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Found 130 results

  1. FOSSIL or ARTIFACT?

    I found this in a fossil bed along with some clam fossils I was finding near Globe, Arizona. It was sitting in a depression on the ground near an exposed limestone fossil rift. The white band goes all the way around symmetrically and the rock type does not match anything in the area. is it a fossilized turtle shell, or nut maybe? or an indian artifact, or just an out of place rock?
  2. Vertebra identification request

    Found what may be a vertebra, sticking partially out of the ground on private property near Phoenix, Arizona in Maricopa County. The soil is hard-packed coarse sand/silt/gravel with areas of clay. A landscaper added a top dressing of decomposed granite and river rocks - a typical desert landscape design around here. The specimen likely was transported to the site in the river rock. Luck me! Other fossils found in the landscape material lead me to believe it came from a healthy and diverse marine environment with turtles, fish, shark, crocodilia, lizards, skate, snakes and mammals. The entire area was once an inland sea. The specimen is approximately 6.5 cm length x 5 cm width x 2 cm height. (Lateral measurement varies from 1.5 cm to 2.5 cm.) The vertebral body is 5 cm length x 4 cm height. Let me know what you think. The "tooth" on the distal side measures 2 cm.
  3. Arizona Pennsylvanian Coral

    The corals from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation in Arizona have not been officially described partly because many are silicified and have lost internal details. Any idea what these corals are with central columns that are vertically striated? Their average length is 2 to 3 cm. I think that they look like Lophophyllidium. Thanks, John
  4. EDIT: see complete post below Ynot's brief post. I found some amazing fossils last weekend north and east of Payson, Arizona in the Pennsylvanian aged Naco Formation. Clear skys and warm temperatures were tolerable because of the tree cover. The star of the show was a 40 cm slab with and upside down silicified Syringopora coral colony that showed the basal branches. Mother Nature started the etching process, I continued it with dilute pool acid. For scale, each coralite is about 2mm in diameter. The next star was a 23cm unidentified sponge.
  5. Any idea what these silicified possible crinoids are? Are they even crinoids? They are from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation from near Payson. The ones in the photos (both sides are shown) are from 0.8 to 1.5 cm wide. @crinus These two references might be of help. Anyone have access to the photos from these? Webster, G., & Olson, T. (1998). Nacocrinus elliotti, a New Pachylocrinid from the Naco Formation (Pennsylvanian, Desmoinesian) of Central Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 72(3), 510-512. Webster, Gary; Elliott, David. (2004). New information on crinoids (Echinodermata) from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation of central Arizona. The Mountain Geologist. 41. 77-86.
  6. Paleozoic Adventures in Arizona

    Here are photos of two trips taken to look for Paleozoic fossils in northern Gila County in northern Arizona. Daily thunderstorms and plentiful shade made the 90 deg. + temperatures bearable. I ran into TFF member ArizonaChris while in the area. In the Martin Formation I found interesting stromatoporoids, now determined to be sponges, that were important reef forming organisms during the Late Devonian. Pine needles for scale. Here are some silicified Martin Formation brachiopods. Nearby are many caves and sinks in the fossiliferous limestones of the Martin and Redwall Formations: up to 100 miles of passages according to a caver. The first one is full of junk metal including two cars. Any idea what the cars are? Here is Tin Can Sink. To be continued.
  7. Cool Fossil Prep Photo

    Here is a cool photo of a silicified Michelina coral that I was trying to extricate from Redwall Limestone with acid. It reminded me of my proposed TFF slogan/motto: "we place fossils on pedestals".
  8. Pennsylvanian Shark Tooth

    Anyone know what this Pennsylvanian (Desmoinian) shark tooth from Arizona is? The tooth is 40mm wide and 30mm from top of tooth to bottom of preserved root. The shape of the tooth suggests that it was a shell crusher. Thanks, John
  9. Mysteries of the Great Unconformity

    Mysteries of the Great Unconformity, a journey in deep geologic time by Michael Timmons, New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources. 'Earth Matters' https://geoinfo.nmt.edu/publications/periodicals/earthmatters/17/n1/em_v17_n1.pdf Joel, L. (2018), Erasing a billion years of geologic time across the globe, Eos, 99, https://doi.org/10.1029/2018EO092065. Published on 05 February 2018. https://eos.org/articles/erasing-a-billion-years-of-geologic-time-across-the-globe Yours, Paul H.
  10. Arizona Paleontology Literature by Taxonomy

