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Found 1,183 results

  1. Hi all! A bit of development to the Frozen fossils topic. It's the same Moskva river Bronnitsy Oxfordian, but some 5km upstream, where you can find a bit younger layer of Amoeboceras serratum ammonites (earlier it was Amoeboceras alternoides layer/zone). The difference is mainly in the keel, it's less pronounced. The layer is accessible only in winter. Dont expect it to be breathtaking, the preservation is unfortunately worse and the fossils are more scarce. The shore:
  2. Hello! i posted a different real or fake question earlier (brittle starfish) and was told It was fake and to keep looking for other gifts. It was suggested that it’s better to be safe than sorry and to post other items I’m interested in. Since i really appreciated the input last time, I’m here to ask again This time it’s a zoom in of an ammonite slab (holzmaden shale from Germany). It looks real to me but I just wanted to check. Thanks for all the help in gift searching!!
  3. I will trade these fossils for one well preserved European goniatite or European triassic ammonite (specimen with 5 to 8 cm preferentially) because that kind of specimen is lack in my teaching collection. Note the Anorthopygus orbicularis is not a common species and, apart the incomplete test, has an exceptional detailed preservation, rarely seen. Best regards, Ricardo Traded
  4. Ammonite ID

    Hello. I have this large black ammonite acquired from a man who lived in Brazil. Supposedly this ammo is from Peru, but I do not know any other info on it. There are so many ammo types it makes ones head spin trying to identify the details. Any help here would be appreciated. Thanks!
  5. Fun North Sulphur River Texas hunt today. The Plesisoar podial is huge. The mosasuar jaw section has teeth hidden under the red matrix. The big mosasaur cervical vert is in great shape.
  6. Hi there, I'm working at the moment on cataloguing my collection. 98% or so has been self collected over the years. Lately i've cataloguing my fossils from "les Vaches noires" cliffs in normandy / France. Im not finished yet, but i think i should share. So heres my flickr galery "les Vaches Noires " : https://flic.kr/s/aHsmKUCQse i hope you will enjoy.
  7. Ammonite help plz

    My dad happened to be in Tucson during the fossil show and grabbed a neat sliced ammonite in a box simply labeled “made in Madagascar” (he knows I’m a sucker for any fossil that had a geode develop in a cavity). I’d like to know a bit more about it, but the info I’ve been able to find about the ammonites of Madagascar is pretty limited and makes identifying pretty hard. My best guess is Desmoceras sp. can anyone be more specific or correct me?
  8. Sinemurian ammonite from Nevada

    This ammonite was found in association with Tmaegoceras nudaries and Coroniceras luningense, indicative of the Mullerense Subzone of the Involutum Zone of the early Sinemurian. The venter is compressed and rounded on early whorls but becomes subquadrate on the outermost preserved whorl, with the strong ribs extending completely over it. Any suggestions as to its genus are most welcome!
  9. What ammonite is this?

    Location unknown. Can’t give much info.
  10. It’s 5-7 inches big. Iguanodon toe bone is next to it.
  11. Greetings kind people, I am a complete novice in the field of fossil collecting. Kindly bear with me. My objective for collecting fossils: I want to learn paleontology work. I want to observe the fossils under a microscope, understand their body structure, their food habits.... Basically get a *whole story of the fossil* which I own, something that paleontologists do (I also want to explore all the methods that paleontologists use to study fossil and recreate them at home). So any fossil that will enable me to learn more about itself, I'd surely buy that. And also fossils which are more closer to actuality, rather than rare or good looking fossils. So any fossil that reveals more information is favoured over rare or good-looking fossils So here are my questions: 1) I'm trying to buy a spinosaur tooth. The seller is selling one spinosaur tooth which is red in colour for a higher price compared to a spinosaur tooth which looks almost like a rock. So is the red colour tooth more authentic or more valuable etc? Or is it just the same? My objective is to study those fossils under microscope. So if the red spinosaur tooth will provide more information, I'd buy that. 2) I see some dinosaur tooth still having some enamel. How is this possible? I mean shouldn't enamel be replaced by minerals too? Or is the enamel the only thing that is intact? If it is intact does it mean I'm holding a tooth which might have bit another dinosaur moments before it died and I can see the traces of that activity when I observe under the microscope? 3) I've seen polished ammonites which were split open. They carried a lot of information within, compared to unpolished ammonite. Which among those two types would reveal more information about the ammonite itself? Or which one should I go for, in general? 4)I am also planning to buy amber fossils. Some pointers and what to look for and what to keep away from would be appreciated. 5) Lastly, trilobites. How are trilobite fossils so well preserved? I've seen reedops protruding out of the rock like it's actually alive. But I read something about cast fossils and enhancements. So if I buy a reedops trilobite, does it mean it's been remade using plaster etc, or is it just as it is? Please bear in mind that I want to own fossils which closely resembles actuality Thank you so much for bearing with my silly doubts .I just want to educate myself and be an amateur paleontologist, studying fossils from home. Have a lovely day! P.s- I can upload some pictures and website links if need be.
  12. I follow the Moskva...

