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Found 60 results

  1. Shark tooth ID

    Hi guys I have an angustidens tooth (on the left) and a Chubutensis Tooth (on the right) I am finding it hard to separate the 2 as different species as they look very similar, the only difference I notice is the roots are different, are there any key factors to look out for with identifying the 2. Thanks
  2. First chub tooth

    Hey guys I purchased my first ever Chubutensis tooth a love it! I don’t no a lot about the species and would like to know more, this chub tooth has big side cusp and would like to know if it’s a transition tooth or just how this tooth is as it’s quite large (7cm width 9cm length) thanks
  3. Our favorite South Carolina paleontologist @Boessegot in the news (again) for finding a mega shark nursery. https://www.sciencealert.com/a-24-million-year-old-megashark-nursery-discovered-in-south-carolina
  4. In between this trip report and the last, I have moved from Houston to Columbia, where I am studying biology at the University of South Carolina, so now I have the opportunitiy to take day trips down to Charleston and Summerville to go fossil hunting, which I am very much looking forwards to doing some more of sometime soon. I made my first trip since moving in on Saturday afternoon to a little creek in Summerville I last hit roughly two and a half months ago. You can see the fruits of that particular trip here: Now, I'm pretty satisfied with the results of this trip, but something important to take away from this, especially for those of you interested in hunting the Summerville area, is that I had both my younger brothers in tow for my July trip to the same creek, and even after 2.5 months and a hurricane, I'm not even getting a sixth of what we pulled out of that creek in July. I hope this illustrates to you just how slowly these Summerville creeks replenish. As has been said many times, if you're traveling to SC to find fossils, your best bet for a good experience is going to be just paying the money to go on a guided fossiling trip with a company like Charleston Fossil Adventures, Palmetto Fossil Excursions, or Charleston Outdoor Adventures. On this trip I sifted gravel for most of the smaller teeth, and the big stuff I found looking through the gravel banks. I really like the colors on that beat up angustidens I found, and that vert is the largest shark vert I've found. I also got a nice Hemipristis lower and a nice bull shark tooth. I'm looking at heading down to Charleston in the next week or two, so expect a post about that sometime soon.
  5. Megalodon Evolutionary Set

    I received the final piece needed for my Megalodon evolutionary set today! The hardest tooth to obtain by far was the Carcharocles mugodzharicus, and I would like to thank @MarcoSr for his help with that search as well as the generosity with which he shared knowledge about it. I'll mention that I acknowledge the various debates around species naming and went with the ones I believed to be the best fit. I kindly request that we not get into it on this thread.
  6. Got a pretty decent haul out of Summerville on Tuesday, finally found a creek spot that was halfway decent. Lots of little broken Meg chunks, but the big tooth remains elusive. I did find a nice angustidens, though, which is in excellent shape for a creek tooth of that size. I put the specimens I could use some help identifying in the upper right hand corner of the first picture. I know the top two are mammal teeth of some sort, pretty sure the right one is either horse or camel, but I have no clue about the one on the left. Below them are what I assume is the remains of some sort of coral, and on the bottom is a small mystery tooth in matrix and a strange piece of fossilized something. I would really appreciate it if any of yall could let me know what some of this stuff is. I plan on heading back to this site tomorrow or the next day because we just had a decent storm blow through, so stay tuned!
  7. Insane S.C. fossil hunt!!!!

    Hi everyone, last Friday I went on a fossil hunting trip in S.C. with palmetto fossil excursions, there was a short hike out to the site, it was a beautiful day with an average temp of 85 degrees!!! when we were walking up to the creek area where we were hunting and we found half of what would have been a beautiful 3 1/2 inch meg tooth!!!! less than 15 minutes after that my brother found a massive blade of a mako, less then 10 feet away from the blade of the mako I found a nearly flawless posterior and several other angustidens including one with insane colors, a worn whale vert, an awesome hemi with beautiful colors, and 3 fused shark verts!!! after a short lunch break, me and my brother went to a different spot where I found 2 1 1/2 inch Isurus desori teeth and my brother found a angustiden in matrix, a hastalis and the best desori tooth from the trip all within 7 feet of each other!!!! while our dad was doing the dig tour, he found 2 megs the larger one is a little below the five inch mark, and the shorter one is around 3 1/2 inches!!! overall it was an awesome day!!!!! I’ll post pictures of the best finds alone soon. and there was only one water moccasin spotted!!!
  8. Shark tooth ID

