Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'ammolite'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 29 results

  1. Ammolite with trilobite??

    Ammolite with trilobite? It can be real?
  2. We found a variety of nice fossils on a recent visit to the cliffs on the St Mary River in Southern Alberta. For early January in Canada, it was like a summer day. It took me about 15 minutes to find a 100 pound concretion and another 20 to dig it out. Then a great deal of grunting and groaning to get it up the cliff on my back. It turned out to be a gem ball. More pixs of the gem when I clean it. We also found a nice placenteris meeki suture fossil, lots of gem, and one interclare. The pictures show the cliff, uncovering the fossil and a few other shots of finds. other pixs follow
  3. Purchased at a very low price. Is this a real ammonite/ammolite or fabricated?
  4. I got these ammonites a few months ago and I was wondering if I should put any kind of protective coating on them. I have them in storage now. When I display them they will not be near any direct sunlight but I was still worried the color may fade plus the shell is very delicate. I’d prefer to leave them natural but if there is a chance they will fade then I’d prefer to put some kind of protective coating on them. Will they fade over time even if they are not in sunlight? should I coat them or leave them as is? If I so what is the best product to use and how should I apply it? Thanks
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Natural Iridescent Ammonite Ammolite Specimen Fossil Madagascar, probably Mahajanga Province Early Cretaceous period - Early Aptian (about 115 million years old) Cleoniceras is a rather involute, high-whorled hoplitid from the Lower to basal Middle Albian of Europe, Madagascar, and Transcaspian region. The shell has a generally small umbilicus, arched to acute venter, and typically at some growth stage, falcoid ribs that spring in pairs from umbilical tubercles, usually disappearing on the outer whorls. Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda. These molluscs are more closely related to living coleoids (i.e., octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish) than they are to shelled nautiloids such as the living Nautilus species. The earliest ammonites appear during the Devonian, and the last species died out during the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Ammonites are excellent index fossils, and it is often possible to link the rock layer in which a particular species or genus is found to specific geologic time periods. Their fossil shells usually take the form of planispirals, although there were some helically spiraled and nonspiraled forms (known as heteromorphs). The name "ammonite", from which the scientific term is derived, was inspired by the spiral shape of their fossilized shells, which somewhat resemble tightly coiled rams' horns. Pliny the Elder (d. 79 AD near Pompeii) called fossils of these animals ammonis cornua ("horns of Ammon") because the Egyptian god Ammon (Amun) was typically depicted wearing ram's horns. Often the name of an ammonite genus ends in -ceras, which is Greek for "horn". Ammolite is an opal-like organic gemstone found primarily along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains of North America. It is made of the fossilized shells of ammonites, which in turn are composed primarily of aragonite, the same mineral contained in nacre, with a microstructure inherited from the shell. It is one of few biogenic gemstones; others include amber and pearl. Ammolite comes from the fossil shells of the Upper Cretaceous disk-shaped ammonites Placenticeras meeki and Placenticeras intercalare, and (to a lesser degree) the cylindrical baculite, Baculites compressus. Ammonites were cephalopods, that thrived in tropical seas until becoming extinct along with the dinosaurs at the end of the Mesozoic era. Other fossils, such as many found in Madagascar and Alberta, display iridescence. These iridescent ammonites are often of gem quality (ammolite) when polished. In no case would this iridescence have been visible during the animal's life; additional shell layers covered it. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: Ammonitida Family: Hoplitidae Genus: Cleoniceras
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Natural Iridescent Ammonite Ammolite Specimen Fossil Madagascar, probably Mahajanga Province Early Cretaceous period - Early Aptian (about 115 million years old) Cleoniceras is a rather involute, high-whorled hoplitid from the Lower to basal Middle Albian of Europe, Madagascar, and Transcaspian region. The shell has a generally small umbilicus, arched to acute venter, and typically at some growth stage, falcoid ribs that spring in pairs from umbilical tubercles, usually disappearing on the outer whorls. Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda. These molluscs are more closely related to living coleoids (i.e., octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish) than they are to shelled nautiloids such as the living Nautilus species. The earliest ammonites appear during the Devonian, and the last species died out during the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Ammonites are excellent index fossils, and it is often possible to link the rock layer in which a particular species or genus is found to specific geologic time periods. Their fossil shells usually take the form of planispirals, although there were some helically spiraled and nonspiraled forms (known as heteromorphs). The name "ammonite", from which the scientific term is derived, was inspired by the spiral shape of their fossilized shells, which somewhat resemble tightly coiled rams' horns. Pliny the Elder (d. 79 AD near Pompeii) called fossils of these animals ammonis cornua ("horns of Ammon") because the Egyptian god Ammon (Amun) was typically depicted wearing ram's horns. Often the name of an ammonite genus ends in -ceras, which is Greek for "horn". Ammolite is an opal-like organic gemstone found primarily along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains of North America. It is made of the fossilized shells of ammonites, which in turn are composed primarily of aragonite, the same mineral contained in nacre, with a microstructure inherited from the shell. It is one of few biogenic gemstones; others include amber and pearl. Ammolite comes from the fossil shells of the Upper Cretaceous disk-shaped ammonites Placenticeras meeki and Placenticeras intercalare, and (to a lesser degree) the cylindrical baculite, Baculites compressus. Ammonites were cephalopods, that thrived in tropical seas until becoming extinct along with the dinosaurs at the end of the Mesozoic era. Other fossils, such as many found in Madagascar and Alberta, display iridescence. These iridescent ammonites are often of gem quality (ammolite) when polished. In no case would this iridescence have been visible during the animal's life; additional shell layers covered it. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: Ammonitida Family: Hoplitidae Genus: Cleoniceras
  7. Hello, I purchased this pendant online, and I am questioning its authenticity! It came in an ammolite korite white box. It looks just like a pendant photo I found on their website, but there's a stamp label Bronze RP at the top of the pendant. The last time I checked, they produce jewelry in silver and gold. Does the stamp mean it's made of bronze? Is this authentic ammolite? Thanks!
  8. Hello, I recently purchased this Canadian ammolite pendant on eBay, and I'm questioning its authenticity? It looks dark at certain angles. It only looks resplendent when exposed to a significant amount of light. thanks
  9. Ammolite Boom in Alberta

