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Found 31 results

  1. Cambrian arthropod?

    Need help to identify this, it could be rare, but not sure. If not a naroiid, or soft bodied trilobite, than what could this be? Found at Little Hollow Formation...Cambrian, Nova Scotia. It is extremely small, barely visible to the naked eye. Tip of ball point pen for scale. I have magnified it with a digital microscope, 250x magnification. Has anyone ever seen this in their research or studies of fossils?
  2. Looks like a giant isopod?

    Hi all, Was recently on a short break to Rottnest Island in Western Australia and found a bunch of these in the rocks near the beach on the east coast of the island. I thought they looked like giant isopods but have no idea when they are from or if I am remotely close? Any suggestions? Ta Dan
  3. Body segment?

    Found at Hungry Hollow in Devonian-era clay. Seems iron-rich, so it is possibly man-made. Is it a segmented body part? Both sides depicted, with end views
  4. shrimp

    From the album Mazon creek assortment

  5. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you . Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since October 13, 2017. Phylum Arthopoda Class Marrellomorpha Haug, J.T., et al. (2013). A Marrella-like arthropod from the Cambrian of Australia: A new link between "Orsten"-type and Burgess Shale assemblages. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(3). Order Acercostraca Legg, D.A. (2015). The morphology and affinities of Skania fragilis (Arthropoda) from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale. Bulletin of Geosciences, 90(3). Lin, J.-P. (2003). Systematics and Taphonomy of Naraoia and Skania (Arthropoda) from Guizhou, China, and Western North America. Masters Thesis - The Ohio State University. Lin, J.-P., et al. (2006). A Parvancorina-like arthropod from the Cambrian of South China. Historical Biology, 18(1). Siveter, D.J., et al. (2007). A Silurian 'marrellomorph' arthropod. Proc.R.Soc. B, 274. Order Marrellida Aris, M.J., et al. (2017). A new marrellomorph euarthropod from the Early Ordovician of Argentina. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 62(1). Garcia-Bellido, D.C. and D.H. Collins (2004). Moulting arthropod caught in the act. Nature (Brief Communications), Vol.429. Liu, Q. (2013). The First Discovery of Marrella (Arthropoda, Marrellomorpha) from the Balang Formation (Cambrian Series 2) in Hunan, China. Journal of Paleontology, 87(3). Rak, S., J. Ortega-Hernandez and D.A.Legg (2013). A revision of the Late Ordovician marellomorph arthropod Furca bohemica from Czech Republic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(3). (Thanks to piranha for finding this one!) Zhou, Y., et al. (2003). The occurrence of the genus Marrella (Trilobitoidea) in Asia. Progress in Natural Science, Vol.13, Number 9. General Marrellomorpha Jones, W.T., et al. The First Post-Cambrian Marrellomorph Arthropod from North America. (Poster) Legg, D. (2016). Fossil Focus: Marrellomorph arthropods. Palaeontology Online, Vol.6, Article 5.
  6. Well it's been a while since I've last been on (over two months), and I know how much you all have been missing me , so I decided to finally get around to photographing some of the finds I've made over the summer. I've talked a bit earlier this year about collecting in the Frederick Limestone and other upper Cambrian-lower Ordovician units, but these finds are from rocks far, far older than those, nearly 100 million years older! These fossils are among some of the oldest in Maryland, and in the Mid-Atlantic region, which was part of the reason I collected them in the first place (because, let's be honest, most aren't that appealing). If you find these things interesting, the Araby was originally mapped as the Antietam Sandstone until about 1940ish when it became a separate geologic formation due to the strong difference in rock-type most common in either (the Antietam is mostly a quartz-sandstone, the Araby mostly a sandy and muddy shale and siltstone). When the time for the split came, the new name Araby was given to the formation that occupied a band roughly stretching from the Potomac River to the south north in a rough question mark shape to Pennsylvania as the type locality was situated near Araby Church (an interesting bit. A geologic formation from the Cambrian explosion named after a church!). Nowadays the church is gone as far as I know, but the area still bears the name with the apply named Araby Church Road. Going back further, in July of 1864, the Araby Formation would play a major role in the Battle of Monocacy. As Confederate forces under Jubal Early's command were marching east along the B&O RR, they were stopped in the vicinity of Frederick by scattered forces under the command of Union General Lew Wallace. During the day long battle (fought July 9), Wallace's outnumbered force of 5,000 men used the hills and small ridges to their east as a last line to stem the Confederate tide, strength roughly 15,000. This ridge, of course, was made up of the resistant Araby Formation, whose clastics didn't erode through time as quickly as the carbonates of the Frederick Limestone. Unfortunately for Wallace and the Union, the Confederates were able to outflank their positions, and forced them to retreat east past Urbana. Although it was a Confederate victory (the northernmost of the war), the battle delayed Early's advance for a crucial 24 hours, allowing reinforcements from the Union 6th Corps near Petersburg to arrive in Washington DC in time to stop the Confederate attacks on July 11-12 at Fort Stevens. Interesting to see how geology plays a role in how battles (and history!) are fought. I collected twice this summer, once in the early part and another time in September, from a roadcut near Frederick. This cut exposes the early Cambrian Araby Formation, which is nearly 550-530 million years old. The Araby is a nearshore clastic unit, likely deposited in a surf/beach zone on the elevated Piedmont block (a fancy term for a higher lying seabed). As such, it roughly correlates to the Antietam Sandstone further west, as well as, more roughly, the Kinzers Formation in Pennsylvania in the upper sections. Geologically speaking, the Araby is divided into coarser, almost buff siltstone and sandstone units and black, slaty-shale and siltstone (this includes the former Cash Smith Shale, which was found out to be in the middle of the Araby upon later work) ones. The darker, shale layers likely were deposited during times of deeper water, as there exists a degree of faunal differences between the two to suggest such (Olenellus thompsoni has been recorded from the black layers, but I never found any). Later, during the Taconic and Acadian Orogenies, the Araby Formation was slightly metamorphosed as were most other Piedmont and Blue Ridge units, though some parts escaped mostly untouched. These, of course, have the best fossils. Boring rock stuff out of the way, the Araby and the Antietam were formed at a special time in Earth's history called the Cambrian Explosion, which was a period when life underwent a rapid series of diversifications. Luckily we didn't miss out much here! Many beds of the Araby are filled with burrows and other traces of ancient wormlike creatures, as well as rarer edioasteroids, trilobites, and other creatures. Unfortunately little work has been done on the Cambrian units of Maryland, and less still on the Araby, so I haven't found any list of actual names for any species. As such, I'll use names from the Antietam Sandstone, as the two are time, stratigraphically, and lithologically equivalent. By far the most common fossils were the worm burrows, Skolithos linearis. These are rounded, somewhat tube shaped objects in their usual form, though they can sometimes occur as cross sections as you'll soon see. On top of this, they're also sometimes preserved in iron minerals, as is common with many other fossils. From what I've gathered, these "tubes" are interpreted to be the resting places of worms, likely annelids. Now, I'm not claiming to know 100% what some of these are so if any of you may have a better ID please let me know. First up are the Skolithos linearis. The first image is of a fairly typical "tube" shaped structure. The second image shows a cross section cut-away of a "tube", partially mineralized in what is likely iron (iii) oxide. The third image is of a large, albeit poorly preserved, complex of "tubes". The general way to tell where they are is by looking for the dark contours of them, and tracing them that way.
