of Investigations 2000, Vol.1. Saskatchewan Geological Survey, Sask. Energy Mines, Misc. Rep. 2000-4.1. Cumbaa, S.L., C.J. Underwood and C.J. Schroder-Adams (2013). Paleoenvironments and Paleoecology of the Vertebrate Fauna from a Late Cretaceous Marine Bonebed, Canada. In: Mesozoic Fishes 5 - Global Diversity and Evolution. Arratia, C., H.-P. Schultze and M.V.H. Wilson (eds.), Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil, Munich, Germany. Meijer Drees, N.C., et al. (2002). Lithostratigraphy, Sedimentology, Paleontology, Organic Petrology, and Organic Geochemistry of the Middle Devonian Ashern, Winnipegosis, and Eyot Formations in East-Central Alberta and West-Central Saskatchewan. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 572. Rankin, B.D. (2009). Early late Paleocene mammals from the Roche Percee local fauna, southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Masters Thesis - University of Alberta[/b]. Tokaryk, T.T. and H.N. Bryant (2004). The Fauna from the Tyrannosaurus rex Excavation, Frenchman Formation (Maastrichtian), Saskatchewan. Summary of Investigations 2004, Vol.1, Saskatchewan Geological Survey. Wall, J.H., P. Johnston and T.P. Poulton (2002). Jurassic Microfossils and Bivalves from the Lower Member of the Gravelbourg Formation, Southern Saskatchewan. In: Summary of Investigations 2002, Volume 1. Saskatchewan Geological Survey, Sask. Industry and Resources Misc. Report 2002-4.1. Yukon Matthews, J.V., C.E. Schweger and O.L. Hughes (1990). Plant and Insect Fossils from the Mayo Indian Village Section (Central Yukon): New Data on Middle Wisconsinan Environments and Glaciation. Geographie physique et Quaternaire, Vol.44, Number 1. Poulton, T.P. (1991). Hettangian through Aalenian (Jurassic) Guide Fossils and Biostratigraphy, Northern Yukon and Adjacent Northwest Territories. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 410. Turner, D.G., et al. (2013). Middle to Late Pleistocene ice extents, tephrochronology and paleoenvironments of the White River area, southwest Yukon. Quaternary Science Reviews, 75. Yarnell, J.M. (2000). Paleontology of Two North American Triassic Reef Faunas: Implications for Terrane Paleogeography. Masters Thesis - The University of Montana. Canada - General Allison, C.W. and S.M. Awramik (1989). Organic-Walled Microfossils from Earliest Cambrian or Latest Proterozoic Tindir Group Rocks, Northwest Canada. Precambrian Research, 43. Caldwell, W.G.E. and B.R. North (1984). Cretaceous stage boundaries in the southern Interior Plains of Canada. Bull.geol.Soc. Denmark, Vol.33. Cumbaa, S.L., et al. (2006). Cenomanian Bonebed Faunas from the Northeastern Margin, Western Interior Seaway, Canada. In: Late Cretaceous vertebrates from the Western Interior. (Lucas, S,G. and R.M.Sullivan, eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 35. Fuentes, S.R.(1990). Vertebrates of the Last Interglaciation in Canada: A Review, With New Data. Geographie physique et Quaternaire, Vol. 44, Number 3. Holden, R. (1913). Some Fossil Plants from Eastern Canada. Annals of Botany, Vol.XXVII, Number CVI. McKellar, R.C. and A.P. Wolfe (2010). Canadian Amber. In: Biodiversity of fossils in amber from the major world deposits. Penney, D. (ed.), Siri Scientific Press. Obst, J.R., et al. (1991). Characterization of Canadian Arctic Fossil Woods. In: Tertiary Fossil Forests of the Geodetic Hills, Axel Heiberg Island, Arctic Archipelago, Christie, R.L. and N.J. McMillan (eds.), Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 403. Ollerenshaw, N.C. and L. Reynolds (eds.)(1991). Contributions to Canadian Paleontology. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 412. Middle Ordovician (Chazyan) Stratigraphy and Bryozoan and Conodont Faunas in the Hawkesbury Region, Eastern Ontario. A New Lower Silurian Callocystitid Cystoid from the Lake Timiskaming Region, Northern Ontario. Middle Devonian Goniatites from the Dunedin and Besa River Formations of Northeastern British Columbia. Lower Carboniferous Miospore Assemblages from the Hart River Formation, Northern Yukon Territory. A High Latitude Upper Triassic Flora from the Heiberg Formation, Sverdrup Basin, Arctic Archipelago. Lower Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) Ammonites and Bivalves from the Whitesail Lake Area, West-Central British Columbia. Phillips, A. (2008). A Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Marine Vertebrate-Rich Bioclastic Horizon from the Northeastern Margin of the Western Interior Seaway, Canada. Masters Thesis - Carleton University. Poulton, T.P., et al. (1994). Chapter 18. Jurassic and Lowermost Cretaceous Strata of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. In: Geological Atlas of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. Mossop, G.D. and I. Shetsen (comp.), Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists and Alberta Research Council. (169 MB for Lo-Res version, 526 MB for Hi-Res version).