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/ammolite-mine-expansion-canada-gems-1.3993105 (although I don't know how I feel about processing lovely ammonites into other things )
  10. Best Places to buy Gem Ammolite?

    Hello, I am looking for reputable places to buy gem ammolite, specifically gem ammolite with a bluer color. A user had previously suggested to me two stores but I wasn't really seeing anything that caught my eye. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you.
  11. Hello is this ammolite real? The information I have says it was found in the Bear Paw formation in Alberta Canada.
  12. Ammolite Pendant (Placenticeras meeki)

    From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    A gift I got for my mom
  13. From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    75 - 72 mya, Bearpaw Formation, Rocky Mountains, Canada,
  14. We found a couple of big ammonites encased in rock and have no idea how to extract without damaging the shell. any ideas?
  15. I have fragmented ammonites that has been glued together. Could someone suggest a kind of paint with additives? to get that irridescent pearly look. Thanks
  16. From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    Assorted collection of North American and Canadian ammonites and ammolites
  17. Placenticeras meeki whole 01

    From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    Genus - Placenticeras meeki Locality - Pierre Shale Formation, South Dakota, USA Geological Age - Cretaceous
  18. Dragon Skin Ammolite

    From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    Dragon-skin pattern Ammolite from fossil ammonite Locality - Alberta, Canada Geological Age - Cretaceous
  19. North American Ammonites Collection

    From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    Assorted collection of North American Ammonites and Canadian Ammolites
  20. Assorted Ammonites Collection 03

    From the album My Cabinet of Curiosity & Geological Art

    Assorted collection of ammonites from various geological ages & localities
  21. Assorted Ammonites Collection 01

    From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    Assorted collection of ammonites & ammolites from Canada, Europe & Africa
  22. British Ammolite Collection

    From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    Collection of British ammolite ammonites from Watchet & Somerset, UK Caloceras johnstoni & Psiloceras planobis
  23. Ammolites & Ammonites Collection

    From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    assorted collection of ammolites and iridescent & pyritized ammonites
  24. From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    Placenticeras meeki (hand sample) Age: Cretaceous Locality: South Alberta, Canada
  25. From the album Ammonites & Ammolites

    Placenticeras meeki (hand sample) Age: Cretaceous Locality: South Alberta, Canada
×