  7. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since October 12, 2017. Phylum Arthropoda Ordovician Trilobites Africa/Middle East Corbacho, J. and F.J. Lopez-Soriano (2013). Chattiaspis? budili : a new Dalmanitidae species from Morocco; Upper Ordovician (Lower Katian). Batalleria, 19. Corbacho, J. and J.A. Vela (2013). Parvilichas marochii : New genus and species of Lichidae from the Zagora region (Morocco); Early Ordovician (Floian). Scripta Musei Geologici Seminarii Barcinonensis - Series palaentologica, Number XIV. Corbacho, J. and F.J. Lopez-Soriano (2012). A new asaphid trilobite from the Lower Ordovician (Arenig) of Morocco. Batalleria, 17. Corbacho, J. and C. Kier (2011). Trilobites of a new outcrop of Upper Ordovician in Jebel Tijarfaiouine, El Kaid Errami (Morocco), with first mention of the genus Corrugatagnostus. Scripta Musei Geologici Seminarii Barcinonensis - Series palaentologica, Number X. Corbacho, J. and J.A. Vela (2010). Giant Trilobites from Lower Ordovician of Morocco. Batalleria, 15. Dean, W.T. and Z. Zhiyi (1988). Upper Ordovician Trilobites from the Zap Valley, South-East Turkey. Palaeontology, Vol.31, Part 3. El-Khayal, A.A., and M. Romano (1985). Lower Ordovician Trilobites from the Hanadir Shale of Saudi Arabia. Palaeontology, Vol.28, Part 2. Feist, R., M. Yazdi and T. Becker (2003). Famennian Trilobites from the Shotori Range, E-Iran. Ann.Soc.Geol. du Nord, 10. Lopez-Soriano, F.J. and J. Corbacho (2012). A new species of Symphysops from the Upper Ordovician of Morocco. Batalleria, 17. Martin, E.L.O., et al. (2016). Biostratigraphic and palaeoenvironmental controls on the trilobite associations from the Lower Ordovician Fezouata Shale of the central Anti-Atlas, Morocco. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 460. Pour, M.G. (2006). Early Ordovician (Tremadocian) trilobites from Simeh-Kuh, Eastern Alborz, Iran. In: Studies in Palaeozoic palaeontology. Bassett, M.G. and V.K. Deisler (eds.), National Museum of Wales Geological Series, Number 25. Pour, M.G. and L.E. Popov (2009). First report on the occurrence of Neseuretinus and Ovalocephalus trilobites in the Middle Ordovician of Iran. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 54(1). Pour, M.G. and S.T. Turvey (2009). Revision of some Lower to Middle Ordovician leiostegiid and associated trilobites from Iran and China. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 37. Pour, M.G., M. Vidal and M. Hosseini-Nezhad (2007). An Early Ordovician Trilobite assemblage from the Lashkarak Formation, Dimghan area, northern Iran. Geobios, 40. Pour, M.G., et al. (2015). First reported Late Ordovician trilobites from the High Zagros Ranges, Iran: a biogeographic link between Gondwanan Chinese and Mediterranean Faunas. Geobios, xxx. (Article in Press) Rábano, I., J.C. Gutiérrez-Marco and D.C. García-Bellido (2014). A remarkable illaenid trilobite from the Middle Ordovician of Morocco. Bulletin of Geosciences, 89(2). Rábano, I., et al. (2010). Two more Bohemian trilobites from the Ordovician of Portugal and Morocco. Bulletin of Geosciences, 85(3). Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Fortey, R.A. (1997). Late Ordovician Trilobites from Southern Thailand. Palaeontology, Vol.40, Part 2.Lee, D.-C. (2013). Late Ordovician trilobites from the Xiazhen Formation in Zhuzhai, Jianxi Province, China. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(4). Pour, M.G., M. and S.T. Turvey (2009). Revision of some Lower to Middle Ordovician leiostegiid and associated trilobites from Iran and China. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 37. Zhou, Z.Q. and Z.-Y. Zhou (2006). Late Ordovician trilobites from the Zhusilenghaierhan area, Ejin Banner, western Inner Mongolia, China. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 32. Zhou, Z.-Y and Z.Q. Zhou (2007). The Late Ordovician cyclopygid trilobite Sagavia Koroleva, 1967, from the Pagoda Formation of southwestern Shaanxi, China. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Paleontologists, 34. Zhou, Z.-Y,, W.T. Dean and H. Luo (1998). Early Ordovician Trilobites from Dali, West Yunnan, China and Their Palaeobiological Significance. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 3. Zhou, Z.-Y. and W.T. Dean (1986). Ordovician Trilobites from Chedao, Gansu Province, North-West China. Palaeontology, Vol.29, Part 4. Zhou, Z.-Y,, et al. (1998). Ordovician Trilobites from the Dwangou Formation, Kalpin, Xinjiang, North-West China. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 4. Zhou, Z.-Y., et al. (1994). Cyclopygid Trilobites from the Ordovician of Northeastern Tarim, Xinjiang, Northwest China. Rec. West Aust.Mus., 16(4). Australia/New Zealand Campbell, K.S.W. and G.J. Durham (1970). A New Trinucleid Trilobite from the Upper Ordovician of New South Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.13, Part 4. Fortey, R.A. and J.H. Shergold (1984). Early Ordovician Trilobites Nora Formation, Central Australia. Palaeontology, Vol.27, Part 2. Shergold, J.H. (1975). Late Cambrian and Early Ordovician Trilobites from the Burke River Structural Belt, Western Queensland, Australia. Department of Minerals and Energy, Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, Australian Government Publishing Service, Bulletin 153, Vol.1 (text). Webby, B.D. (1974). Upper Ordovician Trilobites from Central New South Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 2. Webby, B.D. (1973). Remopleurides and Other Ordovician Trilobites from New South Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.16, Part 3. Webby, B.D. (1971). The Trilobite Pliomerina Chugaeva from the Ordovician of New South Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.14, Part 4. Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Ahlberg, P. (1989). Agnostid trilobites from the Upper Ordovician of Sweden and Bornholm, Denmark. Bull.geol.soc. Denmark, Vol.37. Ahlberg, P. (1989). Agnostid Trilobites from the Lower Ordovician Komstad Limestone Formation of Killerod, Scania, Sweden. Palaeontology, Vol.32, Part 3. Bergström, J., H. Pärnaste and Z. Zhiyi (2013). Trilobites and biofacies in the Early-Middle Ordovician of Baltica and a brief comparison with the Yangtze Plate. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 62(4). Bruton, D.L. (1976). The Trilobite Genus Phillipsinella from the Ordovician of Scandinavia and Great Britain. Palaeontology, Vol.19, Part 4. Bruton, D.L. (1968). The Trilobite Genus Panderia from the Ordovician of Scandinavia and the Baltic Areas. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol.48 Bruton, D.L. and A.W. Owen (1988). The Norwegian Upper Ordovician illaenid trilobites. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol.68. Budil, P. and J. Bruthansova (2005). Moulting in Ordovician Dalmanitoid and Acastoid Trilobites of the Prague Basin. Preliminary Observation. Geologica acta, Vol.3, Number 004. Budil, P., O. Fatka and J. Bruthansová (2003). Trilobite fauna of the Šárka Formation at Praha-Červený vrch Hill (Ordovician, Barrandian Area, Czech Republic). Bulletin of Geosciences, Vol.78, Number 2. Budil, P., et al. (2011). Arthrorhachis Hawle & Corda, 1847 (Agnostida) in the Prague Basin (Barrandian area, Czech Republic) revisited. Bulletin of Geosciences, 86(4). Budil, P., et al. (2010). Two unique Middle Ordovician trilobites from the Prague Basin, Czech Republic. Journal of the Natural History Museum (Prague), Vol.179(8). de Carvalho, C.N. (2006). Roller Coaster Behavior in the Cruziana rugosa Group from Penha Garcia (Portugal): Implications for the Feeding Program of Trilobites. Ichnos, 13. Dean, W.T. (1991). Ordovician trilobites from the inlier at Le Petit Fond d'Oxhe, Belgium. Bulletin De L'Institut Royal Des Sciences Naturelles De Belgique, Sciences De La Terre, 61. Dean, W.T. (1962). The Ordovician Trilobite Genus Tiresias M'Coy, 1846. Palaeontology, Vol.5, Part 2. Dean, W.T. (1959). Duftonia, a New Trilobite Genus from the Ordovician of England and Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.2, Part 1. Fatka, O., P. Budil and M. David (2015). Digestive structures in Ordovician trilobites Colpocoryphe and Flexicalymene from the Barrandian area of Czech Republic. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 64,4. Fatka, O., et al. (2013). Fossilized guts in trilobites from the Upper Ordovician Letna Formation (Prague Basin, Czech Republic). Bulletin of Geosciences, 88(1). Fortey, R.A. (1975). Early Ordovician trilobite communities. Fossils and Strata, Number 4. Fortey, R.A. (1975). The Ordovician Trilobites of Spitsbergen. II. Asaphidae, Nileidae, Raphiophoridae and Telephinidae of the Valhallfonna Formation. Norsk Polarinstitutt Skrifter, Number 162. Fortey, R.A. (1974). A New Pelagic Trilobite from the Ordovician of Spitsbergen, Ireland and Utah. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 1. Frisk, A. (2004). Trilobite biostratigraphy of the Tremadoc Bjorkasholmen Formation on Oland, Sweden. WOGOGOB-2004 Conference Materials. Gendry, D., et al. (2013). Contribution of Morphometrics to the Systematics of the Ordovician Genus Neseuretus (Calymenidae, Trilobita) from the Armorician Massif, France. Journal of Paleontology, 87(3). Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C., et al. (2009). Giant trilobites and trilobite clusters from the Ordovician of Portugal. Geology, Vol.37, Number 5. Hansen, T. (2010). Cyrtometopinid trilobites from the upper Volkhov and lower Lynna Formations (lower Darriwilian) of NW Russia. Bulletin of the Geological Society of Denmark, Vol.58. Hoel, O.A. (2009). The post-cephalic morphology of the middle Ordovician trilobite Prionocheilus narinosus from the central Oslo region, Norway. Norwegian Journal of Geology, Vol.89. Hutchison, R. and J.K. Ingham (1967). New Trilobites from the Tremadoc Series of Shropshire. Palaeontology, Vol.10, Part 1. Jaanusson, V. and L. Ramskold (1993). Pterygometopine Trilobites from the Ordovician of Baltoscandia. Palaeontology, Vol.36, Part 4. Kielan, Z. (1957). On the Trilobite Family Staurocephalidae. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol.II, Numbers 2-3. Koch, L. (2010). The trilobite fauna from the Ordovician of the Ebbe Anticline (Rhenish Massiv). SDGG-Heft 66, Geotop. MacGregor, A.R. (1963). Upper Llandeilo Trilobites from the Berwyn Hills, North Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.5, Part 4. Mergl, M. (2014). Odontopleurid trilobites of the Katian/Hirnantian boundary interval in the Prague Basin (Bohemia). Bulletin of Geosciences, 89(2). Mergl, M. (2006). Tremadocian Trilobites of the Prague Basin, Czech Republic. Acta Musei Nationalis Pragae, Series B, Historia Naturalis, 62(1-2). Mergl, M., O. Fatka and P. Budil (2008). Lower and Middle Ordovician Trilobite Associations of Perunica: From Shorface Endemicity to Offshore Uniformity (Prague Basin, Czech Republic). In: Advances in trilobite research. Rabano, I, R Gozalo and D. Garcia-Bellido (eds.). Cuadernos del Museo Geominero. Neuman, R.B. and D.L. Bruton (1989). Brachiopods and trilobites from the Ordovician Lower Hovin Group (Arenig/Llanvirn), Holonda area, Trondheim Region, Norway: new and revised taxa and paleogeographic interpretation. Nor.geol.unders.Bull., 414. Owen, A.W. (1981). The trilobite Mucronaspis in the uppermost Ordovician of the Oslo Region, Norway. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol.61. Owen, A.W. and R.A. Heath (1989). A revision of the upper Ordovician trilobite genus Erratencrinurus with a description of a new species from Hadeland. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol.69. Owen, A.W. and J.K. Ingham (1988). The Stratigraphical Distribution and Taxonomy of the Trilobite Onnia in the Type Onnian Stage of the Uppermost Caradoc. Palaeontology, Vol.31, Part 3. Owens, R.M. (1970). The Middle Ordovician of the Oslo Region, Norway 23. The Trilobite Family Proetidae. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol.50. Pärnaste, H. (2006). The Early Ordovician trilobite distribution and zonation of the East Baltic. Proc.Estonian Acad.Sci.Geol., 55(2). Pärnaste, H. (2004). Revision of the Ordovician cheirurid trilobite genus Reraspis with the description of the earliest representative.Proc. Estonian Acad. Sci. Geol., 53(2). Pärnaste, H. and J. Bergström (2014). Lower to Middle Ordovician trilobite faunas along the Ural border of Baltica. Bulletin of Geosciences, 89(2). Pärnaste, H. and A. Popp (2011). First record of Telephina (Trilobita) from the Ordovician of northeastern Estonia and its stratigraphical implications. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 60(2). Pärnaste, H., A. Popp and R.M. Owens (2009). Distribution of the order Proetida (Trilobita) in Baltoscandian Ordovician strata. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 58(1). Price, D. (1977). Species of Tretaspis (Trilobita) from the Ashgill Series in Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.20, Part 4. Price, D. (1974). Trilobites from the Sholeshook Limestone (Ashgill) of South Wales. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 4. Rábano, I., et al. (2010). Two more Bohemian trilobites from the Ordovician of Portugal and Morocco. Bulletin of Geosciences, 85(3). Romano, M. (1991). Trilobites from the Ordovician of Portugal. Palaeontology, Vol.34, Part 2. Romano, M. (1990). The Trilobite Protolloydolithus from the Middle Ordovician of North Portugal. Palaeontology, Vol.33, Part 2. Romano, M. (1980). The Trilobite Eccoptochile from the Ordovician of Northern Portugal. Palaeontology, Vol.23, Part 3. Romano, M. and J-L Henry (1982). The Trilobite Genus Eoharpes from the Ordovician of Brittany and Portugal. Palaeontology, Vol.25, Part 3. Romano, M. and A.W. Owen (1993). Early Caradoc Trilobites of Eastern Ireland and Their Palaeogeographical Significance. Palaeontology, Vol.36, Part 3. Rushton, A.W.A. (1988). Tremadoc Trilobites from the Skiddaw Group in the English Lake District. Palaeontology, Vol.31, Part 3. Sadler, P.M. (1974). Trilobites from the Gorran Quartzites, Ordovocian of South Cornwall. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 1. Suzuki, Y. (2002). Systematic position and palaeoecology of a cavity-dwelling trilobite, Ityophorus undulatus Warburg, 1925, from the Upper Ordovician Boda Limestone, Sweden. Paleontological Research, Vol.6, Number 1. Suzuki, Y. (2001). Revision of the late Ordovician trilobite Holotrachelus punctillosus (Tornquist, 1884) from Dalarna, Sweden. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 46(3). Temple, J.T. (1965). The Trilobite Genus Oedicybele from the Kildare Limestone (Upper Ordovician) of Eire. Palaeontology, Vol.8, Part 1. Tripp, R.P. (1965). Trilobites from the Albany Division (Ordovician) of the Girvan District, Ayrshire. Palaeontology, Vol.8, Part 4. Weir, J.A. (1959). Ashgillian Trilobites from Co. Claire, Ireland. Palaeontology, Vol.1, Part 4. North America Adrain, J.M. (2005). Aulacopleurid Trilobites from the Upper Ordovician of Virginia. Journal of Paleontolgy, 79(3). Adrain, J.M. and S.R. Westrop (2007). The hystricurid trilobite Metabowmania in the Lower Ordovician (Ibexian; Stairsian) of the Great Basin, Utah and Idaho, USA. Memoirs of the Association of Ausralasian Palaeontologists, 34. Adrain,J.M. and S.R. Westrop (2006). Bearriverops, a New Lower Ordovician trilobite genus from the Great Basin, western USA, and classification of the family Dimeropygidae. Can.J.Earth Sci., 44. Adrain, J.M. and S.R. Westrop (2006). A new genus of dimeropygid trilobites from the earliest Ordovician of Laurentia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 51(3). Adrain, J.M. and S.R. Westrop (2005). Lower Ordovician trilobites from the Baumann Fiord Formation, Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada. Can.J. Earth Sci., 42. Adrain, J.M., N.E.B. McAdams and S.R. Westrop (2009). Trilobite biostratigraphy and revised bases of the Tulean and Blackhillsian Stages of the Ibexian Series, Lower Ordovician, western United States. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 37. Adrain, J.M., et al. (2014). Trilobite biostratigraphy of the Stairsian Stage (upper Tremadocian) of the Ibexian Series, Lower Ordovician, western United States. