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Found 9 results

  1. Archaeopteryx gets company

    A non-archaeopterygid avialan theropod from the Late Jurassic of southern Germany Exciting news from Munich and the famous Solnhofen area Everybody is familiar with Archaeopteryx, but according to a new paper published by the University in Munich, it had a brother who lived at the same time in the same area: Alcmonavis poeschli The Late Jurassic ‘Solnhofen Limestones’ are famous for their exceptionally preserved fossils, including the urvogel Archaeopteryx, which has played a pivotal role in the discussion of bird origins. Here we describe a new, non-archaeopterygid avialan from the Lower Tithonian Mörnsheim Formation of the Solnhofen Archipelago, Alcmonavis poeschli gen. et sp. nov. Represented by a right wing, Alcmonavis shows several derived characters, including a pronounced attachment for the pectoralis muscle, a pronounced tuberculum bicipitale radii, and a robust second manual digit, indicating that it is a more derived avialan than Archaeopteryx. Several modifications, especially in muscle attachments of muscles that in modern birds are related to the downstroke of the wing, indicate an increased adaptation of the forelimb for active flapping flight in the early evolution of birds. This discovery indicates higher avialan diversity in the Late Jurassic than previously recognized. Scientific paper (in English, no paywall) CLICK News from the LMU University in Munich (in German) CLICK
  2. Archaeopteryx

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-45967655. There is no greater insult you can hurl at a museum than to suggest its prize fossil is a fake.
  3. Active flight in Archaeopteryx?

    New techniques of studying bone structure suggest a new take on Archaeopteryx's flight style. LINK
  4. Archaeopteryx Could Fly

    I assumed that it was already confirmed that Archaeopteryx could fly but apparently this debate is just now coming to a close. It took awhile. Article 1: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/archaeopteryx-flight-dinosaurs-birds-paleontology-science/ Article 2: https://gizmodo.com/new-evidence-suggests-archaeopteryx-could-fly-we-just-d-1823727562 The open access paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03296-8
  5. So apparently one of the rare Archaeopteryx fossils, the Haarlem specimen in Holland to be precise, turns out to be not an Archaeopteryx at all but a more primitive featured dinosaur closely related to the Chinese Anchiornis. This specimen from Bavaria, Germany was found (in 1855) well before Archaeopteryx was described and was originally misidentified as a Pterosaur. Only later was it identified as a feathered Archaeopteryx, which now it turns out might also not be completely accurate. With it now being described as an Anchiornithid, that makes it the only species of this group outside China. The Haarlem specimen has been named Ostromia crassipes. Open access paper https://bmcevolbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12862-017-1076-y A number of years ago I made a drawing of this specimen, I suppose I need to update it now My drawing, which also shows what remains are actually present on this specimen.
  6. Hi all ! A little more than a year ago, I had the opportunity to finally travel to Solnhofen (Germany). Thanks to my brother, who works in Germany, and gave me the opportunity to dedicate a small part of the Christmas holidays to enjoy the magnificent Upper Jurassic of Solnhofen. I have to admit, all types of the "konservat lagerstätte" have always made me fall in love. I am always fascinated with some exceptional preservation! For many years, I had been waiting for the opportunity to meet, FINALLY! to the Sciurumimus and Archaeopteryx Now, I can sleep much calmer, now that I have looked at them face-to-face! Apart from these two jewels, I was able to enjoy the magnificent collection that they possess in the Museum of Solnhofen. Which I recommend visiting ("Förderverein Bürgermeister Müller Museum Solnhofen") I remember that day, the German cold was tremendous! Still I tried to visit the outcrops, and below 20 cm of snow, I enjoyed opening some frozen lithographic limestones. Although without much success more than a mold of ammonites and half pneumonia! How cold it was! But it was a Great Trip !. Here I share it with you!
  7. To mark the occasion of this new sub forum for museums. I would like you show you some wonderful stuff in Teylers Museum in Haarlem, Netherlands. This is actually the oldest museum in the Netherlands and thus also has some really cool history attached to it and it's specimens. http://www.teylersmuseum.nl/en Besides fossils this museum also holds an art and science collection. The museum is just as beautiful as the specimens in it and a true time capsule. While it is quite a small museum, it's charm is worth the trip alone. Even the cabinets are pretty. It even has a few world firsts, such as Archaeopteryx and Mosasaurus. Now on to fossils! One of the most important specimens on display here is one of the Archaeopteryx specimens. This is actually the first Archaeopteryx as it was found before the feather and the London specimen were found. But for a long time it was labeled as a Pterodactylus. Only later was it found that it was in fact an Archaeopteryx. While very incomplete it is one of the larger animals of the genus (the third largest I think). the specimen consists of slab and counter slab. If you look close you can still see the vague impression of the flight feathers on the wings. It also very nicely shows the keratinous sheaths of the claws. Archaeopteryx lithographica Along with Archaeopteryx Teylers also has a very nice collection of the Jurassic of Solnhofen in Bavaria. They have a number of Rhamphorhynchus skeletons, lizards, fish, crustaceans and squids complete with tentacles and inksacs. Rhamphorhynchus Various fish Homocosaurus maximiliani Various critters
  8. http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27502354
  9. Photo Of An Archaeopteryx Fossil

    http://boingboing.net/2012/07/20/archaeopteryx-photo.html Really cool photo!! It also has an interesting story behind it too.
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