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Found 138 results

  1. https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/06/oldest-frogs-fossils-amber-cretaceous-dinosaurs-science/ https://phys.org/news/2018-06-amber-fossils-oldest-evidence-frogs.html
  2. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/uok-f1m061318.php
  3. The things I would like to accomplish are; 1. Find Amber 2. Find an Arrow Head 3. Find a gold nugget
  4. My wife obtained this in China about 10-15 years ago. It was said to be from Tibet?? Can anyone here tell us more about it? It weighs 5.6 lbs. It's 10" tall and 5 1/2" across at the widest point. The insect is 2 1/2" across.
  5. no mean feet

    1,7 Mb 1646_Haug_180331.pdf there are uglier fossils around,and less well preserved ones...
  6. Hello together, i found this Baltic Amber with a Gecko and i am not sure with the authenticity. The description from the seller is very short: 322 gram. 8x12cm. 4cm thick. Genuine piece not plastic or resin but genuine Baltic Amber. With a gecko inside. For me the amber on the untreated side looks real. What worries me is the gecko and the big size of the amber. The gecko is almost perfect in the middle and is also perfect preserve. I hope you can hlp me? kind Regards, Michael
  7. New Amber Photography Setup

    A while back I had posted asking about amber photography. Well, after a lot of research, and some expensive upgrades, I finally figured out a good setup. I am using a Cannon Rebel, with a 200mm lens, a few adapters, and infinity objective lens. The whole setup is mounted to an automated stacking rail and connected to my computer. I will usually take 100-250 photos per inclusion, and then stack them with a stacking software (Zerene Stacker). The end result depends a lot on the quality of the inclusion itself, as well as the clarity and shape of the amber piece, and the position of the inclusion inside it. But with a good piece of amber, I am extremely pleased with the results.
  8. Stuff of Nightmares

    So a little while back I had the fun of coming into a bunch of Baltic amber with inclusions. I pretty much just looked at the bag of pieces and said, "Wow, that's pretty neat!" Then I promptly set them down on one of my display cases ...and proceeded to forget almost entirely about their existence. Tonight my son and I decided to bust out our cheap-o USB microscope to see just what kind of inclusions we had. The photo quality is abysmal to say the least, but one series of photos we took contains what I am entirely convinced is not only the stuff of nightmares, but also must be nothing other than the larval form of Cthulhu. I am posting this in the ID section not because I expect someone to be able to ID it, but rather in the off chance that someone might just happen to know what it is. ID or not, I will go to sleep at night knowing that this critter is locked safely away in amber, and is thus not capable of feasting on my fluids while I slumber.
  9. Feather in amber from Burma

    These are feathers in amber from Burma what feathers could they belong too primeval bird, dinosaurs or something else ?
  10. ~20% of an insect in Indonesian amber

    Hello everyone. My main area of focus is gems, but sometimes I run into fossil material, and this was one I was hoping I could ask about. I bought a sack of dark Indonesian amber a couple of years back, and after slicing and polishing a few I came across this. It appears to be part of an insect, though badly beat up. I'd have concluded it was just suggestively-shaped vegetable matter if it weren't for the 'leg', but it looks fairly leggy to me? I know this is a lot to ask from a tiny bit of data, but is it possible this is an insect, or am I reading too much into a bit of twig? And if an insect, can they be identified from fingerprints? Unfortunately this material rarely comes with a very specific locale attached. If I remember right Indonesian amber in general is miocene with a wide range of ages. Field of view ~4mm Field of view ~2mm I'd have preferred oblique lighting but the green fluorescence of the amber hides the inclusions.
  11. Fossil in amber baltic

    Hi everyone, what animal is it? It looks like a gecko, 2mm long. this is the best picture
  12. Skin Scale of Leaf?

    This amber came in a lot from Latvia. I noticed two pieces of something, fairly large in a 1.5cm x 0.5 cm piece of amber. My pics are a bit out of focus but you can see a pigment pattern of something like skin, scale or perhaps it is a leaf with a brown/pink and black pattern on it. I think it is the skin or scale of some type of creature. What do you think? Can anyone help? Jimmy
  13. Green Leaf, Red Pollen in Amber?

