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Found 9 results

  1. Favorite Dino Fossils

    Hey guys, wasn’t sure where to put this but anyway here we go. I was wondering if any of you have or have pictures of some fossils of some of my or your favorite dinosaurs?(I know gryposuchus isn’t a Dino too ) They are the species tagged. I know they are very rare and hard to obtain but just thought I’d see. Thanks, and I look forward to seeing your collections!
  2. Ankylosaurus tooth / Hell Creek

    Hello everybody So we have this rooted tooth here: This tooth was found in Carter County, Montana / Hell Creek Formation and labled as Ankylosaurus magniventris. I just wonder if this ID is correct. Unfortunately I can't provide other pictures. I am aware of Troodons great post CLICK but still struggle with this tooth. This might be a worn tooth, but can't really see the key points Troodon pointed out in his post. Thank you for the help
  3. I found a couple pieces of what I think to be Dinosaur Bones and possibly a scute from my Uncle's property a while back in Canon City, CO. Canon City is known for Late Jurassic dinosaurs. I'm definitely not an expert, but it looks like I possibly found an Ankylosaurus scute? Can someone tell me anything about these bones? One of the bones even looks like it has bite marks or claw marks. Not sure....I could be wrong. Any info would help, thanks!
  4. Today is my last day off before I go back to work and I was supposed to spend the day making fossil starter kits. I have a cold though and I do not want the kids to think that 12 million year old shark teeth gave them a cold lol I am pretty bored so I thought I would post about our Judith River dinosaur fossils and how we are going to get discuss this formation. I am really surprised how much I am enjoying learning about these dinosaurs and this will be a formation that we spend a good bit of time on. It must have had some very productive ecosystems and there is a great diversity here to discuss. The kids will also get to see some familiar dinosaur families while learning about species that are new to them. I think during adaptation related presentations, this formation lets us get into ecological niches and discuss how two Tyrannosaurids existed as did at least two species of Dromaeosaurids and a Troodonitd plus other predators including non dinos. That is a lot of hungry mouths so niche selection and adaptations become very important. THere is also a great diversity of herbivores in this formation. I love the Ceratopsians from this formation and the diversity gives my son a lot of artistic options. We currently have one tooth but by the time we present we will have a couple more I think. This allows us to present a few species and say the teeth are not diagnostic so the teeth could have belonged to one or more really cool looking horned dinosaurs. This also gives the kids knowledge that there other Ceratopsians besides Triceratops. This will also be the point where we introduce Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are just iconic and this formation gives us the chance to really hit on adaptations. We have a Saurornitholestes tooth and will soon have a Dormaeosaurid caudal vertebra. While not assigned specifically to Dromaeosaurus, the vert will presented that way so we can talk about the differences between the two raptors. Of particular interest is the larger skull, more robust teeth, and specific wear patterns on the teeth of Dromaeosaurus. We will also have a small tooth tip from a Tyrannosaur indet. The kids will love learning about other Tyrannosaurids and I will leave it to the kids to imagine which one it belonged to. The real owner of the tooth is not important. That two existed in this formation is what is important. They must have occupied different niches plus a lot of kids may think T-Rex was the only member of that family. The last fossil I know we will have from Judith River is one of my favorites. It is an Ankylosaurus tooth and thanks to some help from TFF members, I spotted this among a few Nodosaur teeth. In our inventory, this is Ankylosaurus indet. However, in every single dinosaur presentation we do this will be Zuul and it will be a rock star. We want the kids to understand that there are many new discoveries being made and there will be a lot of new dinosaur discoveries made by THEIR generation. Everything about Zuul will be cool to kids. It is the one of the most incredible fossils ever found, armored dinosaurs are just cool, and it even has a pop culture name that a lot of kids will recognize from Ghostbusters lol Only 5 fossils but we can do A LOT of quality education with these fossils. I also have a very clear idea of the next items to find from Judith River. #1 on that list is a Dromaeosaurus tooth. A tooth gives us the perfect way of illustrating the difference between the raptors. We have two more purchases to complete before I buy again so I will save up and in the spring I start searching for that tooth. I also would love to add a hadrosaur bone from this formation and eventually I will track down a frill piece. Anyway, here a couple of the fossils... Pic 1- our Saurornitholestes tooth. Not a great picture but a really nice tooth. Pic 2- the Dormaeosaurid indet vert. Not here yet but will be right around my B-day. Pic 3- the Anky tooth. It is just a cool tooth and Zuul is a great dinosaur to teach kids about so Zuul is what this tooth is for Fossils on Wheels. Our only fossil from an armored dinosaur.
  5. Interesting find on online today, do you think it is real?
  6. Hi guys, I was wondering if this is a real Ankylosaurus scute/ plate? It comes from hell creek formation, South-Dakota, Buffelo, USA
  7. Only two Ankylosaurs are reported from the Hell Creek and Lance Formation the Nodosaurid Denversaurus schlessmani and Ankylosaurid Ankylosaurus magniventris. I've identified my material to reflect these dinosaurs and if additional ones are discovered will change my identification. Material from these dinosaurs are extremely difficult to find with Teeth and Scutes being the most common. Bones are extremely rare. My Tail Club - also have a container full of isolated pieces that go to the missing portion. A few representative scutes from my collection. Most come from one area and are most likely associated. Have +30 from this site. One of my dinner plate scutes I call this my Bactrian Camel double humped scute. Different locality with a bulbous base.
  8. Tail weaponry is nearly absent in living animals. Article and paper explores this subject Article https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/16/science/tails-weapons-dinosaurs.html?smid=tw-nytimesscience&smtyp=cur Paper http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/285/1871/20172299
  9. Zuul crurivastator David Evans of the ROM contributed in describing a new ankylosaur from northern Montana's Judith River Fornatikn. One of the most complete Ankylosaurs ever found ROM's release http://www.rom.on.ca/en/collections-research/research-community-projects/zuul http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/deadthings/2017/05/09/meet-zuul-crurivastator-i-aint-fraid-of-no-ankylosaur/#.WRJrc5BlDxA http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/05/demon-faced-dinosaur-named-after-ghostbusters-baddie
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