    ...Down to Gorky( Brateyevsky) park... Hi all! It is time to introduce you to the famous Panderi zone of the Moscow fossils. It is named after Dorsoplanites panderi ammonite (middle Volgian/Tithonian, Upper Jurassic), which in turn got its name from Heinz Christian Pander. It consists of numerous cast iron-like (black, heavy, solid but fragile) separate concretions containing mostly ammonites and bivalves. The fossils from the Panderi layer are grim, black, rough and depressive (in line with this winter).The zone is present throughout Moscow but becomes most accessible in the south-east. There are at least 5 spots along the river where you can collect them.
  13. Help with ammonite identification

    Hi there, I found a fossil trace that appears to be from an ammonite on our west Texas ranch and what appears to be dinosaur tracks a few miles away as well. Can anyone identify more if this an ammonite trace and what kind from this photo? Thank you in advance.
  14. Hello everyone! At this point, it's been a long time since I've found any of these so I wanted to show my collection of Wenonah slabs or 'plates'. These slabs were found in the same area over the course of a few years and is a collaboration of a lot of fun trips with friends. The majority of them were found by me and my brother, Shane @shajzer64 in 2016 but a few others have dug with me in this (mostly unproductive) location looking for and finding these - thank you to everyone involved! The slabs are all the same thickness and preservation; I was actually able to put a few together but as a whole, I think most were in the stream for too long to connect them. They are mostly shell and gastropod imprints but include ghost shrimp burrows, an Ischyrhiza rostral, shark teeth, an echinoid, an ammonite, a fish spine (we think), scaphopods, and more. I'm not positive the sponges are associated with this exact project but the preservation looks the same so I included them too (that could go for the ammonite too). If anyone is interested in seeing a particular slab, let me know and I'll get a picture. I'm pretty happy with my new display so I hope you enjoy it! -Frank @Carl @non-remanié @Darktooth@Jeffrey P@Trevor@The Jersey Devil
  15. Ammonite ID

    Another little ammonite I have had for years. No location information unfortunately. Any ideas?
  16. Ammonite ID

    Found a rather large and partially well preserved ammonite in ammonitico rosso dating early to middle Toarcian in the mountains of Epirus, Greece. Partially preserved because the other side was exposed and totally flattened. I am actually puzzled by the flattened state of the inner whorl as opposed to the outer whorl and center which appear intact. The shine is due to the paralloid-acetone mix i coated the specimen with, to prevent further deterioration. Would appreciate any suggestions to the species.
  17. Ammonite ID (Lyme Regis)

    Hi everyone, I found this ammonite recently on the beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in England and was hoping someone might be able to tell me what species or genus this is? It is from the Charmouth Mudstone Formation, and is about 190 million years old. If additional photos are required i can get more. The diameter of the ammonite is approx. 6 cm. Thank you!
  18. Here is an ammonite which I found at Port Mulgrave on the Yorkshire Coast in 2017. This is Jurassic aged. My ammonite knowledge is not great, but I think this is Dactylioceras commune. These are very abundant on the Yorkshire coast, so I don’t expect anything uncommon for this. Anything is of interest, especially things which are abundant in your collecting area but not often seen for sale online in the UK, for example Mazon creek Jellyfish. I mainly collect Carboniferous fossils, but I will consider fossils of all ages. Thanks, Daniel
  19. Polish Ammonites

    Looking for assistance with the identification of these ammonites from Poland (either Niegowoniec or Odrodzieniec). Age is late Jurassic; Oxfordian. Orthosphinctes? Perisphinctes? The best that I can tell, the ribs on the big one are only bifurcate. Anyone have an idea from which formation they may have come? @Ludwigia
  20. Ammonite from Germany

    Hello. This is ammonite what I have. It from Germany from Upper Jurassic. I do not know the detailed place name. What's this scientific name?
  21. Unknown Ammonites

    Ralph @Nimravis generously gave me these Ammonites. I think he bought them at a garage sale. There was no data with them. I have zero experience with ammonites. I am hoping someone will be able to put a genus name on one or more of them or even venture a guess as to from where they may have come and what time period. Does that matrix / assemblage look familiar to anyone? One appears to be a heteromorph. I think I see Inoceramus in there. Maybe Cretaceous? Texas? They are all the same color (differences in color between the pieces in the photos is due to different lighting). Scale is in cm/mm.
  22. Ammonite from Madagascar

    Hello. This is an ammonite from Madagascar. I don't know the scientific name of this. Are both the same type? Please tell me the scientific name of this.
  23. Ammonite from Madagascar

    Hello. This is the ammonite I have. Are these names Aioloceras besairiei? Are these all the same type? Since I am Japanese, I use Google Translate to write this sentence.
  24. Hello everyone! Merry Christmas! I learned something interesting from my own observations of an Ammonite fossil I recently got. It involves mathematics, mainly the Golden Ratio. For those that dont know, the Golden Ratio is a constant. Difficult to describe in words. Maybe someone else will say what it is for me. It is equal to approximately 1.618. Anyway, here is a picture of the Ammonite I found with lines over it. As you can see, the lines, (which go with the length of the Ammonite Spiral,) follow the golden ratio. 1.29 is 1.618 times smaller than 2.1. 2.1 is 1.618 times smaller than 3.39. Finally, 3.39 is 1.618 times smaller than 5.5, the length of the Ammonite. You will also notice that the first and second, 1.29 and 2.1, equal the third, 3.39. The second and third, 2.1 and 3.39, equal the 4th, 5.5. If the Ammonite spiral went on into infinity, it would ALWAYS follow this ratio, the Golden Ratio. This is very interesting. Well, thats it. Thats what I learned today. I hope you enjoy it. Jared
  25. Madagascar Ammonite ID

    I purchased this ammonite several years ago but forgot to write down its classification. My guess is that it is originally from Madagascar. Any help with an identification would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
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