    Here is Arizona Paleontology Literature by Taxonomy. Main page of Arizona Paleontology Guide link This is is a work in progress. I am working on formatting issues. Vertebrates general Single most complete list of references at end of publication. link
  11. Clam from Cretaceous Mural Limestone

    What is the cool clam from the Cretaceous Mural Limestone from southern Arizona? Trigonia? http://skywalker.cochise.edu/wellerr/fossil/pelecypod/bumpy2.htm See if anyone can confirm that it is one of these: Quadratotrigonia mearnsi? https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Trigoniid-bivalves-Mural-Formation-in-Sonora-and-Arizona-Figure-A-B-Buchotrigonia_fig4_249897573 Thanks, John ,
  12. Schnebly Hill Fm. plants

    What are the plants in the photos from the Pennsylvania/Permian boundry from the Schnebly Hill Formation near Payson, Arizona that I am linking to my Arizona Paleontology Guide? Photos are from geology teacher Stan Celestian and were not found by me. (I'm going to look at the location for plants). Thanks, John 1 Annularia? 2 Fern type? 3 Fern type?
  13. Arizona Paleontology Guide

    Arizona Paleontology Guide Paleontology Guides Master Index link My Favorite Paleontology Resources Guide link This is a guide to the most relevant literature, websites, photos and The Fossil Forum content relating to paleontology in Arizona. This main page is a continually updated and monitored index with links to subpages of paleontology resources. Click on links on this page to see content in the subpages. Click on link in the upper right of every subpage to go back to this main page, the index. This is a modest start for an important resource. I have more to add. Please contact me if you if you have any questions, suggestions or content that I should add. Feel free to send a link to this Guide to anyone that needs information about Arizona Paleontology. Thanks to Fruitbat, Joe, for his inspiration and many of the reference citations. Enjoy, John Arizona Paleontology Literature by Formation & Member etc. link Arizona Paleontology Literature by Geological Age link Arizona Paleontology Literature by Taxonomy link Arizona Paleontology Maps link Arizona Paleontology Photos link Arizona Paleontology Websites: General link Arizona Paleontology Websites: Museums, School Depts., Parks & Societies link
  14. Arizona Geological Maps

    Arizona geological maps organized by county and lithostratigraphic units. Back to main page Click on underlined links. Current and historical topo maps link State map link Counties Apache Cochise Coconino Gila Graham Greenlee Mohave Maricopa Navajo Pinal Pima Santa Cruz Yavapai Yuma (includes La Paz) Geological Units Martin Formation Windy Hill Fossils here.
  15. Arizona Paleontology Websites

    Paleontology websites for Arizona. Click on underlined links for content. Back to main page Museums Museum of Northern Arizona link Arizona Museum of Natural History link School departments Arizona State University link Search for paleontology in search box to find paleontology faculty. Northern Arizona University link University of Arizona link Parks Petrified Forest National Park link The best fossil forest park in the world. Kohl's Ranch Naco Paleo Site link Near Payson with lots of fossils. Societies Mineralogical Society of Arizona link Great society dedicated to geology, mineralogy and paleontology of Arizona. Lots of field trips including ones for fossils. Southwest Paleontological Society link Great publications, lectures and field trips to collect mostly vertebrate fossils including dinosaurs.
  16. Found in the Canelo Hills of Arizona. About 5" diameter, 1.5" thick. Very hard rock. The inner ring shows on the other side as well. Also has some very small and short grooves in rows on one edge. They look very unusual. Is it possibly a fossilized vertebra? What do you all think? It would only let me post one photo. I'll try to add more after posting.
  17. Arizona Fossil Photos

    Here are links to my favorite Arizona fossil photos. Back to main page Martin Formation Pseudoatrypa devonia Thamnopora Many in rock at Chasm Creek. Mural Limestone Clam Turitella Naco Formation Derbya crassa Common. Mucrospirifer Myalina nacoensis Chaunactis olsoni My best sponge. Fusilinid Hash Plate Kohl's Ranch Wilkingia terminale Redwall Formation Archimedes First ever reported from the Redwall. Schnebly Hill Formation Fern Naco? Equisetum Naco? Unknown sponge Silicified sponge from Fort Apache Member.
  18. Sponge

