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Found 204 results

  1. Kaibab Sponges & Other Fossils

    I took my first long trip (more than 15 minutes) to search for Permian fossils in the Kaibab Limestone of central Arizona near Pine. I have previously only collected silicified fossils that had been transported south of the Mogollon Rim by streams. The Kaibab is known for two silicified fossils that are great index fossils for the Leonardian (Kungarian) Age across western US: Peniculauris bassi, a brachiopod and Actinocoelia maeadrina, a sponge. At first I was disappointed because I have heard that you could collect hundreds of each type in a short period of time. However I found a couple of sponges with the best 3 D texture that I have seen on the internet. They each are each about 13 cm in length. I will take quality over quantity any day. The Peniculauris bassi brachiopod is about 5 cm wide. I also found some very detailed echinoid spines (3.5 cm field of view). I will have to go back to the top of the Rim to collect more types of fossils. I only have a few hundred square miles of Kaibab to search, exclude that near the Grand Canyon. Good reference on Actinicoelia maeadrina: Griffin LR (1966) Actinocoelia maeandrina Finks, from the Kaibab Limestone of northern Arizona. Brigham Young Univ Geol Stud 13: 105–108 http://geology.byu.edu/home/sites/default/files/actinocoelia-maeandrina-finks-from-the-kaibab-limestone-of-northern-arizona-leland-r.-
  2. bone fragment? Flagstaff, Arizona

    I found this and initially thought it was uniquely shaped petrified wood. We have found a lot of petrified wood in the same spot. However, all of the wood that I have found has some evidence of tree rings in the cross section. This does not. The "bottom" or blunt end, looks more like worn bone to my untrained eye. I know that identifying what kind of bone will be impossible, but I am just looking for confirmation that it is indeed bone, and not petrified wood, or just a strange mineral structure in rock. It was found near the Little Colorado River, near Gray Mountain, Arizona, which is about 45 mins north of Flagstaff, AZ. It was found on the surface. We have found what we believe are coprolites with very well preserved seeds in the same exact spot. Thank you for any help!
  3. Help ID radial pattern

    Hello, I found this rock this morning behind my house and I'm drawing a blank as to what it could be. There are lots of brachiopods, bivalves and gastropods in this particular area but nothing that matches this. It kinda looks like an end view of a coral but I only find those about a mile away and not preserved like this. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks for looking. Northern Arizona, Mississippian, Redwall Limestone, Mooney Member.
  4. Help me with Pine AZ Fossil ID???

    This is a piece about 2 inches wide. It is Carboniferous limestone in Northern AZ, but I do not recognize the branched, leafy fossil. Any help?
  5. The below classic monograph on the fossil plants of the Hermit Shale, Permian, Arizona is now available online as a downloadable PDF file. Flora of the Hermit shale, Grand Canyon, Arizona by David White Series: Carnegie Institution of Washington publication no. 405 https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/166069#/summary https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/subject/Grand Canyon#/titles Yours, Paul H.
  6. Pine AZ Fossil ID???

    My first attempt here. I'm having a great time exploring the Mogollon Rim area near our home here in Arizona. The Kohl's Ranch area near Payson is famous for its Carboniferous brachiopods, but I have a piece that has obvious bryozoans. But in this photo there are two pieces that are "fern" shape. The longer of the two is about 1/2 inch long. They have me stumpred.
  7. Unknown Fossil

    Hi, I’ve recently come back from a trip near Benson, Arizona on public land, and found this rock with a fossil. I myself am not a fossil expert or collector, but I’m curious as to what I’ve picked up, thank you. The dimensions are about 1.905 cm x 5.08cm
  8. Possible Coprolite or just mud cracks?