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 45. Adrain, J.M., et al. (2003). Classification of the Trilobite Subfamilies Hystricurinae and Hintzecurinae Subfam.Nov., With New Genera from the Lower Ordovician (Ibexian) of Idaho and Utah. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 48(2). Adrain, J.M., et al. (2001). Systematics of the Ordovician Trilobites Ischyrotoma and Dimeropygiella, With Species from the Type Ibexian Area, Western U.S.A. J.Paleont., 75(5). Brett, C.E., et al. (1999). The Walcott-Rust Quarry: Middle Ordovician Trilobite Konservat-Lagerstätten. J.Paleont.,73(2). Carlucci, J.R. and S.R. Westrop (2012). Trilobite Biofacies Along an Ordovician (Sandbian) Carbonate Buildup to Basin Gradient, Southwestern Virginia. Palaios, Vol.27. Carlucci, J.R., S.R. Westrop and L. Amati (2010). Tetralichine Trilobites from the Upper Ordovician of Oklahoma and Virginia and Phylogenetic Systematics of the Tetralichini. J.Paleont., 84(6). Carlucci, J.R., et al. (2012). A systematic revision of the Upper Ordovician trilobite genus Bumastoides (Illaenidae), with new species from Oklahoma, Virginia and Missouri. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, Vol.10, Issue 4. Cisne, J.L. (1973). Beecher's Trilobite Bed Revisited: Ecology of an Ordovician Deepwater Fauna. Peabody Museum of Natural History, Postilla Number 160. Farrell, U.C., et al. (2009). Beyond Beecher's Trilobite Bed: Widespread pyritization of soft tissues in the Late Ordovician Taconic foreland basin. Geology, 37. (Thanks to piranha for finding this one!) Fortey, R.A. (1974). A New Pelagic Trilobite from the Ordovician of Spitsbergen, Ireland and Utah. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 1. Hall, C.P. (1993). Biometric and Taxonomic Analysis of the Genus Isotelus (Trilobita) from Cincinnatian (Upper Ordovician) Rocks of Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. Senior Bachelors Thesis - The Ohio State University. (Thanks to doushantuo for finding this one!) Hegna, T.A., M.J. Martin and S.A.F. Darroch (2017). Pyritized in situ trilobite eggs from the Ordovician of New York (Lorraine Group): Implications for trilobite reproductive biology. Geology, Vol.45, Number 3. Hunda, B.R. and N.C. Hughes (2007). Evaluating paedomorphic heterochrony in trilobites: the case of the diminutive trilobite Flexicalymene retrorsa minuens from the Cincinnatian Series (Upper Ordovician), Cincinnati region. Evolution & Development, 9:5. Hunda, B.R., N.C. Hughes and K.W. Flessa (2006). Trilobite Taphonomy and Temporal Resolution in the Mt. Orab Shale Bed (Upper Ordovician, Ohio, U.S.A.). Palaios, Vol.21. Lenz, A.C. and M.Churkin (1966). Upper Ordovician Trilobites from Northern Yukon. Palaeontology, Vol.9, Part 1. Loch, J.D. (2007). Trilobite Biostratigraphy and Correlations of the Kindblade Formation (Lower Ordovician) of Carter and Kiowa Counties, Oklahoma. Oklahoma Geological Survey, Bulletin 149. Ludvigsen, R. and B.D.E. Chatterton (2011). Ordovician Pterygometopidae (Trilobita) of North America. Can.J. Earth Sci., Vol.19(11). McAdams, N.E.B. and J.M. Adrain (2009). New pliomerid trilobite genus Lemureops from the Lower Ordovician (Ibexian, Tulean, Blackhillsian) of western Utah, USA. Memoirs of the Association of Australoasian Palaeontologists, 37. Ross, R.J. (1970). Ordovician Brachiopods, Trilobites and Stratigraphy in Eastern and Central Nevada. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 639. Ross, R.J. (1967). Calymenid and Other Ordovician Trilobites from Kentucky and Ohio. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 583-B. Stitt, J.H. (1983). Trilobites, Biostratigraphy, and Lithostratigraphy of the McKenzie Hill Limestone (Lower Ordovician), Wichita and Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma. Oklahoma Geological Survey, Bulletin 134. Swisher, R.E., S.R. Westrop, and L. Amati (2015). The Upper Ordovician trilobite Raymondites Sinclair, 1944 in North America. Journal of Paleontology, 89(1). Taylor, J.D. (1968). An Arkansas Trilobite from Lower Ordovician Rocks. Arkansas Academy of Science Proceedings, Vol.22. Taylor, M.E. and R.B. Halley (1974). Systematics, Environment and Biogeography of Some Late Cambrian and Early Ordovician Trilobites from Eastern New York State. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 834. Tremblay, J. (1989). Middle Ordovician (Whiterockian-Chazyan) Trilobites from the Sunblood Formation, District of Mackenzie. Masters Thesis - Brock University. Tripp, R.P. and W.R. Evitt (1986). Silicified Trilobites of the Family Asaphidae from the Middle Ordovician of Virginia. Palaeontology, Vol.29, Part 4. South/Central America/Caribbean Buitron, B.E. and E. Almazan-Vazquez (2007). Lithostratigraphy and the Early Ordovician Trilobite Ectenonotus westoni (Billings) from Las Norias Ranch, Sonora State, Mexico. In: 4th European Meeting on the Palaeontology and Stratigraphy of Latin America. Diaz-Martinez, E. and I. Rabano, eds. Edgecombe, G.D., et al. (1997). Ontogeny of the Proetoid Trilobite Stenoblepharum, And Relationships of a New Species from the Upper Ordovician of Argentina. J.Paleont., 71(3). Vaccari, N.E., et al. (2006). New raphiophorid trilobites from the Ordovician of Argentina and their biogeographic implications. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 32. General Ordovician Trilobites Order Agnostida Bruton, D.L. and H.A. Nakrem (2005). Enrolment in a Middle Ordovician agnostoid trilobite. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(3). Order Asaphida Darby, D.G. and E.C. Stumm (1965). A Revision of the Ordovician Trilobite Asaphus platycephalus Stokes.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XX, Number 3. Shiino, Y., et al. (2014). Pelagic or benthic? Mode of life of the remopleuridid trilobite Hypodicranotus striatulus. Bulletin of Geosciences, 89(2). Tanaka, G., et al. (2015). Vision in a Middle Ordovician trilobite eye. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 433. Whitworth, P.H. (1969). The Tremadoc Trilobite Pseudokainella impar (Salter). Palaeontology, Vol.12, Part 3. Order Corynexochida Adrain, J.M., T.S. Karim and S.R. Westrop (2014). The Early Ordovician (Floian) bathyurid trilobite genera Jeffersonia, Cullisonia and Bathyurina. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 45. Fortey, R.A. (1988). The Ordovician Trilobite Hadrohybus Raymond 1925, and Its Family Relationships. Peabody Museum of Natural History, Postilla Number 202. Order incerti ordinis Adrain, J.M., T.S. Karim and S.R. Westrop (2014). The Early Ordovician (late Tremadocian; Stairsian) dimeropygid trilobite Pseudohystricurus Ross. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 45. Order Phacopida Congreve, C.R. and B.S. Lieberman (2008). Phylogenetic and Biogeographic Analysis of Ordovician Homalonotid Trilobites. The Open Paleontology Journal, 1. Peers, S. (1997). The Taxonomy, Phylogeny and Palaeobiogeography of the Trilobite Families Pliomeridae and Encrinuridae: Reconstructing the Ordovician world using evolving lineages. Volume 1 and Volume 2 together. Ph.D. Thesis - University of Glasgow. (49MB download) Tripp, R.P. (1957). The Trilobite Encrinurus multisegmentatus (Portlock) and Allied Middle and Upper Ordovician Species.Palaeontology, Vol.1, Part 1. Tunnicliff, S.P. (1978). Types of the Ordovician Trilobites Celtencrinurus multisegmentatus (Portlock) and Cryptolithus latus Portlock. Palaeontology, Vol.21, Part 2. Order Proetida McCormick, T. and R.A. Fortey (2002). The Ordovician Trilobite Carolinites, A Test Case for Microevolution in a Macrofossil Lineage. Palaeontology, Vol.45, Part 2. Order Redlichiida Fortey, R.A. (2000). Olenid trilobites: The oldest known chemoautotrophic symbionts? PNAS, Vol.97, Number 12. General Ordovician Trilobites Adrain, J.M. (2013). Chapter 20. A synopsis of Ordovician trilobite distribution and diversity. In: Early Palaeozoic Palaeobiogeography and Palaeogeography. Harper, D.A.T. and T. Servais (eds.), Geological Society London, Memoirs, 38. Whittington, H.B. and C.P. Hughes (1973). Ordovician Trilobite Distribution and Geography. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Number 12.
  8. true or false?

