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Found 204 results

  1. Found this in Comanche Peak limestone formation in Central Texas. I'm thinking Eoradiolites quadratus but not sure if there's enough info to nail down species. Apex to apex measures approximately 1.5 cm for three different samples. I will slowly post more pics of the other specimens, as I reduce photo sizes without losing quality. Thanks for your help.
  2. A few weeks back the Paleontological Society of Austin went out on one of our monthly field trips. The weather was still quite warm and we decided to keep it closer to home so no one would be to wrung out when we were done. We are hopefully at the tail end of a rather brutal drought with constant triple digit temps that started back in June. We picked three sites within 90 minutes of Austin that took us up thru the Glen Rose Formation, bottom to top. We started at a site in the Lower Member known as the micro zone. Fossils big enough to see from a standing position are few but if you get down and crawl around you can be rewarded with a crazy variety of tiny echinoids, starfish and crinoids and other odd bits in amongst the usual molluscs. The second site was at the very top of the Lower Member in the Salenia texana zone and folks found their share. But it was the last stop way up in Unit 7 of the Upper Member that I found my keeper* for the day. I had collected this site over the years and knew it as good for small echinoids and on occasion ammonites. But I was going back with some fresh information provided by the local researcher William Rader. Bill Rader had informed me that the site produced vertebrate material including many years before a crocodile scute. When we got there I spent time in the ammonite zone and helping others find fossils but it was at the tail end of the afternoon as I was thinking about the drive home that I moved to some lower layers that generally just produce common molluscs. AND BAM! Bones... Now I just assumed they were turtle which isn't uncommon in the Glen Rose but always a good find. I found two of the pieces within inches and they fit together. Jamie Shelton was there and I called her over to help me scan the spot with an extra set of eyes. I found a third piece before we quit. The next day was Identification Day at Texas Memorial Museum and PSA was manning the invertebrate table. But I knew there would be a few vertebrate specialists as well. As the day wound down I found a moment to show them to Chris Sagebiel of UT. He wasn't quite sure at first but when I mentioned that croc material was known from the site he immediately thought that it was a match. * Chris asked what I was planning on doing with the specimen (nudge nudge) and I agreed it should go to the Vertebrate lab here at UT. Here are some pics of the bones and a few from the day.
  3. Undescribed species Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed species from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  4. Undescribed species Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed species from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  5. Cretoxyrhina vraconensis Texas

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Waco, Texas Cretoxyrhina vraconensis. Albian in age.
  6. Cretoxyrhina vraconensis Texas

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Waco, Texas Cretoxyrhina vraconensis. Albian in age.
  7. From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Currently undescribed Cardabiodontid species from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  8. From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Currently undescribed Cardabiodontid species from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  9. From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed species of shark from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. The central fold in the root and shape reminds me of Dallasiella.
  10. From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed species of shark from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. The central fold in the root and shape reminds me of Dallasiella.
  11. Archeolamna sp. Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Archeolamna sp. from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  12. Archeolamna sp. Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Archeolamna sp. from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  13. Leptostyrax sp. Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Leptostyrax sp. from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  14. Leptostyrax sp. Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Leptostyrax sp. from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  15. Undescribed species Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed shark species from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  16. Undescribed species Australia

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed shark species from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age.
  17. From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed shark from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age. This tooth possesses folds along the enamel on both sides of the tooth (hard to see in photos), resembling those on Cretodus.
  18. From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Undescribed shark from Toolebuc Formation, Australia. Albian in age. This tooth possesses folds along the enamel on both sides of the tooth (hard to see in photos), resembling those on Cretodus.
  19. Lower Cretaceous Teeth

    For years now I have been trying top get a better handle on the various small teeth I find in the Albian age rocks of Central Texas. I have A number of different forms. Finsley, 1996, describes a single genus Uranoplosus as "Lower Cretaceous, Duck Creek/Fort Worth Fms". I have another publication "Lower Vertebrate Faunas of the Trinity Division in North-Central Texas, J.T. Thurmond, 1974, that lists many other genera (not Uranoplosus). But these two associated teeth are a bit different. Note the rather hooked and tapered shape. Anyone ever encountered something similar or can suggest another reference or two? The specimen is from Unit 3, Upper Member of the Glen Rose Formation (Albian) of Kendall County, Texas.
  20. Hey folks maybe you can help me out. Especially the European collectors. Here in Texas we have historically had several species of Tetragramma listed as occurring in the Fredericksburg Group (Albian) that are possibly synonymous. For those of us who collect here in Central Texas there never seemed to be any doubts about what was a Tetragramma malbosii versus a T. taffi. T. taffi are always larger and seem quite distinct from T. malbosii. (see my two examples) But in 2016 William Morgan wrote the Collector's Guide to Texas Cretaceous Echinoids (Schiffer Publ.) and in it he lists T. malbosii as having precedence, suggesting that they are just not as full grown as taffi. He sites the work of Smith & Wright, 1993. I know T. malbosii is found in Europe. What about T. taffi? What does a very large European T. malbosii look like? The one I am using as an example is the largest one I have but it is still not as large as the T. taffi and doesn't have nearly the same number of tubercles in the interamb. Your thoughts, opinions, observations, etc.??? And if anyone can point me to a link or a PDF of the following paper I would greatly appreciate it and could reward with a nice Texas echionoid... British Cretaceous echinoids. Part 3, Stirodonta 2 (Hemicidaroida, Arbacioida and Phymosomatoida, part 1) Author: Andrew B Smith; C W Wright; Palaeontographical Society (Great Britain) Publisher: London : Palaeontographical Society, [1993] Series: Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society, v. 146, no. 593. Tetragramma taffi (Cragin, 1893) Tetragramma malbosii (Agassiz & Desor, 1846)
  21. From the album Texas Echinoids, ERose

    One of the small rare ones
  22. From the album Texas Echinoids, ERose

    Probably the best specimen I personally ever found of this elusive species.
  23. Polydiadema travisensis Smith & Rader

    From the album Texas Echinoids, ERose

    They hide amongst the more common Loriolia
  24. Albian ammonites

    last weekend on our field trip where we usually search for cenomanian ammonites we also found a few phosphate ammonites on the beach that were washed out on the beach from the lower albian layers. most of them were only fragments or encrusted with phosphate, but I managed to prep few of them with very good results: the specimen on the bottom of the picture: Anahoplites planus Hoplites sp. Euhoplites ochetonus
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