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Found 230 results

  1. What happened to this ammonite

    Hello all I have had this ammonite for quite some time now, but since it has been tucked away in a drawer for the last couple of months. There is something weird about this piece however. The front looks pretty normal, except is a bit deformed. But on the back, it looks like the ammonite exploded. Hard to explain so I hope the pictures help. I've heard of exploded ammonites before so I wonder if this is one. Thanks all for your help
  2. Summer vacation fossil hunting week. Like each summer Natalie and I spend 1 week of our holiday for a fossil hunting trip. Usually the destination for this is the Isle of Wight, but due to the current covid situations we had to choose another location. So we went for 1 week to the French coast altering between late Cretaceous and Jurassic deposits.. Although there were no big tide or storms we still got our fair share of fossils in the boulders on the beaches and we even had a few spots of gault clay exposed where we found some nice phosphate ammonites and crustaceans. I’ll let you all enjoy the holiday pictures: Natalie found this exqusite little lobster in situ on the beach on the 1st day: ( Hoploparia longimana, Albian ( Gault clay ) ) soon joined by another specimen. Ichthyosaur vert from the Kimmeridgian: more beach: jurassic ripplemarks: Chalky ammonites in the loose boulders: Mantelliceras sp. : lower Cenomanian Cunningtoniceras inerme Mid. Cenomanian And a large one found by a local collector that we got to take back home ( Thx a lot Luc ) ( Lewesiceras peramplum, Turonian ) And a few pieces after cleanup and prepwork: Albian Ammonites from the gault clay: Gault clay crabs: a few of the chalky ammonites: a nice rare heteromorph: Turrilites scheuchzerianus mid. Cenomanian before and after prep:
  3. New Feathered Carnivorous Dinosaur Found in Brazil by Enrico de Lazaro, Sci.News, July 14, 2020 http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/aratasaurus-museunacionali-08633.html Fossilised foot of a three-toed dinosaur that lived in Brazil 115 million years ago is identified as belonging to a new species that may be a forerunner of today's birds. Daily Mail https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-8517113/Fossilised-foot-three-toed-dinosaur-lived-Brazil-115-million-years-ago-found.html The open access paper is: Sayão, J.M., Saraiva, A.Á.F., Brum, A.S., Bantim, R.A.M., de Andrade, R.C.L.P., Cheng, X., de Lima, F.J., de Paula Silva, H. and Kellner, A.W., 2020. The first theropod dinosaur (Coelurosauria, Theropoda) from the base of the Romualdo Formation (Albian), Araripe Basin, Northeast Brazil. Scientific Reports, 10(1), pp.1-15. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-67822-9 Yours, Paul H.
  4. A Cretaceous walk on the beach

    Last Saturday we finally went back to the Cretaceous deposits at the northern French coast. On some spots on the beach the gault clay deposits were visible, this delivered a few beautiful belemnites ( Neohibolites minimus ) and from time to time other small fossils washed out of the clay and scattered in the shingle. The chalk boulders near the clifs were not very productive, apart from a very rare Ptychodus tooth. This one made our day.
  5. Trip to Folkestone

    Went to Folkestone (Early Cretaceous, Albian) for the second time a couple of weeks ago. Last time I mostly climbed among the big rocks looking in the gaps for fossils but this time due to some poor navigating we accessed the beach from the opposite end this time around. This turned out well though as this stretch of beach has few of those big rocks but good access to the cliffs and slumps. We ended up spending most of the trip picking through the cliff base and fresh fall. This produced some nice ammonites, though it was still difficult to find whole ammonites as is the case with this location. We also found some nice gastropods well preserved, though very delicate, in the clay, as well as belemnites, bivalves and lots of ammonite fragments. My favourite find is the Eutrephoceras clementinum nautilus as I believe they are fairly rare and the colours on it are great. Also the Euhoplites proboscideus is a lovely shade and nicely detailed (Good find boyfriend). ID's are somewhat tentative so if you have any suggestions I'd be grateful. ??
  6. Brachiopod or Bivalve?

    Kiowa formation and Albian. Approximately 1.3cm long and its quite flat and thin. Not sure if it's brachiopod, more specifically a lingula brachiopod, or a bivalve. Unfortunately the umbo is missing so I'm not sure if it's symmetrical or not. I'm leaning more on bivalve but I would like to read your opinion. What's the lowest taxonomy level you can identify?
  7. A fragment of something; I thought it might be a part of fish spine or decapod pincer. From Kiowa formation and Albian. Approximately 5mm long.
  8. Kiowa Mysteries

    All from Kiowa formation (Albian). Identifying fossils from Kiowa formation has been incredibly challenging for me the last few months and I would need help on here! These possible fossil fragments have features that made me have second thoughts on whether if it's just suggestively rocks. They are suspiciously of biological origins, but I would like your opinions. #1: approximately 3mm long. It's quite smooth and featureless with some mineral staining. #2: approximately 10mm long. top view bottom view and it's fairly flat ...Continued below.
  9. Odd Albian Fish Tooth

    Any idea what the tooth on the left is? I know the other two are pycnodontids but I have never found anything like the one on the left. It is very cylindrical in cross section and has the odd "capped" end. Closest thing I could find in my reference library was a diplodicus tooth but this seems way to small. The site is in the Upper Glen Rose Formation (Albian) of Central Texas. This site has produced pycnodontids, turtle and crocodilian bones & teeth.
  10. Another Glen Rose Vertebrate