  4. From Bonebeds to Paleoecology by Don Brinkman Extinct: The Philosophy of Palaeotology http://www.extinctblog.org/extinct/2016/7/11/paleoecology-in-the-badlands http://blogs.plos.org/paleocomm/2016/08/04/from-the-community-from-bonebeds-to-paleoecology/ Yours, Paul H.
  5. This fragment of dinosaur bone was in the old Hobberlin Museum collection, stuffed into a milk crate with a bunch of Cretaceous material from Alberta, Canada. Most seemed to be segments of long bones, but this stood out to me. Any help would be appreciated!
  6. Dear all, As I said long ago, this year I might be going to Canada. However, most of the time will be spent in Alberta for a dinosaur dig with Prof. Philip Currie. This basically washes away my plans of going to Vancouver Island and find heteromorphs on the Comox Valley. So, as I would still like to find some heteromorph ammonites, I was wondering whether there would be any heteromorph ammonite sites in the vicinity of Dinosaur Provincial Park (of preference less than 2 hours away, by car). Thanks for any help, Christian
  7. Tooth of a Tyrannosaurid. This tooth belongs to either Albertosaurus, Gorgosaurus or Daspletosaurus. Note the wear facets on the top and medial side of the tooth.
  8. It's located here in Alberta, Canada, but I can't say for sure this is where it came from. It's been passed down a few generations, but has essentially been sitting in a flower bed for the past 40+ years. I really know nothing about it.
  9. Hello everyone, please excuse me as I'm new here but I was hoping someone may be able to help identify what type of dinosaur this egg may have come from. Unfortunately I'm unable to give an exact location of the find, as it was found by my grandparents in the early 1950's in either southern Alberta or the northern USA. I have little to no knowledge in the field of paleontology so any help would be appreciated. Thanks for your help!
  10. A new paper describing a new oviraptorosaur from Canada is now available online: Gregory F. Funston and Philip J. Currie (2016). "A new caenagnathid (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria) from the Horseshoe Canyon Formation of Alberta, Canada, and a reevaluation of the relationships of Caenagnathidae". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Online edition: e1160910. doi:10.1080/02724634.2016.1160910. The fact that Apatoraptor was first thought to be an ornithomimosaur when first discovered but eventually re-identified as belonging to a caenagnathid upon further preparation of the specimen reminds me of the instance where Epichirostenotes was first considered an ornithomimid when first reported in the literature but eventually re-assigned to Caenagnathidae when ROM 43250 was fully prepared. Because Apatoraptor and Epichirostenotes are distinct from one another, it turns out those who thought that Caenagnathus and Chirostenotes might still be distinct even if they belonged in the same family were correct, even though the diversity of Edmontonian-Lancian caenagnathids isn't as high as that of Judithian/Kirtlandian caenagnathids.