    Red chert radial sponge from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation found north of Payson, Arizona. NB. Pennsylvan is a subperiod, epoch is Late and age is Moscovian. (Desmoinian under old system.) Dilliard, Kelly & Rigby, J.K.. (2001). The new demosponges, Chaunactis olsoni and Haplistion nacoense, and associated sponges from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation, Central Arizona. Brigham Young University Geology Studies. 46. 1-11. geo_stud_vol_46_dilliard_rigby.pdf link
  19. Here is an annotated list of the best Arizona paleontology literature organized Back to main page by lithostratigraphic unit. Chinle Formation Geolex Publications. link Coconino Formation Geolex Publications. link Brand., L. R. (1979). Field and Laboratory Studies on the Coconino Sandstone (Permian) Fossil Vertebrate Footprints and Their Paleoecological Implications. Palaeogeog. Palaeoclimat. Palaeoecol., 28:25-38. link Controversial paper that tries to recreate trackways made in Coconino Sandstone. Concludes that they were most likely made underwater. Brand, L.R., and J. Kramer. (1996). Underprints of Vertebrate and Invertebrate Trackways in the Permian Coconino Sandstone in Arizona. Ichnos, 4:225-230. link Many prints in the Coconino may actually be underprints. Erickson, Bruce R. (2011). Lower Permian Tracks and Traces in the Science Museum of Minnesota, Ichnofossils III. Volume 5: Paleontology. 120 pp. link Great photos of only Coconino trace fossils. Fort Apache Member of Schnebly Hill Formation Geolex Publications. link Winters, S.S. (1963). Supai Formation (Permian) of Eastern Arizona. Geological Society of America Memoir, 89, 99 p. link Best paper for fossils. Additional species have been found by TFF members waiting to be properly documented. Behind a paywall. Frazier, R.H., (1961). The Fort Apache Limestone of east central Arizona: M.S. thesis, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, 58 p. link Gerard, Thomas A. (1964). Environmental Studies of the Fort Apache Member, Supai Formation, (Permian) East-Central Arizona. Phd Dissertation, University of Arizona. link Best stratigraphy. Arizona Chris' TFF posts: link link link link link link link link link link link link Kaibab Formation Geolex Publications. link Chronic, Halka. (1952). Molluscan fauna from the Permian Kaibab Formation, Walnut Canyon, Arizona. Geological Society of America Bulletin 63. link Very good resource for mollusks. Hodnett, J. P. M., Elliott, D. K., Olson, T. J., & Wittke, J. H. (2012). Ctenacanthiform sharks from the Permian Kaibab Formation, northern Arizona. Historical Biology, 24(4), 381-395. Good paper on Permian sharks. link Hunt, A.P., et al. (2005). Permian Vertebrates of Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 29. link Vertebrates are not common in the Arizona Permian. Naco Formation Geolex Publications. info ASU West. Fossils of the Naco Formation. link Photos of fossils from the now gone original Kohl's Ranch site. Lundin, Robert F. and Colin Sumrall. (1999). Ostrocodes From The Naco Formation (Upper Carboniferous) At The Kohl Ranch Locality, Central Arizona. Journal of Paleontology. 73. 454-460. link Microfossils from classic now gone site. Reid, A.M. (1968). Biostratigraphy of the Naco Formation (Pennsylvanian) of South-Central Arizona. Ph.D. Dissertation - The University of Arizona. (340 pages) link Micropaleontology only. Reid, A.M. (1966). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Naco Formation in the Southern Dripping Springs Mountains, Near Winkelman, Gila County, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Arizona. link One of best papers on Naco fossils. Lists many species and has so so photos. Pictorial Guide to Upper Pennsylvanian Fossils By Ben Neuman, in conjunction with the Dallas Paleontological Society link Great photos of fossils, some found in the Naco. Arizona Chris' TFF posts link Martin Formation Geolex Publications. link Beus, S. (1978). Late Devonian (Frasnian) Invertebrate Fossils from the Jerome Member of the Martin Formation, Verde Valley, Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 52(1), 40-54. link