    Picked this up in Arizona, and I unfortunately do not remember exactly where. I initially thought it might be a coprolite, but looking at it now it looks like it may be just a lump of preserved mud cracks. Any ideas on what this might be, or what would cause a rock like this to form? The rock is about 4.5x3x2 cm and shows the cracks on all sides.
  9. cricetid and arvicolid rodents of the California Wash local fauna,Late Blancan of the San Pedro valley,Arizona Cristiana Mezzabotta 2015_Mezzabotta_224.pdf Palaeovertebrata,Montpellier/v.26,1-4,1997
  10. Arizona Miocene lake bed fossils

    I found these in Miocene lake bed limestone in central Arizona. Palm, reeds and stromatolites have been found in same layer nearby. I see no radial laminations that may indicate that these are algal growths. What are these round cap like structures? @paleoflor All the ones that I have found are round and 3 to 4 cm across. They are all shaped like spheres with the bottom 55 to 60% “missing”. The first three photos are from the top, side and bottom views. The fourth photo is of one still in the rock. The slight gap around the sphere appears to be an empty mold of the mystery object. The last photo is my drawing of what most of the fossils look like. I have an idea of what they might be. Let’s get some other opinions before I give you mine. 1 top view 2 semi side view 3 bottom view 4 in situ 5 idealized diagram
  11. Trace fossils? Coral? Anemone? Worms?!?

    Hey there! This is my first post on The Fossil Forum. I don't have a lot of knowledge about fossils, but I sure do know how to find them. Hopefully these aren't too obvious and boring, but I'm incredibly curious anyway. I found these near Sheep Bridge north of Phoenix, Arizona. Here the Verde river has cut through deep layers of ancient lava, sandstone, mudstone, etc. I was exploring for crystals up on a steep hill along the river's canyon walls when I came across a whole lot of these things. They are very fragile and I didn't want to break apart some of the 2-3 foot wide boulders of them so as to preserve them for others to find. Anyway, my understanding is that this area was once a sea floor, so I'm assuming they are some type of coral, anemone or something similar. The fossils are composed mostly of the same sediment which encases them, so I suppose they must be trace fossils, but please correct me if I am wrong. Other not-so-filled-in ones even had crystals and other minerals lining the cavity. As well, I looked at a geological map of Arizona and the area I was exploring is composed of the following... Late to Middle Miocene Basaltic Rocks (8-16 Ma): Mostly dark, mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Pliocene to Middle Miocene Deposits (2-16 Ma): Moderately to strongly consolidated conglomerate and sandstone deposited in basins during and after late Tertiary faulting. Includes lesser amounts of mudstone, siltstone, limestone, and gypsum. There are a couple photos of some ball shaped objects which were very easy to knock apart from the surrounding stone. I have no idea what those could be. The rest of the photos are of the coral looking objects. Some of them, if still intact, were nearly 24 inches long, but I left those behind and only took smaller samples. Please note how the "head" of the corals appears to flare out and is larger than the rest of the stem. Finally, some of them appear to have a little node sticking out of the "head," but I suspect that may be due to weathering as these are very fragile fossils. Thank you all so much for your interest and help and I look forward to learning more!
  12. Worm Creature from Arizona Desert

    Hello, I have been finding all sorts of neat rocks and marine fossils in the desert outside of Yuma, Arizona where the Colorado river had once flowed into a large ocean. There seems to be some sort of worm creature fossilized in this stone? I would appreciate an ID on the specimen, or speculation as to what it is? Thank you.
  13. Hello, I have been finding all sorts of neat rocks and marine fossils in the desert outside of Yuma, Arizona where the Colorado river had once flowed into a large ocean. Are these fossilized coral or sponges? I would appreciate an ID on the specimens, or speculations as to what they are? Thank you.
  14. Hello, I was trying to find the identity of some marine fossils I found, and found this great forum! I am from Montana, but have been wintering in Yuma, Arizona. I have been finding all sorts of neat rocks and marine fossils in the desert outside of Yuma where the Colorado river had once flowed into a large ocean. I have found several roundish rocks that seem to have fossilized marine life in them? I was told by a Coprolite collector that is a characteristic of Coprolite found in this area? I would appreciate an ID on the specimens, or speculations as to what they are? Below is one specimen, different angles, notice the square holes!? Thanks!
  15. Footprint maybe?