  11. On occasion I'm asked about collecting regulations in Ontario and other provinces. This got me thinking what are the regulations across Canada. Listed below are various regulations pertaining to fossil collecting in different provinces across Canada. The information is merely an amalgamation of different sources with the sources linked or stated. I do not have the legal training to state whether fossil collecting is legal or not in each province but have put forth information that can help one come to a conclusion. Collecting fossils in Canada Fossils hold a great deal of scientific significance and can be the key to uncovering the lost linkage between ancestral organisms providing answers to modern day life. As a student geologist I work with beautiful specimens that have been properly catalogued for scientific research. As a member of a local geology club I have been searching for fossils for many years. Collecting fossils is a fun way to enjoy the outdoors but it is important that proper cataloguing and information be obtained when collecting. It is also important to understand local laws when collecting. In Canada every province has a different perspective on collecting fossils, ranging from provinces where collecting in forbidden to others with limited regulations. Ontario Sourced from the Fossil Forum: “Ontario is one of the less restrictive Canadian provinces. In speaking to one of the Paleobiology curators from the Royal Ontario Museum, you can take a fossil out of the province without a permit, if it is valued under $500 Canadian.” Source: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/46868-fossil-collecting-laws-and-crossing-the-border/ Ontario has been doing a good job at promoting the province as a great source for recreational geology. For more information on recreational geology check out: http://ohto.ca/wp-content/uploads/Informational-Resources_FINAL.pdf British Columbia Source from the British Columbia government website: “Amateur collectors bring many important discoveries to the attention of professional paleontologists. The contribution of amateur collectors is becoming increasingly important for scientific discovery as the number of professional paleontologists in the field decreases. Recreational or amateur collecting is restricted to the collection of small amounts of the types of fossils that are common at the site. When unusual or rare specimens are discovered or when small quantities of fossils are present at a site, amateur collectors are encouraged to assist by reporting the findings to determine if they are significant. Under the Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing Act, the Minister has the authority to grant a general permission to the public to collect fossils, and to affix terms and conditions to that permission. Until the Minister’s formal permission is provided, minor collecting may continue as long as the amounts are small, the fossils are common at the site, the fossils are kept for personal use, and are not sold, or removed from BC. Exceptions to this general permission to collect fossils from the surface are where the land is in a park or protected area, or where exclusive rights have been issued to another party. The Crown retains ownership of fossils collected by amateur collectors. Amateur collectors may retain possession of the fossils as long as they do not sell them or export them from the Province without permission. The permission to collect for recreational purposes does not apply to the removal of vertebrate skeletal fossils or fossil tracks. The removal of these fossils must be undertaken by a qualified person holding a research permit. Guidelines will be developed and made publicly available to assist amateur collectors in following the guidelines relating to quantity and type of fossils that are allowed to be gathered.” Source: http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/employment-business/natural-resource-use/land-use/fossil-management/collection-and-use Alberta Sourced from the Royal Tyrrell Museum: “If you live in Alberta, and legally surface collected, you may keep the material as a custodian of the fossil, although ownership remains within the Province of Alberta. The Historical Resources Act prohibits removal of fossils from the province without a Disposition Certificate issued by the Government of Alberta.” Surface collected: the act of collecting a fossil that requires no ad (no use of tools) and can be picked up freely. Source: http://www.tyrrellmuseum.com/research/fossils_law.htm Manitoba Reading The Heritage Resources Act from Manitoba it appears that all fossils, which fall under “Heritage object,” are protected and collecting is not permitted. Sourced from Manitoba Laws The Heritage Resource Act: Section 51 - “No person shall destroy, damage or alter any heritage object, whether or not the person is the owner thereof, or any human remains.” Section 52 – “No person shall remove a heritage object from the province, whether or not the person is the owner thereof, except pursuant to a heritage permit and in accordance with such terms and conditions as may be prescribed by the minister and set out in or attached to the heritage permit.” Source: http://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/statutes/ccsm/h039-1e.php Saskatchewan Sourced from The Heritage Property Act: Section 66.1 – Ownership of vertebrate fossils is by the crown. Section 66.2 (7) “No person shall buy, sell, offer for sale, trade, or