Great resource with photos. Hussakof, L. (1942). Fishes from the Devonian of Arizona. American Museum Novitates, Number 1186. link Mentions Mt. Eldon Fauna near Flagstaff. Huddle, J.W. and E. Dobrovolny (1952). Devonian and Mississippian Rocks of Central Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 233-D. link Great stratigraphy paper. Helps to identify several fossil bearing formations in northern Arizona. Mentions several fossil bearing areas. Stumm, Erwin C., (1948). Upper Devonian Compound Tetracoral from the Martin Limestone. Journal of Paleontology, Vol. 22:1, pp. 40-47. link Meader, N.M. (1977). Paleoecology and Paleoenvironments of the Upper Devonian Martin Formation in the Roosevelt Dam-Globe Area, Gila County, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Arizona. link Mentions many fossils and severals sites where they are found. Views of the Mahantango link link link link link link link link Blog by TFF member with photos about collecting near Payson. Several articles. Escabrosa Formation Geolex Publications. link Redwall Formation Geolex Publication link Brezinski, David. (2017). Trilobites from the Redwall Limestone (Mississippian) of Arizona. Annals of Carnegie Museum. 84. 165-171. link Best paper for Redwall trilobites. Carter, John L., David K. Brezinski, Albert D. Kollar and J. Thomas Dutro Jr. (2014). Brachiopoda Taxonomy and Biostratigraphy of the Redwall Limestone (Lower Mississippian) of Arizona. Annals of Carnegie Museum 82(3):257-290. link The best article for Redwall brachiopods. Easton, W. H. and Gutschick, R. C. (1953). Corals from the Redwall Limestone (Mississippian) of Arizona. Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences: Vol. 52: Iss. 1. link Quality paper for descriptions, pictures and localities of corals. Huddle, J.W. and E. Dobrovolny. (1952). Devonian and Mississippian Rocks of Central Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 233-D. link Great stratigraphy paper. Helps to identify several fossil bearing formations in northern Arizona. Mentions several fossil bearing areas. McKee, Edwin D., Raymond C. Gutschick and Betty Skipp. (1969). History of the Redwall Limestone of Northern Arizona. Volume 114 of Memoir (Geological Society of America) link Best all around paper for the paleontology of the Redwall. Behind paywall. Bowsher, A. (1954). The Stratigraphic Significance of a Crinoid from the Redwall Limestone of Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 28(1), 113-116. link Sando, William J. (1963). New Species of Colonial Rugose Corals from the Mississippian of Northern Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, v. 37, no. 5, p.1074-1079, plates. 145, 146, 1 fig. link Sando, William J. (1964). Stratigraphic importance of corals in the Redwall Limestone, Northern Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 501-C, p. C39-C42, 3 figs. link Spencer, J.E., Richard, S.M., Ferguson, C.A., and Gilbert, W.G. (1999). Preliminary Bedrock Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the Windy Hill 7.5' Quadrangle, Gila County, Arizona. Arizona Geological Survey Open File Report, OFR-99-12, 1 map sheet, map scale 1:24,000. link Redwall is fossiliferous in the area. Schnebly Hill Formation Geolex Publication. link McGoon, Jr., D O. (1962). Occurrences of Paleozoic Carbonaceous Deposits in the Mogollon Rim Region. in Guidebook of the Mogollon Rim Region, East-Central Arizona, 1962: New Mexico Geological Society Thirteenth Field Conference, p. 90-91. link Pennsylvanian/Permian plant fossils. J. E. Canright and E. B. Blazey. (1974). A Lower Permian flora from Promontory Butte, central Arizona. In S.R. Ash(ed.), Guidebook to Devonian, Permian and Triassic Plant Localities, East-central Arizona. Paleobotanical Section, Botanical Society of America, 25th Annual AIBS Meeting 57-62 [H. Sims/S. Ostrowski] Blazey, E.B., (1974), Fossil flora of the Mogollon Rim, central Arizona: Palaeontographica, v. B146, p. 1-20.
  20. Hi. I believe this is from Arizona. But not sure of the origin and type of wood. Any ideas would surely help. I have many pounds if this. Please help
  21. Arizona Paleontology Papers