    Found this not far from the other footprints. This is sandstone. I can’t really tell for sure.
  16. Miocene Fossil Microbe ? Mats

    I found the silicified and brecciated laminar structures in Miocene lake deposits north of Phoenix, Arizona. Could they be disturbed algal mats? I envision a drying algal mat in a lake that is disturbed by an event such as a flood, windstorm, landslide or earthquake. Compare to Kinneyia trace fossil: https://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/2015/10/23/woosters-fossil-maybe-of-the-week-kinneyia-ripples/ Confirmed stromatolites occur nearby in the lake sediments. Photo 1: typical wrinkled/ cracked marks in surface of laminar structures. Photo 2: typical piece of folded and brecciated laminar structures. Photo 3: detail of photo 2. Photo 4: edge of rock in photo 2. 4.5 cm field of view. Photo 5: Another piece. Photo 6: detail of photo 5. Photo 7: edge of photo 5. 3 cm field of view.
  17. Arizona Miocene Meanders

    Miocene lakebed deposits north of Phoenix have revealed more than palm and unknown reed like plants. I found stromatolites preserved in black, gray and white chalcedony. Although not as common as in the Precambrian, stromatolites still occur in oceans and in lakes. See article about the ones in Utah’s Great Salt Lake: https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/glad-you-asked/is-there-coral-in-the-great-salt-lake/ My favorite one is this 10 cm high detail of a much larger stromatolite. #1 This 38 cm one came home with me. #2 Here is a detail of #2. 9 x 13 cm. #3 Here is a 6 cm high relatively flat stromatolite. #4 Detail of side of #4. Scattered pieces of palm occur. 9.5 cm high. #6 This silicified palm has calcite crystals growing in it. 13.5 cm long. #7 Detail of #7. It looks like an art piece.
  18. Footprints and tail drag

    Turned this approx 4 sq. ft. rock over today. Lots of footprints and a nice tail drag.
  19. Another rock of chirotherium

    A nice set of chirotherium.
  20. Rock full of tiny prints

    Turned over this large rock this morning. Covered in small (1-2”) three toed footprints.
  21. Unknown footprints

    Don’t know what this print is. Doesn’t look like the chirotherium. Found it today.
  22. New chirotherium

    Finally some nice weather to do some digging. Couple more single prints. Got a crane to start moving the big slabs with multiple prints!
  23. I found this strange Composita subtilita at the Paleo Site bear Kohls Ranch, Arizona. It is from the Middle Pennsylvanian Naco Formation. Does anyone know what’s going on with the strange pattern? Flip side I also should be able to provide slightly higher quality photos if needed, I just reduced the quality to be able to post several PS-I wasn’t sure if I should post this here since I have an ID, so please move it if it shouldn’t be
  24. Amazing Arizona Adventure II

    I went back to my very productive Devonian Martin Formation and Mississippian Escabrosa Formation near Superior, Arizona to retrieve my large single crinoid head fossil. Amazing Arizona Adventure original post link After some acid prep four crinoids and one blastoid were clustered together. Currents probably sorted them by size and shape. Several more hours of acid prep made the remaining four best ones stand out. I had to carefully break away pieces of shell that adhered and covered the crinoids and blastoid. Careful monitoring of their progress prevented any of them falling off the matrix. The resulting piece is probably the finest crinoid and blastoid assemblage ever found in Arizona. Finding one crinoid or blastoid cast in Arizona is very hard let alone four or five together. The two largest crinoids in the center and left are likely Physetocrinus lobatus. The upper right is an Orophocrinus saltensis blastoid. The lower right is an unknown crinoid. (Any idea what it is?) The field of view is about 7.5 cm wide. Keep looking for updates as I prep and post more fossils. I found several loose crinoid heads.
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