    Hi Its Jimmy Can anyone tell me is it possible for red pollen and green leaves to be preserved in amber? Here are the pics I took today. Any comments are much appreciated. I guess I am wondering if it still has color perhaps it still could have DNA? Jimmy
  14. The amber from Myanmar is full of amazing fossils https://phys.org/news/2018-02-remarkable-spider-tail-amber-million.html
  15. Coty/Garrouste/Nel et al: Ant/Termite syninclusion NICE
  16. Hello Dear Friends, I just want to show how small treasures in super small Baltic ambers we can find. Polyxenidae, 3.5mm in very good condition. Ultra small amber but specimen inside is perfect ! Amber size is crazy small 6mm / 6mm / 4mm. I have huge problem with uploading pictures. Any idea why ? Happy new year to all ! Artur
  17. ID required for fossilized mineral (possibly amber)

    This fossil is not organic unlike my other fossils. But I believe it to be a Amber piece. Some people in my other posts thought it might be some other material, so what do you think? Since I firmly believe that this is Amber.
  18. Coprolite in burmite?

    Hi Is this mammal coprolite ?
  19. snail in burmite?

    Hi Is this snail? I bid him for 6,99 $ with the schipped
  20. Dracula ticks in amber tell ancient blood-sucking tale By Helen Briggs, BBC News, December 12, 2017 http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42327784 Feather-Gripping Tick Trapped in Amber Dined on Dinos By Mindy Weisberger, December 12, 2017 https://www.livescience.com/61175-tick-in-amber-dined-on-dinos.html Enrique Peñalver, Antonio Arillo, Xavier Delclòs, David Peris, David A. Grimaldi, Scott R. Anderson, Paul C. Nascimbene, and Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente, 2017 Parasitised feathered dinosaurs as revealed by Cretaceous amber assemblages Nature Communications 8, Article number: 1924 (2017) doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01550-z https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-01550-z Dr Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente http://www.oum.ox.ac.uk/research/ricardo_perez_de_la_fuente.htm Yours, Paul H.
  21. I recently obtained this piece of amber, which was described as being from Myanmar, and therefore of cretaceous age. I got it very cheaply, I'd say (from a well known auction site), and this led another collector to rather rudely assert that it was fake. I have no reason to assume that it is fake, but at the same time, I'm having trouble proving that it's authentic. When I poke it with a hot needle, the needle makes an impression but doesn't slice straight through it. Dark grey smoke rose from it, which didn't smell of plastic. When I rub it vigorously with a soft cloth, it gives off a mild resinous aroma, but doesn't get sticky. It floats in salty water, in the same way as my Dominican amber does (my Baltic amber slowly sank, but I suspect I didn't have enough salt in the water). I haven't been able to get it to hold a static charge, but then I can't with any of my amber, so I must be doing that all wrong. I wouldn't normally post most of these pictures, because all but one qualify as photographic failures, but I've since re-polished the surfaces for future photography (my spare-room studio being out of action at present). Note a seed (?) of some kind just above the antenna, near the top, and some kind of larva or something to the left of the millipede. That looks like a tiny beetle on the left hand side of this one. General inclusions, including bubbles and an insect 'riding' on one, centre-right. One of the pseudoscorpions. There are various other inclusions too, including another pseudoscorpion and one tiny spider. I don't see any way in which this is an out-and-out fake (e.g. plastic). So that leaves the possibility that it's authentic, or copal, or that it's amber with the insects inserted afterwards. I'm very doubtful of the later, because they are randomly placed in the amber and I don't see any signs of tampering. That would seem like a lot of effort for something sold for £35/$45. It doesn't seem to have any of those little oak hair things that you get in Baltic amber. Not sure whether cretaceous amber, or copal, have those or not. I'd welcome any thoughts on this. Thanks.
  22. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Burmese Amber, Fossil Insect Inclusion, Caddisfly group and a Spider Kachin State, Burma Cretaceous - Cenomanian Age 98.79 ± 0.62 Million Years ago Burmese amber — Cretaceous biota fossilized in prehistoric amber that's found within present day Myanmar (Burma) of Southeast Asia. The caddisflies, or order Trichoptera, are a group of insects with aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults. There are approximately 14,500 described species, most of which can be divided into the suborders Integripalpia and Annulipalpia on the basis of the adult mouthparts. Integripalpian larvae construct a portable casing to protect themselves as they move around looking for food, while Annulipalpian larvae make themselves a fixed retreat in which they remain, waiting for food to come to