    Here is an annotated list of the best Arizona paleontology literature. Back to main page Precambrian Cambrian ISCS Field Conference (2011). Cambrian Stratigraphy and Paleontology of Northern Arizona and Southern Nevada. The 16th Field Conference of the Cambrian Stage Subdivision Working Group, International Subcommission on Cambrian Stratigraphy, Hollingsworth, J.S., F.A. Sundberg and J.R. Foster (eds.), Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin 67. Devonian Huddle, J.W. and E. Dobrovolny (1952). Devonian and Mississippian Rocks of Central Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 233-D. link Great stratigraphy paper. Helps to identify several fossil bearing formations in northern Arizona. Mentions several fossil bearing areas. Hussakof, L. (1942). Fishes from the Devonian of Arizona. American Museum Novitates, Number 1186. link Mentions Mt. Eldon Fauna near Flaggstaff. Meader, N.M. (1977). Paleoecology and Paleoenvironments of the Upper Devonian Martin Formation in the Roosevelt Dam-Globe Area, Gila County, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Arizona. link Mentions many fossils and severals sites where they are found. Carboniferous Dilliard, Kelly & Rigby, J.K.. (2001). The new demosponges, Chaunactis olsoni and Haplistion nacoense, and associated sponges from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation, Central Arizona. Brigham Young University Geology Studies. 46. 1-11. link Huddle, J.W. and E. Dobrovolny (1952). Devonian and Mississippian Rocks of Central Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 233-D. link Good overview of Devonian and Mississippian rocks. Easton, W. H. and Gutschick, R. C. (1953) Corals from the Redwall Limestone (Mississippian) of Arizona. Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences: Vol. 52: Iss. 1. link Quality paper for descriptions, pictures and localities of corals. Lundin, Robert F. and Colin Sumrall. (1999). Ostrocodes From The Naco Formation (Upper Carboniferous) At The Kohl Ranch Locality, Central Arizona. Journal of Paleontology. 73. 454-460. link Microfossils from classic now gone site. Irmis, R.B. and D.K. Elliott (2006). Taphonomy of a Middle Pennsylvanian Marine Vertebrate Assemblage and an Actualistic Model for Marine Abrasion of Teeth. Palaios, Vol.21. link Reid, A.M. (1968). Biostratigraphy of the Naco Formation (Pennsylvanian) of South-Central Arizona. Ph.D. Dissertation - The University of Arizona. (340 pages) link Micropaleontology only. Reid, A.M. (1966). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Naco Formation in the Southern Dripping Springs Mountains, Near Winkelman, Gila County, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Arizona. link One of best papers on Naco fossils. Lists many species and has so so photos. Permian Chronic, Halka. (1952). Molluscan fauna from the Permian Kaibab Formation, Walnut Canyon, Arizona. Geological Society of America Bulletin 63. link Very good resource for molluscs. Hunt, A.P., et al. (2005). Permian Vertebrates of Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona. Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 29. link Vertebrates are not common in the Arizona Permian. Wilt, Jan Carol, (1969) Petrology and stratigraphy of the Colina limestone (Permian) in Cochise County, Arizona U of A MS thesis link Triassic Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas (2003). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Lower Chinle Group (Adamanian: Latest Carnian) in the Vicinity of St. Johns, Arizona. In: New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 54th Field Conference, Geology of the Zuni Plateau. link Heckert, A.B., S.G. Lucas and A.P. Hunt (2005). Triassic Vertebrate Fossils in Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona (Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas, eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 29. link Kirby, R.E. (1989). Late Triassic Vertebrate Localities of the Owl Rock Member (Chinle Formation) in the Ward Terrace Area of Northern Arizona. In: Lucas, S.G., and Hunt, A.P., eds., Dawn of the age of dinosaurs in the American southwest New Mexico Museum of Natural History Martz, J.W. and W.G. Parker (2010). Revised Lithostratigraphy of the Sonsela Member (Chinle Formation, Upper Triassic) in the Southern Part of Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona. PLoS ONE, 5(2). link Parker, W.G. (2005). Faunal Review of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology of Arizona. McCord, R.D. (ed.), Mesa Southwest Bulletin, Number 11. link Spielmann, J.A., S.G. Lucas and A.B. Heckert (2007). Tetrapod Fauna of the Upper Triassic (Revueltian) Owl Rock Formation, Chinle Group, Arizona. In: The Global Triassic. Lucas, S.G. and J.A. Spielmann (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 41. link Jurassic Irmis, R.B. (2005). A Review of the Vertebrate Fauna of the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology of Arizona. McCord, R.D. (ed.), Mesa Southwest Museum Bulletin Number 11. link Cretaceous Hattori, K.E. (2017). Architecture of a mid-Cretaceous patch reef: High resolution mapping provides new insight into facies geometries and ecological relationships at Paul Spur, Bisbee, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Texas at Austin. link I would love to find some of the rudistid reefs. Hayes, P.T. (1970). Cretaceous Paleogeography of Southeastern Arizona and Adjacent Areas. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 658-B. link Arizona cannot compare to the fossil abundance of Texas. Lucas, S.G. and A.B. Heckert (2005). Distribution, Age and Correlation of Cretaceous Fossil Vertebrates from Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona. (Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas, eds.) New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin Number 29. link Miocene Morgan, G.S. and R.S. White (2005). Miocene and Pliocene Vertebrates from Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona. (Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas, eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin Number 29. link Pliocene Czaplewski, N.J. (2011). An owl-pellet accumulation of small Pliocene vertebrates from the Verde Formation, Arizona, USA. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.14, Number 3. link Without owls we would not know much about the small vertebrate of the Verde Formation. Morgan, G.S. and R.S. White (2005). Miocene and Pliocene Vertebrates from Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona. (Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas, eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin Number 29. link White, R.S. and G.S. Morgan (2005). Arizona Blancan Vertebrate Faunas in Regional Perspective. In: Vertebrate Paleontology of Arizona. (McCord, R.D., ed.), Mesa Southwest Museum Bulletin Number 11. link Arizona has a rich Blancan flora. General Gidley, J.W. (1925). Fossil Proboscidea and Edentata of the San Pedro Valley, Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 140-B. link Gidley, J.W. (1922). Preliminary Report on Fossil Vertebrates of the San Pedro Valley, Arizona, With Descriptions of New Species of Rodentia and Lagomorpha. U.S. Geological Society - Shorter Contributions to General Geology. link Lindsay, E.H. (1984). Windows to the Past: Fossils of the San Pedro Valley. Fieldnotes from the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology, Vol.14, Number 4. link Thrasher, L.C. Fossils of the San Simon Valley, Graham County, Arizona. U.S. Bureau of Land Management. link Twenter, F.R. New Fossil Localities in the Verde Formation, Verde Valley, Arizona. New Mexico Geological Society, Thirteenth Field Conference. link Wilt, J. and D. Schumacher (1993). Fossils of the Paleozoic Formations of Southeastern Arizona. link
  22. Best Arizona Paleontology Websites General