    There is a location close to where I work in Central Texas that has produced some pretty nice fossils over time. It is a rather unassuming road cut that at first glance and a quick scan looks like the usual mix of clam and snail steinkerns and mostly busted up oysters. Typical Upper Glen Rose Formation. But early on I had found that it also included one of the upper echinoid marker beds. In Units 6 & 7 there are thin beds loaded with oysters and echinoids. Mostly the very typical Loriolia rosana but also the occasional Coenholectypus planatus or rare C. ovatus as well as Heteraster, Phymosoma and, again rare, Polydiadema. Within that thin layer I would also find bryozoans and crustaceans. As I climbed the cut one day to get to the echinoid layer I came across a fairly decent ammonite as well and that got me to pay more attention to the rest of the cut. Then last year I had a nice talk with a gentleman named William (Bill) Rader who has been doing research for years in our local rocks. You can find his name attached to all sorts of papers on everything from echinoids to crabs. Bill told me to look there for vertebrate fossils, including crocodiles. Well duh, the next time I go I find a crocodile bone (there's a post from me last year on that) Yesterday I decided to put some hours in at the shop and on the way home stopped to see what the recent rains had exposed. I found some Loriolias and then I found this. Any ideas? I have some swags in mind but I have never been a big collector of vertebrate material.
  11. I try to identify any fossils on my own before I post it on here, that's how I learn! Anyway, I found these three shark teeth while pre-washing the matrices from Kiowa Formation (Location: Ellsworth county, Kansas. Age: Albian). A couple of them came loose during pre-washing and I found another one still in the matrix. Tooth #1: Is this tooth from Meristodonoides sp.? The views are from front and back of this tooth. Approximately 2mm long. Tooth #2: Is this also from Meristodonoides sp.? Approximately 3mm long. Tooth #3: Is this from Leptostyrax sp.? Front and back views of this tooth. Approximately 6mm long.
  12. Fish tooth #2?

    I named this topic as Fish tooth #2? because this fossil is very similar to my another fossil in a previous topic a while ago. Nobody really have any consensus on what it is and I thought it might be a fish tooth. I hope I will be lucky this time to have someone identify it for me with confidence. Located in Ellsworth county, Kansas, age of Albian, and from Kiowa Formation. It's approximately 4mm long. I know identifying specimens from Kiowa Formation can be a real pain since it's so little researched! lol...
  13. Protolamna cappettai Kazakhstan

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Albian age Protolamna cappettai from Kolbay, Kazakhstan
  14. Protolamna cappettai Kazakhstan

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Albian age Protolamna cappettai from Kolbay, Kazakhstan
  15. Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Stary Oskol Dwardius woodwardi.
  16. Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Stary Oskol Dwardius woodwardi.
  17. I found these that resembles burrow or root cast in Ellsworth county, Kansas, USA from my previous trip. The formation these came from are most likely Kiowa formation/Kiowa Shale and the age is Albian. Here's the link to my previous trip. I'm just catching up with the prepping and sorting my fossils from my previous trips. I am wondering if it is some sort of ichnofossils. Is it burrow, root cast, or something else? Also, is it possible for it to be from geological origin rather than a true ichnofossil? This one is the largest I found. The center is poorly cemented sandstone and can be easily brushed off with a toothbrush while the outside layer is hard. Notice the winkles around the interior bend. The measurement is in inches (I know I need to get a metric system badly, my apologies!)
  18. Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Kursk Region, Russia Dwardius woodwardi tooth.
  19. Dwardius woodwardi Russia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Kursk Region, Russia Dwardius woodwardi tooth.
  20. Interesting fossil

    I found this very interesting fossil yesterday and I do not know what it is. Found it in Ellsworth County by Kanopolis reservoir. It's from Kiowa formation/Kiowa Shale and age is Albian. Dimension is 5/16 inches wide and 3/8 inches long or about 8 mm wide and 9.5mm long. I have never seen anything like this before and I hope somebody else have an idea what it came from!
  21. Fish tooth?

    I found this matrix containing something that reminds me of the fossilized fish tooth pictures that I have seen around on here. When I noticed this, I chipped this matrix section off of a larger shell hash plate containing mostly Turritella sp. and bivalves. Its original location is in Ellsworth county, Kansas at Kanopolis reservoir. Age of this matrix is Albian and it is from Kiowa formation-Longford Member. Length of this 'tooth' is about .25 inches/6.5 mm. Can anyone identify what it is? It is currently soaking in a bowl of water, I hope to remove more of the matrix off to get a better look at it. Do you have any advice/tips on how to do it without breaking the 'tooth'? As you can see it, it's very small and I have nearly no experience in prepping the fossils beyond the washing and brushing with toothbrush.
  22. Undescribed Albian Shark Species Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed shark species from the Toolebuc Formation of Australia. Albian in age.
  23. Undescribed Albian Shark Species Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed shark species from the Toolebuc Formation of Australia. Albian in age.
  24. Hello forum members! With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection. Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian. The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection. Unfortunately it is so small that the photo's are not as sharp as I would have liked, but I think they are good enough. It is Squalicorax primaevus from the Middle Albian Argiles tégulines of Courcelles, Aube Department, France. See you guys tomorrow, Sander
  25. Unknown Fish Genus

    Hello there! A year ago I bought a fossil fish from Brazil at a convention, yet I am unaware of the animals genus. The fossil has a lenght of 37 cm's, and a skull the lenght of 7 cm. 0,7 cm is the average lenght of the individual vertebrae, 39 vertebrae are vsible in the fossil. Skull bones: Maxilla: 4 cm Subopegulum: 4.6 cm (lenght) 3 cm (height) Operculum: 4.6 cm (lenght) 3.5 cm (height) Dentary: 3,2 cm Height of Tail Fin: 7.9 cm Age Location: Presumably Romualdo Formation, based on Matrix and Preservation Aptian-Albian More Pictures in the comments, I am, somehow to dumb to know how to make an image smaller
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