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Found 17 results

  1. I'm still on the fence about if Nanotyannus l. is a valid genus or not. I used to be firmly on the "Juvenile T.rex" side with Carr but some arguments such as the odd limb proportions on "Bloody Mary", tooth counts in actual juvenile Tyrannosaurus like "Baby Bob", and there being two "types" of Tyrannosaurid teeth in Hell Creek with overlapping sizes but very different shapes which don't all seem to be cases of it being teeth from different parts of the mouth, have shifted me to being open to both sides. I suppose it does make ecological sense for there to be a medium-size carnivore in the same region as a very large predator as the prey taken would likely differ drastically. So while I'm undecided, I can certainly see either argument being true. But hypothetically speaking, if Nanotyrannus turns out to be a valid genus, what branch of the family tree exactly would it come from? Based off time and location I'd be tempted to say it's a Tyrannosaurinae like Tarbosaurus or Tyrannosaurus, but last I checked most definite members of that group tended to be a lot more robust. I also recall when it was first described, Gilmore called it a species of Gorgosaurus. The lean build and thinner teeth do align with Albertosaurinae, but they could be convergently evolved I suppose.
  2. Are these tyrannosaurus teeth?

    I didn't know which place to post this, but I found this online and I was wondering if these are in fact genuine T-Rex tooth? Thank you very much.
  3. Albertosaurus tooth

    Hi all. I saw really nice Albertosaurus tooth for not too expensive but still quite a bit (because it’s a Tyrannosaurid) I was wondering if I should consider getting it,for my birthday. It would be a really nice piece,especially removed from its matrix,cleaned,reglue and possibly restaured. What do you think? Here are some pictures. Thanks for your advice! Appreciate it.
  4. Hello everyone. I saw this nice Albertosaurus tooth fragment online being sold for relatively cheap. I thought it had nice size,serrations and tip. It is from the Judith formation in Montana. Do you think it is worth considering? Or do you think I should keep my money. If I could get it a bit repaired and nicely reglue the fragments,It could be quite neat I think. It would be my first Tyrannosaurid in my collection (and my only for a long time). What do you think? Here are the 3 pictures I have. Thanks alot,Regards
  5. Hi All, I'm new to this forum and thought I'd send over images of my theropod teeth plus one extremely impressive sauropod from Madagascar. Hope you like them! Paul
  6. Albertosaurus?

    Hi, I recently got hold of this 1" premaxillary tooth which was found in the Judith River Formation, Montana. Could any of the local expects confirm whether this is Albertosaurus? Thanks in advance
  7. Judith River Tyrannosaur

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    30 mm nicely preserved tyrannosaur tooth. As I understand, it is impossible to distinguish between Gorgosaurus, Daspletosaurus and Albertosaurus from Judith River Fm.
  8. Tyrannosaur tooth

    From the album Dinosaur teeth

    Tyrannosaur indet. Campanian (80 million years ago) Two Medicine Formation Drumheller, Alberta, Canada
  9. I find it interesting when I see Tyrannosaurid material for sale, from the Judith River of Montana, that so little is understood of what actually is being offered. Most sellers call their specimen either Daspletosaurus or Albertosaurus and a few, when it comes to teeth, properly identify them as Tyrannosaurid indet. Very few will label anything Gorgosaurus unless it's really small. Yet none of these Tyrannosaurids have been described from this fauna and Albertosaurus may not even be represented. So what is currently known with the major Tyrannosaurids. I've tried to look around and gather what information is available and put it together in its simplest form so it's understood, if there are missteps let me know. Sorry, it's from my narrow collector perspective Let me prefix this by saying this is an area that is constantly evolving based with new discoveries and research. Papers just a few years old can already be obsolete and views are changing. The other issue is that since so little material has been discovered in some strata that there may not be consensus among paleontologist but thats not new and we also know that their ego's run high. Not here to debate anything. Tyrannosaurids Described by age/strata: Late Maastrichtian deposits 69 - 66 mya (Lance/HellCreek/Scollard Formations et al. ) Tyrannosaurus rex Nanotyrannus lancensis Very Late Campanian / Mid Maastrichtian deposits 73 -67 mya (Horseshoe Canyon Formation) Albertosaurus sarcophagus Late Campanian deposits 75.1 - 74.4 mya (Two Medicine Formation) Daspletosaurus horneri (just described) (this is described just at the very end of the TM FM not all, age of deposit where collected is very important) Mid Campanian deposits 76.6 - 75.1mya (Two Medicine Formation) Gorgosaurus sp. does exist not nammed Mid Campanian deposits 76.7 - 75.2 mya (Belly River Group) Daspletosaurus torosus Mid Campanian deposits 76.7 - 75.1 mya (Dinosaur Park Formation) Gorgosaurus libratus What is important to note is that no Tyrannosaurid's have been described from the Judith River Formation (80-75 mya) of Montana. Since the stratigraphy is similiar to that of eastern Alberta it's fair to assume the Tyrannosaurids like Daspletosaurus and Gorgosaurus would be present but not Albertosaurus which is younger in age. A note from an article I read stated that Albertosaurus and Daspletosaurus are stratigraphically separate, with the former from the late Campanian to Maastrichtian Horseshoe Canyon Formation, and the latter coming from the middle Campanian Belly River Group. Additional discoveries and research will determine if this holds up. So as a collector you need to take a look at what you have labeled and some may need to be updated and keep this in mind with your next acquisition. Remember when trying to acquire tyrannosaurid material don't get hung up on the name, focus on the bone or tooth since it will be with you forever while names can change. Chart clearly showing the distribution by age (the Two Medicine Taxon is now D. horneri) Tyrant Dinosaur Evolution Tracks the Rise and Fall of Late Cretaceous Oceans Mark A. Loewen1*, Randall B. Irmis1, Joseph J. W. Sertich2, Philip J. Currie3, Scott D. Sampson1 PDF: journal.pone.0079420.PDF Carr's Blog (Chart) http://tyrannosauroideacentral.blogspot.com/2017/04/introducing-daspletosaurus-horneri-two.html?m=0 This is an FYI: Appalachiosaurus montgomeriensis no longer considered a Tyrannosaurid but a basal Tyrannosauroid if that's really important or relevant to collectors. (PDF from above)
  10. Albertosaurus

    From the album Nigel's album

    23.5mm
  11. Albertosaurus tooth

    From the album Nigel's album

    Bought in numerous pieces, patched together using a different coloured filler to highlight original areas.
  12. Albertosaurus?

    Hello everybody, i just bought this beautifull tooth of (what they say) an albertosaurus. but the tooth has some simalarities with nanotyrranus. so i thought: maybe the people from the fossils forum could say something about it.
  13. Hi everyone, I am starting my first dinosaur model. A 1.40 scale scene of an Albertosaurus taking down a Parasaurolophus. Here is the sketch I have made before starting the sculpt and a first picture of the armature as well. After a quick trip to the oven it should be ready for the next layer of clay ! I have also made the separate Albertosaurus armature, but will sculpt it when I'll be done with the Parasaurolophus.
  14. Tyrannosaurs Teeth Collection

    From the album Dinosaur Fossils collection

    Collection of North American Tyrannosaur teeth: T-Rex, Daspletosaurus, Gorgosaurus, Nanotyrannus, Albertosaurus and Aublysodon
  15. Tyrannosaurs teeth Collection

    From the album Dinosaur Fossils collection

    Assortment of North American Tyrannosaur teeth - T-Rex, Nanotyranus, Albertosaurus & Daspletosaurus
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