    Here is an annotated list of my favorite Arizona paleontology websites. Back to main page Arizona Fossil Adventures by TFF member Chris Schur. link My favorite site with lots of photos of fossils and their localities. Fruitbat's Pdf Library of Arizona paleontology literature. link Comprehensive list with links to literature available without paying or sign ups. Great resource; thanks Joe. T-Rat by Ron Ratkevich. link Great site for Arizona paleontology and archeology information. Lots of general directions to collecting sites. Southern Arizona Fossils by Walt. link Lots of photos and a few videos of mostly in situ southern Arizona fossils. Photos of Fossils by Cochise College geology instructor, Roger Weller. link Great photos of fossils, many from Arizona. Arizona Fossils and Paleontology WebRing by Jack D. Mount. link There are lots of indexes of Arizona paleontology articles from several publications. A gem. Arizona State Geological Map link The Fossil Forum Arizona Fossil Sites subsection. link
  23. unidentified fossil help

    Hello, I am glad I found this forum; recently I purchased several acres in northern arizona and I found a few rocks/fossils on my land that I was hoping someone could help me identify. Any idea or suggestion is appreciated. Thank you 1st fossil/rock of 3
  24. Redwall Mississippian Fossil

    I found this long exterior mold fossil in Mississippian Redwall Formation chert from Gila County, Arizona. I think that it might be the central support for an Archimedes sp. bryozoan. Two sources say that they have not been reported from the Redwall Formation even though they are reported from other Mississippian formations in Arizona. What do members think the fossil might be? @Arizona Chris
  25. Crinonid Stem, Arizona 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid Stem Piece - Arizona Naco Formation, Arizona Pennsylvanian age (Desmoinesian to Virgilian,310 to 304 Million Years Ago) Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
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