otherwise dispose of or remove from Saskatchewan any archaeological object or palaeontological object found in or taken from land in Saskatchewan without the written permission of the minister.” Section 67 appears as though the act of searching for and removing fossils requires a permit. Source: http://www.qp.gov.sk.ca/documents/English/Statutes/Statutes/H2-2.pdf Quebec Sourced from Cultural Property Act: Looking over the Cultural Property Act it appears as though Quebec has the most ambiguous rules pertaining to paleontological items. There is numerous use of “Archaeological property” but under the definition section there is no mention of fossils or palaeontological objects concluding that this wouldn’t apply. Typing in palaeontology or fossils, no record shows up. Sources: http://www2.publicationsduquebec.gouv.qc.ca/dynamicSearch/telecharge.php?type=2&file=/B_4/B4_A.html New Brunswick Sourced from New Brunswick government website: “The importance of our palaeontological record is officially recognized in the Heritage Conservation Act. Formally asserting provincial ownership of all palaeontological objects, it stipulates that any fossils discovered in the Province must not be destroyed or removed from sites where they are found, without the required permit.” “Any activity carried out for the purpose of obtaining and documenting data on fossils, including excavation and/or removal, is defined by the Act as palaeontological field research. Exacting standards must be met under any permit authorizing such research in regard to observation, collection, preservation and recording techniques.” “Individuals who wish to study fossils, but who are not considered professionals, may also apply for field research permits. To qualify, they must demonstrate basic understanding of palaeontology, as well as appropriate knowledge of current collection and reporting techniques. The relevant application form is accessible here. Enquiries from all those interested in such palaeontological research in New Brunswick should contact the New Brunswick Museum.” Source: http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/thc/heritage/content/heritage_conservationact/palaeontological.html Nova Scotia Sourced from the Nova Scotia Government website: Nova Scotia is very similar to New Brunswick. Collecting fossils in Nova Scotia is only to be carried out by those with a “Heritage Research Permit.” This permit allows you to search for fossils, document, and photograph. Collected specimens are to be deposited at the Nova Scotia Museum. Source: https://cch.novascotia.ca/exploring-our-past/special-places/palaeontology-permits-and-guidelines Prince Edward Island Sourced from Government of P.E.I. Under the Heritage Places Protection Act fossils fall within “historical resource” as palaeontological. Going through the act I was unable to see any distinct mentioning of how the law applies to collecting and maintaining of fossils. Source: http://www.gov.pe.ca/law/statutes/pdf/h-03_1.pdf Newfoundland Sourced from the Geological Survey of Canada, also Natural Resources: It appears as though the Geological Survey has a good section describing various collecting tips indicating that collecting is permitted in Newfoundland. I did not come across any regulations pertaining to the removal of fossils from Newfoundland. “When looking for fossils, it important to remember that complete specimens are rarely found. While complete specimens are better for scientific description in paleontological studies, even a poorly preserved fossil fragment is often enough for field identification and dating of rocks. Fossils can be found by picking through weathered rubble along cliffs, beaches, streams, quarries, road and railway cuts and rock outcrops. Finding them in place, however, requires a careful layer-by-layer examination of the enclosing sedimentary rocks with a hammer and chisel. Many Newfoundland fossils are quite small and easily overlooked. It is wise, therefore, to have a magnifying glass or a hand lens for checking favorable rock types. Good eye protection is essential, preferably in the form of safety glasses. A good geological hammer with either a chisel or a point made of well tempered, shatter-free metal is advisable. A stone chisel and small sledge hammer are also useful. Broken fossil specimens can be repaired in the field with nontoxic white glues such as Lepage Bond Fast. Modelling clay, liquid latex (such as Lewiscraft rubbertex compound or ETI Mold Builder) or plaster can be used to obtain a replica of an otherwise nonretrievable specimen. Fossils which can't be collected may also be photographed or sketched. After collection, all specimens ought to be securely wrapped in tissue or newspaper and then placed in a well labelled bag to prevent damage during transportation. It is also a good idea to note the location of the fossil collection on a map and/or in a fieldbook in order to make it easier to find again if the need arises.” “Note: Fossil collecting is illegal in National and Provincial Parks and Ecological Reserves, unless you have special permits.” Source: http://www.nr.gov.nl.ca/mines&en/geosurvey/education/fossils.stm IMPORTANT: on the Department of Natural Resources there is a link to a new legislation, “Significant Fossils.” Source: http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/2012/tcr/0109n01.htm Nunavut Sourced from Government of Canada website: Searching for and collecting fossils in Nunavut are similar to those