    in German: Write-protected,so no outtakes! Acanthopyge,Selenopeltis,Acadoparadoxides,Cambropallas St. Petersburg trilobites seem to be subject to this blight as well Nice example: Dysplanus glued to an earlier Aseri-stage matrix!.Why?That matrix looked better,thus enabling the dealer to up the price! other: Paralejurus without terrace lines Tutorial_zum_ErkeTrilfakehungen.pdf
  9. Crustacean

    Found this little critter in a river bed in Grapevine Texas
  10. Help with arthropod ID

    I found this a while ago (back in February I think) and I initially identified it as a pill millipede. Well, I got back around to examining it and after some research online I'm no longer confident with that ID. It turns out that pill millipedes didn't exist as far back as the Mississippian, and even though millipede fossils are known from the area's Devonian rocks (like at Red Hill), none of their finds are similar to mine. I understand that time difference may play a role, but still they should look generally the same. This specimen is more rounded and "squat" then the Red Hill examples and other fossil millipede specimens, and has more robust tergites (segments) on its body. I still believe it is most likely an arthropod for a few reasons, one is that I still have yet to find any plant material from this layer, two because these rocks are early Mississippian in age an no plants that would look similar exist from this period in this region, and three is because the segments on it's body are too different from the growth lines of plants and appear to be part of an armored exoskeleton rather then the result of growth as in plants. Beyond this I have no real idea anymore. I have found a trigonotarbid before in this layer of shale, but even that specimen is not quite the same as this one. I'll try and get better pictures later today, right now all I have is this. If you look carefully enough, there appear to be faint impressions of some legs to it's one side.
  11. Help with identifying trilobite

    I have been told that this is the pygidium of a trilobite. If anyone is able to determine what species it is and when it lived, I would be extremely thankful! The fossil was found on the east coast of Sweden.
  12. Fuxianhuia protensa

    From the album Finest Chengjiang

    A wonder specimen with eyes preserved. Follow me on eBay: www.ebay.com/usr/marcray154
  13. Leanchoilia illecebrosa

    From the album Finest Chengjiang

    This is the only Leanchoilia I've ever seen with an appendage preserved! Quite a rarity. Follow me on eBay: www.ebay.com/usr/marcray154
  14. Naraoia spinosa

    From the album Finest Chengjiang

    A complete specimen of an iconic Chengjiang species. Details of limb imprints and digestive diverticula can be seen. Follow me on eBay: www.ebay.com/usr/marcray154
  15. Ancient arthropod with gnarly claws discovered in Burgess Shale Calgary Sun - ‎April 26, 2017‎ http://www.calgarysun.com/2017/04/26/ancient-anthropod-with-gnarly-claws-discovered-in-burgess-shale Paleontologists identify new 507-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincers, University of Toronto, April 26, 2017‎ https://www.utoronto.ca/news/ouch-u-t-paleontologists-identify-508-million-year-old-sea-creature-can-opener-pincers https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170426131024.htm This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a remarkable mouth Washington Post - ‎April 26, 2017‎ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/04/26/this-508-million-year-old-sea-predator-had-a-remarkable-mouth/?utm_term=.770085e2838c The paper is: Aria, C., and J.-B. Caron, 2017, Burgess Shale fossils illustrate the origin of the mandibulate body plan. Nature (2017) doi:10.1038/nature22080 https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature22080.html Yours, Paul H.
  16. ARTHROPOD?