them. Spiders (order Araneae) are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. As of November 2015, at least 45,700 spider species, and 113 families have been recorded by taxonomists. Although the fossil record of spiders is considered poor, almost 1000 species have been described from fossils. Because spiders' bodies are quite soft, the vast majority of fossil spiders have been found preserved in amber. The oldest known amber that contains fossil arthropods dates from 130 million years ago in the Early Cretaceous period. In addition to preserving spiders' anatomy in very fine detail, pieces of amber show spiders mating, killing prey, producing silk and possibly caring for their young. In a few cases, amber has preserved spiders' egg sacs and webs, occasionally with prey attached; the oldest fossil web found so far is 100 million years old. Earlier spider fossils come from a few lagerstätten, places where conditions were exceptionally suited to preserving fairly soft tissues. Split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda/Arthropoda Class: Insecta/Arachnida Order: Trichoptera/Araneae
  23. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Burmese Amber, Fossil Insect Inclusion, Caddisfly group and a Spider Kachin State, Burma Cretaceous - Cenomanian Age 98.79 ± 0.62 Million Years ago Burmese amber — Cretaceous biota fossilized in prehistoric amber that's found within present day Myanmar (Burma) of Southeast Asia. The caddisflies, or order Trichoptera, are a group of insects with aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults. There are approximately 14,500 described species, most of which can be divided into the suborders Integripalpia and Annulipalpia on the basis of the adult mouthparts. Integripalpian larvae construct a portable casing to protect themselves as they move around looking for food, while Annulipalpian larvae make themselves a fixed retreat in which they remain, waiting for food to come to them. Spiders (order Araneae) are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. As of November 2015, at least 45,700 spider species, and 113 families have been recorded by taxonomists. Although the fossil record of spiders is considered poor, almost 1000 species have been described from fossils. Because spiders' bodies are quite soft, the vast majority of fossil spiders have been found preserved in amber. The oldest known amber that contains fossil arthropods dates from 130 million years ago in the Early Cretaceous period. In addition to preserving spiders' anatomy in very fine detail, pieces of amber show spiders mating, killing prey, producing silk and possibly caring for their young. In a few cases, amber has preserved spiders' egg sacs and webs, occasionally with prey attached; the oldest fossil web found so far is 100 million years old. Earlier spider fossils come from a few lagerstätten, places where conditions were exceptionally suited to preserving fairly soft tissues. Split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda/Arthropoda Class: Insecta/Arachnida Order: Trichoptera/Araneae
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Burmese Amber, Fossil Insect Inclusion, Caddisfly group and a Spider Kachin State, Burma Cretaceous - Cenomanian Age 98.79 ± 0.62 Million Years ago Burmese amber — Cretaceous biota fossilized in prehistoric amber that's found within present day Myanmar (Burma) of Southeast Asia. The caddisflies, or order Trichoptera, are a group of insects with aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults. There are approximately 14,500 described species, most of which can be divided into the suborders Integripalpia and Annulipalpia on the basis of the adult mouthparts. Integripalpian larvae construct a portable casing to protect themselves as they move around looking for food, while Annulipalpian larvae make themselves a fixed retreat in which they remain, waiting for food to come to them. Spiders (order Araneae) are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. As of November 2015, at least 45,700 spider species, and 113 families have been recorded by taxonomists. Although the fossil record of spiders is considered poor, almost 1000 species have been described from fossils. Because spiders' bodies are quite soft, the vast majority of fossil spiders have been found preserved in amber. The oldest known amber that contains fossil arthropods dates from 130 million years ago in the Early Cretaceous period. In addition to preserving spiders' anatomy in very fine detail, pieces of amber show spiders mating, killing prey, producing silk and possibly caring for their young. In a few cases, amber has preserved spiders' egg sacs and webs, occasionally with prey attached; the oldest fossil web found so far is 100 million years old. Earlier spider fossils come from a few lagerstätten, places where conditions were exceptionally suited to preserving fairly soft tissues. Split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda/Arthropoda Class: Insecta/Arachnida Order: Trichoptera/Araneae
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