of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Manitoba. In order to collect fossils from a “palaeontological site,” as defined by the act as being any site with fossils, one must obtain a permit. Once obtaining a permit, a series of guidelines are laid out to produce a formal report which will be submitted to the Government of Nunavut. Specimens collected in the field are to be deposited to the minister of the government of Nunavut responsible for culture and heritage before March 31 of the year following the permit issue. March 31st seems to be a popular date amongst government organizations when fossils are to be deposited. Source: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2001-220/FullText.html Northwest Territories Sourced from the Northern News Services: Based on the article linked below it appears as though there is no regulations on fossil in the Northwest Territories, although it appears as though researchers are thinking it is a good idea. Source: http://www.nnsl.com/frames/newspapers/2014-01/jan27_14fos.html Yukon Sourced from the Yukon Government website: “You are required under the Historic Resources Act to tell the Yukon Palaeontology Program about any fossils found in the Yukon. Any fossils found on settlement lands are to be reported to the appropriate First Nation. The Historic Resources Act applies everywhere in Yukon except in National Parks. If you find a fossil, please leave it where it is, record its location, take a photo if possible, and contact the Yukon Palaeontology program or appropriate First Nation. If you find a fossil in the Yukon, you may be allowed to keep it in your possession, but the Yukon Government or First Nation owns it. If you find a fossil on private land, the land owner takes custody of it unless some other agreement has been made. The Yukon First Nation government will set terms and conditions to protect the fossil.” “The Heritage Resources Act prohibits the collection of fossils without a permit. If you are from a qualified research institute and are interested in collecting fossils in the Yukon you require a Scientists and Explorers Research License. Please contact the Yukon Palaeontology Program for further information.” Source: http://www.tc.gov.yk.ca/faq_palaeontology.html Additional sources: Canada Wide General Information http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/docs/r/pfa-fap/notes.aspx
  12. Hi all, I'm traveling to Alberta with my 12 year old son next week and we're hoping to spend a fossil hunting day at the badlands. I hear Alberta has strict rules about fossil hunting, and I would really want to avoid breaking those. I'd appreciate any advice both in terms of what to do and not to do, and especially in terms of where (outside of National Parks) we can go to spend a day in the Badlands... Thanks very much for any help!
  13. Hi, I found this on a sandbank in the middle of the Old Man River in Lethbridge, Alberta. On the same sandbank we found ammolite. Is this just a rock or could it be bone? It is very heavy It is porous
  14. i am going to drumheller this summer and i am wondering if there are any good sites in the area. please include directions and fossils found thanks
  15. One is of the corel(?) and the other two are what I think is a Crinoid, but I'm not sure. They are surface fossils found in North East BC around Jasper. (Canada) If you need better photographs I'll make more. Thanks.
  16. Ok, i have a dinosaur bone that is hollow. I am wondering whether or not it is a theropod bone or not, as theropods had hollow bones. Can somebody please identify it for me? I found this bone in the Dinosaur Park Formation of southern Alberta, right outside of Dinosaur Provincial Park
  17. http://www.lightsource.ca/media/media_release_20130426.php Experiments will determine dinosaur’s skin colour and why the fossil preserved intact"One of the only well preserved dinosaur skin samples ever found is being tested at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) synchrotron to determine skin colour and to explain why the fossilized specimen remained intact after 70-million years." Check it out! =P
  18. if you have any good ammonite collecting localities near milk river, please post directions here. thanks!
  19. 'Ocean Predator' Plesiosaur Fossil Found Near Grande Prairie, HQ Grande Prairie, Sept. 14, 2012‎ http://hqgrandeprairie.com/news/local/news/Local/12/09/14/Ocean-Predator-Plesiosaur-Fossil-Found-Near-Grande-Prairie Ancient fossil could be evidence of new species Calgary Herald - ‎Sept. 15, 2012‎ http://www.calgaryherald.com/technology/Ancient+fossil+could+evidence+species/7247708/story.html http://www.edmontonjournal.com/technology/Grande+Prairie+unearths+rare+million+year+fossil/7243628/story.html best wishes, Paul H.
  20. Rare triceratops fossil found almost on Alberta museum's doorstep, The Canadian Press, August 17, 2012 http://www.ctvnews.c...orstep-1.919099 and http://www.vancouver...7275/story.html Triceratops fossils discovered in Alberta by Katie Schneider Toronto Sun, August 17, 2012, http://www.torontosu...ered-in-alberta Best wishes, Paul H.
  21. Howdy Folks, I found this on the river bank 2-3 summers back in a limestone formation near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. Any idea what it is, if it's anything? Is there a fossil under this, is this the fossil? I really don't know anything about this stuff, so I default to the experts here! Thanks a bunch! Looking forward to hunting for more fossils next summer! Jify