    Hi! So I was browsing for some shark teeth when I came across this bundle of 3 teeth at a very reasonable price. The teeth were listed as being 2 Otodus Obliquus teeth (smaller ones) and 1 Megalodon tooth. Now the supposed Megalodon tooth is obviously not a Meg, as it has cusps (thinking it's either an Angustidens or Auriculatus). I'm also almost certain the two other teeth are not Otodus teeth. Anyone who can safely ID these teeth?
  9. @Gizmo and I had fun day on a stream in eastern Virginia in July. After emergency renovations on my home, I was in bad need of some restorative time in the field. For about two months, the only fossil hunting I got to do was vicariously through the TFF Trip Reports I've been so focused on coprolites and other aspects of collecting that I am behind on prepping teeth and bone. However, thought I'd share some finds as-is. Below are a few highlights: The larger tooth was found in situ in the Calver formation and has some pretty spectacular feeding damage, including a triangular bite mark and serration scrapes on the enamel: Some odd turtle bits, including a humerus: An ocean sunfish beak:
  10. ANGUSTIDENS OR AURICULATIS ?

    Hi I picked up this beauty recently, I think its an Angi but I am no expert and despite reading books on fossil teeth and looking at pictures of others I cannot make my mind up, what is the difference between the Angustidens and Auriculatis, is the Auriculatis more Otodus Obiliquus looking with slight serrations while the Angustidens more Megalodon looking with side cusps ?. It is 2.6" along its longest side if this helps.
  11. Carcharocles angustidens 16

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles angustidens Wando River Charleston, South Carolina

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  12. Summerville September 14 2018

    From the album Summerville, SC Fossil Hunts

    Carcharocles angustidens Summerville, South Carolina

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  13. Got a road trip with my son coming up last week of June (Want to be at the Elon Musk Rocket Launch 6/29 if possible). Starting in Washington DC. I know there are a ton of Fossil spots along the way but I'd really like to add a decent Angustidens tooth to my collection (Something Different than Peace River, Shark Tooth Hill or Big Brook NJ). I won't be diving and don't have room to carry my sifting gear, but I don't mind putting in a full day of hunting. If anyone is interested in meeting up or share a site I'd be grateful. Thanks, Kevin
  14. Summerville June 23 2017

    From the album Summerville, SC Fossil Hunts

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  15. Summerville April 06 2018

    From the album Summerville, SC Fossil Hunts

    Carcharocles (O.) angustidens Also two barracuda teeth in a portion of jaw

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  16. Megalodon Tooth?

    Hi everyone, I just returned from a morning beach hunting trip and found what I'm thinking is a small meg. I'm not entirely sure though, because nearly every other larger tooth I've found here has been identified as angustidens. It was found on Wrightsville Beach/ Wilmington, North Carolina. I'm thinking meg because of the lack of cusps. Anyone?
  17. Hi everyone, I was just seeking a little information on the relationship between the Megalodon, Angustidens, Auriculatus, and modern Great White sharks. Clearly the modern Great Whites are the most recent subspecies, but what about before them? Was Megalodon first with each shark decreasing in size until today's Great Whites? Did Angustidens come before or after Auriculatus? Any kind of clarification would be appreciated!! Thanks
  18. I took advantage of the gorgeous weather to get in my first "serious" snorkel trip of the season today. With air temps in the high 80s and water temps in the 70s F., a nice afternoon low moon tide, and a long rainless stretch I figured conditions would be pretty good. I proceeded to my standard marine Oligocene place. I set out to make a long paddle to a new site I've had my eye on, stopping for quick surface searches at a couple of places along the way. I decided to stop at one of my old favorite spots and just stick my face in the water. Water was low, but not the lowest, clarity was good, and the water was cool enough to be refreshing. I could have wished for more direct sunlight, but perfection is seldom found in real life. The site looked so nice with the clear water I decided to park there a while. I ended up living there in that 100 meter stretch, face down, for 2.5 hours until I was shivering with numb fingertips. I passed on most of the tiny teeth, random turtle material, worn vertebrae, bivalve molds, chunkasaurs, etc. and just aimed to cover ground and pick up the nicer stuff. As usual, the really big teeth eluded me. I picked up one large turtle plastron frag, a nice gastropod steinkern, and an intriguing chunk of what I think is a femoral trochanter. I found the standard Carcharias, Isurus, Hemipristis, spp. teeth and a few heartbreaking fraglodons. What made the day most special were the lovely little 3-5 cm C. angustidens teeth that kept turning up. I ended up with a nice handful of (for me) very nice condition angustidens that made me really happy. Too bad about the lack of biggies and missing out on the new spot, but for me this was a great way to start the season. G
  19. Carcharocles angustidens 15

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles angustidens South Carolina Chandler Bridge fm.

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  20. All the time we have a reoccurring theme of a megatoothed shark tooth with no locale info being labeled as unidentifiable. You would think that those ol’scientists had some good reasons for separating the species out (other than time and place). I have been lucky enough to collect all the teeth from the middle of this line and have made some simple observations. I don’t know whether they stand to scrutiny, but I thought I’d share them. Because I really don’t know what the status of Carcharocles is, im going to use Otodus despite Carcharocles being the cooler name by far. Here it goes: Otodus Aksauticus Fig. 1 Pretty different from Otodus if you asked me. Mine comes from the Early Eocene of Maryland’s Nanjemoy formation. It is Typically early Eocene and a not a very prolific species it seems. The cusp serrations are not very fine, and the blade serrations are large (though not as large as paleocarcharodon) and irregular. May be hard to see in my specimen. This species is probably descended from Otodus obliquus Otodus auriculatus Fig. 3 I believe sokolovi and sokolowi are synonymous, they occur in a number of sites of early- or Mid-Eocene age. I am kind of confused, as I have one that matches the description (and was sold to me as a sokolovi) from Dakhla, Morocco which seems to be late eocene with some late Paleocene deposits (less likely). Take this figure with a generous helping of sodium chloride. These are the first teeth in the lineage that seem to be more common large (2-4 inch slant height it seems) than small. The serrations are slightly finer but still irregular on the blade. The cusp has both large and small serrations. This species probably evolved from Aksauticus (Otodus will be assumed from this point forward). Otodus sokolovi Fig. 2 These are from the mid- late Eocene, and seem to have some degree of regional variation. Mine is from the Late Eocene Harleyville formation of South Carolina. They still tend to keep under 4 inches. Serrations are fine and regular on the blade (because there is a bit of wear on mine it’s hard to see). Cusp serrations are fine but still get large around the point of the cusp. They are probably descended from auriculatus, and are considered by many to be one species. They are here for splitters sake. Otodus angustidens Fig. 4 Okay, so embarrassingly enough I have one good (unworn enough for meaningful automorphies to be seen) angustidens, and it’s a juvenile. I hope you’ve taken a grain of salt for this whole thing, but this one should be a nice chunky crystal. Any way, they are most common in the Oligocene (when they appear). They get almost meg-sized, about five inches is the biggest I’ve heard tell of. They have fine, regular serrations on both the blade and the cusp, only minutely larger towards the apex of the cusp. Cusps are also is moving towards the blade as well as becoming more circular as opposed to the more triangular ones possessed by earlier megatooths. Some can be very difficult to tell from auriculatus/sokolovi (from which it is likely to have evolved. Angustidens tends to have a more triangular blade then auriculatus but this is a flimsy standard and doesn't work in many cases. Mine is from the oligocene Chandler Bridge formation of South Carolina So thats it, figures below, thanks to @Nimravis for the magnifying technique. Chubs are a whole different ball game, one which I am not ready to play at the moment. I think I’ll do a thread on it some other time. hope you enjoyed, please point out any errors or additions! Fig. 1
  21. Carcharocles angustidens 14

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles angustidens Summerville, SC

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  22. Carcharocles angustidens 13

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles angustidens Summerville, SC

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  23. Carcharocles angustidens 12

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles angustidens Summerville, SC

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  24. Carcharocles angustidens 10

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles angustidens Summerville, South Carolina

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  25. The Fall Creek Crawl

    Hello everyone, since school has let go I've had an opportunity to get back in the water and do some quiet and relaxing hunting. The leaves are falling in the bucket fulls so that does tend to clog things up a bit at this time of year, but the weather has been warmer than usual and the spouse gods have been in my favor. I've had a time documenting some of the more interesting finds. I usually give the haul a good single flatbed scan to archive everything by date and then concentrate on anything interesting. Some color about, which means they haven't been sitting on the creek-bed for too long. A 'dolphin' tooth that isn't completely eaten up .. etc ... I have to say my sailing boots though have made up from their disuse since my time in California (*sigh*). It seems that the extra rubber and neoprene work well in the muck and mud, and keep my digits safe from the broken glass. They are warm on my feet too which is usually the first thing to go .... The Angustidens are always my favorite .. Most are in pieces but when you pick up one with some color or a good tip the curses about the missing cusp fade away. Small teeth with big color .. Billfish hypural from the Chandler bridge and the Ashley fm. Marl (in matrix) . I find rostrum fragments occasionally. Fish jaw part The best and least common are the teeth locked in the matrix. Most likely Ashley fm. below the Chandler bridge. The Aliopias sp. in this location are always small. Maybe the water at this spot wasn't deep enough back in the day .. Vert and tooth ... this tooth is probably my best from the creek. They can take a beating. Cheers, Brett
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