    Hi everybody. It's been awhile. The last couple of years have seen my attention directed to areas other than old dead things. I need help with an ID. Found this locally, not far from the Silurian black shales that Reudeman discovered his Eurypterids in. I'm not sure of the geology as there have not been any geological surveys of this area. A couple of paleontologists seem to think it's Ordovician. I asked a number of paleontologists at the Paleontological Research Institute an the Museum of Natural History if this was organic or just a geologic anomaly. They weren't sure. I just feel that it looks "on purpose". Now you lucky dogs get a crack at it. Thanks. Tom
  17. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since April 22, 2017. Phylum Arthropoda Subphylum Trilobitomorpha Devonian Trilobites Africa/Middle East Burton, C.J. and N. Eldredge (1974). Two New Subspecies of Phacops rana [Trilobita] from the Middle Devonian of North-West Africa. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 2. Cronier, C., et al. (2013). First occurrence of a phacopid trilobite faunule from the Upper Devonian of Saoura Valley, Algeria and biodiversity implications. Geol.Mag., 150(6). Feist, R. (2002). Trilobites from the latest Frasnian Kellwasser Crisis in North Africa (Mrirt, central Moroccan Meseta). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 47(2). Hainaut, G. (2015). Study of the Taxonomy and the Inter and Intra Specific Variability of Phacopidae from the Lower Devonian of Algeria: Morphometric Approach and Meaning. Examensarbete vid Institutionen for geovetenskaper, ISSN 1650-6553 Nr 307. Klug, C., H. Schulz, and K. De Baets (2009). Red Devonian trilobites with green eyes from Morocco and the silicification of the trilobite exoskeleton. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 54(1). Lerosey-Aubril, R. and R. Feist (2005). Ontogeny of a new cyrtosymboline trilobite from the Famennian of Morocco. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(3). McKellar, R.C., et al. (2012). An unusual occurrence of Pedinopariops (Trilobita: Phacopidae) within siliclastic facies in the Devonian of Awaynat Wanin, Libya. Bulletin of Geosciences, 87(2). van Viersen, A.P. and D. Holland (2016). Morphological trends and new species of Cyphaspis (Trilobita, Otarioninae) in the Devonian of Morocco, Turkey, Germany and Belgium. Geologica Belgica, 19/3-4. van Viersen, A.P. and H. Heising (2015). Description of Kettneraspis? prescheri sp.nov. (Trilobita, Odontopleuridae) from the "couche rouge" (Pragian, Lower Devonian) in Morocco. Geologica Belgica, 18/1. van Viersen, A.P. and H. Prescher (2011). New Species of the Lichid Trilobite Ceratarges from the Middle Devonian in Morocco. Geologica Belgica, 14/3-4. Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Jinliang, Y. and X. Liwen. Trilobite fauna at the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary in South China (S-Guizhou and N-Guangxi). National Museum of Natural Science, Special Publication Number 8. Kobayashi, T. (1988). 26. The Devonian Trilobites from the Fukuji and Other Formations in Japan. Proc. Japan Acad., 64, Ser. B. Okazaki, Y. (1974). Devonian Trilobites from the Fukuji Formation in the Hida Massif, Central Japan. Memoirs of the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, Series of Geol. & Mineral., Vol.XL, Number 2. Australia/New Zealand Ebach, M.C. (2002). Lower Devonian trilobites from Cobar, New South Wales. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 20. Ebach, M.C. and G.D. Edgecombe (1999). The Devonian Trilobite Cordania from Australia. Journal of Paleontology, Vol.73, Number 3. Edgecombe, G.D. and A.J. Wright (2004). Silicified Early Devonian Trilobites from Brogans Creek, New South Wales. Proc.Linn.Soc. NSW, 125. Wright, A.J. and W. Haas (1990). A new Early Devonian spinose phacopid trilobite from Limekilns, New South Wales: morphology, affinities, taphonomy and palaeoenvironment. Records of the Australian Museum, 42(2). Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Berkowski, B. (1991). A blind phacopid trilobite from the Famennian of the Holy Cross Mountains. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 36(3). Bignon, A. and C. Cronier (2015). Trilobite faunal dynamics on the Devonian continental shelves of the Ardenne Massif and Boulonnais (France, Belgium). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 60(4). Budil, P. and F. Horbinger (2007). Exoskeletal structures and ultrastructures in Lower Devonian dalmanitid trilobites of the Prague Basin (Czech Republic). Bulletin of Geosciences, 82(1). Budil, P. and P. Kolar (2004). Kainops chlupaci sp.n. from the Lower Devonian (Zlichovian Stage) of the Prague Basin. Journal of the Czech Geological Society, 49/3-4. Budil, P., et al. (2014). Unusual occurrence of dalmanitid trilobites in the Lochkovian (Lower Devonian) of the Prague Basin, Czech Republic. Bulletin of Geosciences, 89(2). Chulpac, I. (1993). Trilobites from the Givetian and Frasnian of the Holy Cross Mountains. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 37(2-4). Feist, R. (2003). Biostratigraphy of Devonian tropidocoryphid trilobites from the Montagne Noire (Southern France). Bulletin of Geosciences, Vol.78, Number 4. Feist, R. (1999). First Mid-Devonian Trilobites from the Carnic Alps. Abh.Geol.B.-A., 54. Magrean, B. (2006). Revision of some Devonian trilobites from Belgium. The genera Astycoryphe, Tropidocoryphe, Eifliarges and Koneprusia. Bulletin De L'Institut Royal Des Sciences Naturelles De Belgique, Sciences De La Terre, 76. Osmolska, H. (1963). On Some Famennian Phacopinae (Trilobita) from the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. Acta Paleontologica Polonica, Vol.VIII, Number 4. Radwanski, A., A. Kin, and U. Radwanska (2009). Queues of blind phacopid trilobites Trimerocephalus: A case of frozen behavior of Early Fammenian age from the Holy Cross Mountains, Central Poland. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.59, Number 4. Taghon, P.G., E. Bonino and B. Mottequin (2012). A new representative of the lichid genus Ohleum (Trilobita) from the Eifelian (Middle Devonian) of southern Belgium. Geologica Belgica, 15/3. Van Viersen, A.P. (2008). First Record of the Odontopleurid Trilobite Koneprusia from the Lower Eifelian of Vireux-Molhain (Northern France), With Remarks on the Associated Trilobite Fauna. Geologica Belgica, 11. Van Viersen, A.P. (2007). Kettneraspis, Radiaspis and Ceratarges (Trilobita) from the Middle Devonian of the Rochefort area (Ardennes, Belgium). Scripta Geologica, 134. Van Viersen, A.P. and D. Holland (2016). Morphological trends and new species of Cyphaspis (Trilobita, Otarioninae) in the Devonian of Morocco, Turkey, Germany and Belgium. Geologica Belgica, 19/3-4. Van Viersen, A.P. and H. Prescher (2014). "Devil horned" Cyphaspis (Trilobita, Otarioninae): examples from the Middle Devonian of the Ardennes (Belgium), Eifel (Germany) and Ma'der (Morocco). Geologica Belgica, 17/3-4. Van Viersen, A.P. and A. Bignon (2011). Late Devonian (Frasnian) Asteropygine Trilobites from the Frasnes Area, Southern Border of Dinant Synclinorium, Belgium. Geologica Belgica, 14/3-4. Van Viersen, A.P. and B. De Wilde (2010). Goldius angusticalix sp.nov. (Trilobita, Scutelluidae) from the Couvin Formation (Middle Devonian) in Belgium, With a preliminary list of Scutelluid species from the Ardennes. Geologica Belgica, 13/3. Van Viersen, A.P., H. Prescher and J. Savelsbergh (2009). Description of two new trilobites from the Ahrdorf Formation (Middle Devonian) at the "Trilobitenfelder" of Gees, Eifel, Rhenish Mountains. Bulletin De L'Institut Royal Des Sciences Naturelles De Belgique, Sciences De La Terre, 79. Vaněk, J., V. Vokáč and F. Hӧrbinger (1992). New trilobites from the Silurian and Devonian in the Prague Basin (Central Bohemia). Věstník Českého geologického ústavu, 67, 2. North America Adrain, J.M. and G.J. Kloc (1997). Lower Devonian Aulacopleuroidean Trilobites from Oklahoma. J.Paleont., 71(4). Campbell, K.S.W. (1977). Trilobites of the Haragan, Bois d'Arc and Frisco Formations (Early Devonian) Arbuckle Mountains Region, Oklahoma. Oklahoma Geological Society, Bulletin 123. Eldredge, N. (1973). Systematics of Lower and Lower Middle Devonian Species of the Trilobite Phacops Emmrich in North America. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.151, Article 4. (20.74MB download) Eldredge, N. (1972). Systematics and Evolution of Phacops rana (Green, 1832) and Phacops iowensis Delo, 1935 (Trilobita) from the Middle Devonian of North America. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.147, Article 2. Esker, G.C. (1968). Colour Markings in Phacops and Greenops from the Devonian of New York. Palaeontology, Vol.11, Part 4. Lieberman, B.S. (1994). Evolution of the Trilobite Subfamily Proetinae Salter, 1864, and the Origin, Diversification, Evolutionary Affinity and Extinction of the Middle Devonian Proetid Fauna of Eastern North America. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 223. (180 pages, 50MB download) Roy, S.K. (1933). A New Devonian Trilobite from Southern Illinois. Geological Series of Field Museum of Natural History, Vol.VI. Stumm, E.C. (1968). Two Unusually Well-Preserved Trilobites from the Middle Devonian of Michigan and Ohio. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.22, Number 2. Stumm, E.C. (1967). Devonian Trilobites from Northwestern Ohio, Northern Michigan, and Western New York. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - University of Michigan, Vol. XXI, Number 6. Stumm, E.C. (1965). Two New Species of Trilobites from the Middle Devonian Silica Shale of Northwestern Ohio. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - University of Michigan, Vol. XIX, Number 13. Stumm, E.C.(1964). Silicified Trilobites from the Devonian Jeffersonville Limestone at the Falls of the Ohio. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - University of Michigan, Vol. XIX, Number 1. Stumm, E.C. (1954). Lower Middle Devonian Phacopid Trilobites from Michigan, Southwestern Ontario, and the Ohio Valley.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology, The University of Michigan, Vol.XI, Number 11. Stumm, E.C. (1953). Lower Middle Devonian Proetid Trilobites from Michigan, Southwestern Ontario and Northern Ohio. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - University of Michigan, Vol.XI, Number 2. Stumm, E.C.(1952). Trilobites of the Devonian Traverse Group of Michigan. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.X, Number 6. South America/Central America/Caribbean Adrain, J.M. and G.D. Edgecombe (1996). Devonian Aulacopleurid Trilobites of the Malvinokaffric Realm. Geobios, 29(4). de Carvalho, M.d.G.P. and J. Moody (2000). A Middle Devonian Trilobite Assemblage from Venezuela. American Museum Novitates, Number 3292. de Carvalho, M.d.G.P. and G.D. Edgecombe (1991). Lower-Early Middle Devonian Calmoniid Trilobites from Mato Grosso, Brazil, and Related Species from Parana. American Museum Novitates, Number 3022. de Carvalho, M.d.G.P., G.D. Edgecombe and L. Smith (2003). New Calmoniid Trilobites (Phacopina: Acastoidea) from the Devonian of Bolivia. American Museum Novitates, Number 3407. de Carvalho, M.d.G.P., et al. (1997). Devonian Calmoniid Trilobites from the Parnaiba Basin, Piaui State, Brazil. American Museum Novitates, Number 3192. Eldredge, N. and L. Branisa (1980). Calmoniid Trilobites of the Lower Devonian Scaphiocoelia Zone of Bolivia, With Remarks on Related Species. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.165, Article 2. (31 MB download) Liebermann, B.S. (1993). Systematics and Biogeography of the "Metacryphaeus Group" Calmoniidae (Trilobita, Devonian), With Comments on Adaptive Radiations and the Geological History of the Malvinokaffric Realm. J. Paleont., 67(4). Morzadec, P., et al. (2015). Trilobites and inarticulate brachiopods from the Devonian Floresta Formation of Colombia: a review. Bulletin of Geosciences, 90(2). Rustán, J.J. and N.E. Vaccari (2012). A revision of the Devonian Malvinokaffric dalmanitid trilobite Dalmanitoides Delo, 1935, on the basis of new data from Argentina. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.15, Issue 1. Rustán, J.J. and N.E. Vaccari (2012). The trilobite Maurotarion megacephalum sp.nov. (Aulacopleuridae) in the Lower Devonian of Argentina: phylogenetic and paleobiogeographic remarks. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geológicas, Vol.29, Number 2. Simoes, M.G., J. De Moraes Leme, and S.P. Soares (2009). Systematics, Taphonomy and Paleoecology of Homalonotid Trilobites (Phacopida) from the Ponta Grossa Formation (Devonian), Parana Basin, Brazil. Rev.bras.paleontol., 12(1). General Devonian Trilobites Cronier, C. and A. Francois (2014). Distribution patterns of Upper Devonian phacopid trilobites: Paleobiogeographical and paleoenvironmental significance. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 404. (Author's personal copy) de Carvalho, M.d.G.P. and da Fonseca, V.M.M. (2007). The Trilobite "Dalmanites" maecurua Clarke, 1890 and the New Genus Amazonaspis (Synphoriidae). American Museum Novitates, Number 3591. Edgecombe, G.D. (1991). Morocconites Struve, 1989, a Devonian Acastine Trilobite (Calmoniidae: Acastinae). American Museum Novitates, Number 2998. Feist, R. and R. Lerosey-Aubril (2005). The type species of Cyrtosymbole and the oldest (Famennian) cyrtosymboline trilobites. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(3). Lieberman, B.S. and G.J. Kloc (1997). Evolutionary and Biogeographic Patterns in the Asteropyginae (Trilobita, Devonian) Delo, 1935. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 232. Schoenemann, B., E.N.K. Clarkson and U. Ryck (2014). Colour Patterns in Devonian Trilobites. The Open Geology Journal, 8.
  18. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you . Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 27, 2017. Phylum Arthropoda - General Precambrian (Ediacaran) 'Arthropods' Glaessner, M.F. (1980). Parvancorina - an arthropod from the Late Precambrian (Ediacarian) of South Australia. Ann.Naturhist.Mus. Wien, 83. Cambrian 'Arthropods' Cambrian 'Arthropods' - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Fu, D.-J., X.-L. Jiang and D.-G. Shu (2011). Soft anatomy of the Early Cambrian arthropod Isoxys curvirostratus from the Chengjiang biota of South China with a discussion on the origination of great appendages. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 56(4). Fu, D.-J., X. Zhang and G.E. Budd (2014). The first dorsal-eyed bivalved arthropod and its significance for early arthropod evolution. GFF, Vol.136, Number 1. Fu, D.-J., et al. (2014). Ontogeny and dimorphism of Isoxys auritus (Arthropoda) from the Early Cambrian Chengjiang biota, South China. Gondwana Research, 25. Hou, X. and J. Bergstrom (1997). Arthropods of the Lower Cambrian Chengjiang fauna , southwest China. Fossils & Strata, Number 45. (Thanks to oilshale for locating this one!) Lin, J.-P., et al. (2006). A Parvancorina-like arthropod from the Cambrian of South China. Historical Biology, 18(1). Liu, Y., et al. (2016). Three-dimensionally preserved minute larva of a great-appendage arthropod from the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota. PNAS, Early Edition. Luo, H., et al. (2007). A New Arthropod, Guangweicaris Luo, Fu et Hu gen.nov. from the Early Cambrian Guanshan Fauna, Kunming, China. Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol.81, Number 1. Ma, X., et al. (2015). Preservational Pathways of Corresponding Brains of a Cambrian Euarthropod. Current Biology, 25. Ma, X., et al. (2014). An exceptionally preserved arthropod cardiovascular system from the early Cambrian. Nature Communications, 5:3560. Peng, J., Y.-L. Zhao and H.-J. Sun (2012). Discovery and significance of Naraoia from the Quiandongian (lower Cambrian) Balang Formation, Eastern Guizhou, South China. Bulletin of Geosciences, 87(1). (Thanks to piranha for finding this one!) Tanaka, G., et al. (2013), Chelicerate neural ground pattern in a Cambrian great appendage arthropod. Nature, Vol.502. Wu, Y., et al. (2016). Dimorphism of Bivalved Arthropod ?Branchiocaris yunnanensis from the Early Cambrian Chengjiang Biota, South China. Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol.90, Number 3. Zhang, X. and D. Shu (2007). Soft Anatomy of Sunellid Arthropods from the Chengjiang Lagerstätte, Lower Cambrian of Southwest China. J.Paleont., 81(6). Zhang, X., J. Han and D. Shu (2000). A New Arthropod Pygmaclypeatus daziensis from the Early Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte, South China. J.Paleont., 74(5). Cambrian 'Arthropods' - Australia/New Zealand Edgecombe, G.D., D.C. Garcia-Bellido and J.R. Paterson (201X). A new leanchoiliid megacheiran arthropod from the lower Cambrian Emu Bay Shale, South Australia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 5X(X). Lee, M.S.Y., et al. (2011). Modern optics in exceptionally preserved eyes of Early Cambrian arthropods from Australia. Nature, Vol.474(7353). Paterson, J.R., et al. (2008). Early Cambrian Arthropods from the Emu Bay Shale Lagerstätte, South Australia. In: Advances in trilobite research. Rabano, I., R. Gozalo and D. Garcia-Bellido (eds.), Cuademos del Museo Geominero, Number 9. Instituto Geologico y Minero de Espana, Madrid. Cambrian 'Arthropods' - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Chulpáč, I. and V. Kordule (2002). Arthropods of Burgess Shale type from the Middle Cambrian of Bohemia (Czech Republic). Bulletin of the Czech Geological Survey, Vol.77, Number 3. Dzik, J. and K. Lendzion (1988). The oldest arthropods of the East European Platform. Lethaia, Vol.21. Eriksson, M.E., et al. (2012). Internal Soft-Tissue Anatomy of Cambrian 'Orsten' Arthropods as Revealed by Synchrotron X-Ray Tomographic Microscopy. PLoS ONE, 7(8). Lamsdell, J.C., M. Stein and P.A. Selden (2013). Kodymirus and the case for convergence of raptorial appendages in Cambrian arthropods. Naturwissenschaften, 800. Stein, M. (2010). A new arthropod from the Early Cambrian of North Greenland, with a 'great appendage'-like antennula. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 158. Stein, M. (2008). Evolution and taxonomy of Cambrian arthropods from Greenland and Sweden. Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, 558. Stein, M., et al. (2013). Arthroaspis n.gen., a common element of the Sirius Passet Lagerstătte (Cambrian, North Greenland), sheds light on trilobite ancestry. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 13:99. Cambrian 'Arthropods' - North America Aria, C. and J-B. Caron (2015). Cephalic and Limb Anatomy of a New Isoxyid from the Burgess Shale and the Role of "Stem Bivalved Arthropods" in the Disparity of the Frontalmost Appendage. PLoS ONE, 10(6). Briggs, D.E.G. (1977). Bivalved Arthropods from the Cambrian Burgess Shale of British Columbia. Palaeontology, Vol.20, Part 3. Briggs, D.E.G. and R.A. Robison (1984). Exceptionally Preserved Nontrilobite Arthropods and Anomalocaris from the Middle Cambrian of Utah. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 111. Briggs, D.E.G., et al. (2008). Middle Cambrian Arthropods from Utah. J.Paleont., 82(2). Collette, J.H., J.W. Hagadorn and M.A. Lacelle (2010). Dead in Their Tracks - Cambrian Arthropods and Their Traces from Intertidal Sandstones of Quebec and Wisconsin. Palaios, Vol.25. Garcia-Bellido, D.C., J. Vannier, and D. Collins (2009). Soft-part preservation in two species of the arthropod Isoxys from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale of British Columbia, Canada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 54(4). Gould, S.J. (1991). The disparity of the Burgess Shale arthropod fauna and the limits of cladistic analysis: why we must strive to quantify morphospace. Paleobiology, 17(4). Lin, J.-P. (2009). Function and hydrostatics in the telson of the Burgess Shale arthropod Burgessia. Biology Letters, 5. Ortega-Hernandez, J. (2015). Homology of Head Sclerites in Burgess Shale Euarthropods. Current Biology, 25. Stein, M. and P.A. Selden (2011). A restudy of the Burgess Shale (Cambrian) arthropod Emeraldella brocki and reassessment of its affinities. Journal of Systematic Paleontology, iFirst 2011. General Cambrian 'Arthropods' Hendricks, J.R. and B.S. Lieberman (2008). New Phylogenetic Insights into the Cambrian Radiation of Arachnomorph Arthropods. J. Paleont., 82(3). Hendricks, J.R. and B.S. Liebermann (2007). Biogeography and the Cambrian radiation of arachnomorph arthropods. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 34. Hendricks, J.R., B.S. Lieberman and A.L. Stigall (2008). Using GIS to study palaeobiogeographic and macroevolutionary patterns in soft-bodied Cambrian arthropods. Palaeogeography, Palaeclimatology, Palaeoecology, 264. Legg, D.A. and J. Vannier (2013). The affinities of the cosmopolitan arthropod Isoxys and its implications for the origin of arthropods. Lethaia, Vol.46. Lin, J.-P. and D.E.G. Briggs (2010). Burgess shale-type preservation: a comparison of naraoiids (Arthropoda) from three Cambrian localities. PALAIOS, Vol.25. Ma, X., et al. (2012). Complex brain and optic lobes in an early Cambrian arthropod. Nature, Vol.490. Strausfeld, N.J. (2015). Palaeontology: Clearing the Heads of Cambrian Arthropods. Current Biology, 25. Strausfeld, N.J., et al. (2016). Arthropod eyes: The early Cambrian fossil record and divergent evolution of visual systems. Arthropod Structure & Development, 45. Vannier, J., et al. (2009). Arthropod visual predators in the early pelagic ecosystem: evidence from the Burgess Shale and Chengjiang biotas. Proc.R.Soc. B, 276. Waloszek, D., et al. (2005). Early Cambrian arthropods-new insights into arthropod head and structural evolution. Arthropod Structure & Evolution, 34. Zhang, X.-g. and B.R. Pratt (1994). Middle Cambrian Arthropod Embryos with Blastomeres. Science, Vol.266. Zhu, M.-Y., et al. (2004). Direct evidence for predation on trilobites in the Cambrian. Proc.R.Soc.Lond. B (Suppl.), 271. Ordovician 'Arthropods' Chulpáč, I. (1999). Some problematical arthropods from the Upper Ordovician Letna Formation of Bohemia. Journal of the Czech Geological Society, 44/1-2. Chulpáč, I. (1988). The Enigmatic Arthropod Duslia from the Ordovician of Czechoslovakia. Palaeontology, Vol.31, Part 3. Ortega-Hernandez, J., S.J. Braddy and S. Rak (2010). Trilobite and xiphosuran affinities for putative aglaspidid arthropods Caryon and Drabovaspis, Upper Ordovician, Czech Republic. Lethaia Seminar. Rak, S., J. Ortega-Hernandez and D.A.Legg (2013). A revision of the Late Ordovician arthropod Furca bohemica from Czech Republic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(3). (Thanks to piranha for finding this one!) Vannier, J., et al. (2003). Cosmopolitan arthropod zooplankton in the Ordovician seas. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 195. Silurian 'Arthropods' Briggs, D.E.G., et al. (2016). Tiny individuals attached to a new Silurian arthropod suggest a unique mode of brood care. PNAS, Vol.113, Number 16. Devonian 'Arthropods' Dunlop, J.A. (2002). Arthropods from the Lower Devonian Severnaya Zemlya Formation of October Revolution Island (Russia). Geodiversitas, 24(2). Lagebro, L. (2015). The Arthropod Assemblage of the Upper Devonian Strud locality and its Ecology. Ph.D. Dissertation - Uppsala Universitet. (Summary only) Tanaka, G., D.J. Siveter and M. Williams (2013). A new bivalved arthropod from the Devonian of Japan. Paleontological Research, Vol.17, Number 3. Carboniferous 'Arthropods' Atkinson, T.P. (2005). Arthropod Body Fossils from the Union Chapel Mine. In: Pennsylvanian Footprints in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama. Buta, R.J., A.K. Rindsberg, and D.C. Kopaska-Merkel (eds.), Alabama Paleontological Society Monograph Number 1. Haug, J.T., et al. (2014). Arthropod cuticles from the upper Visean (Mississippian) of eastern Germany. Bulletin of Geosciences, 89(3). Triassic 'Arthropods' Schmidt, A.R., et al. (2012). Arthropods in amber from the Triassic Period. PNAS, Vol.109, Number 37. Jurassic 'Arthropods' Charbonnier, S., et al. (2010). Ecological Significance of the arthropod fauna from the Jurassic (Callovian) La Voulte Lagerstätte. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 55(1). Miocene 'Arthropods' Pierce, W.D. and J. Gibron (1962). Fossil Arthropods of California, 24. Some Unusual Fossil Arthropods from the Calico Mountain Nodules. Bulletin. So. Calif. Academy Sciences, Vol.61, Part 3. Arthropod Origins and Evolution Bergstrom, J. and X.-G. Hou (2003). Arthropod origins. Bulletin of Geosciences, Vol.78, Number 4. Budd, G.E. (2001). Tardigrades as 'Stem-Group Arthropods': The Evidence from the Cambrian Fauna. Zool.Anz., 240(2001). Budd, G.E. and M.J. Telford (2009). The origin and evolution of arthropods. Nature, Vol.457. Edgecombe, G.D. and D.A. Legg (2014). Origins and Early Evolution of Arthropods. Palaeontology, 57(3). Edgecombe, G.D. and D.A. Legg (2013). 15. The Arthropod Fossil Record. In: Arthropod Biology and Evolution - Molecules, Development, Morphology. Minelli, A. G. Boxshall and G. Fusco (eds.), Springer-Verlag. Grosberg, R.K. (1990). Out on a limb: Arthropod Origins. Science, New Series, Vol.250, Number 4981. Haug, J.T., et al. (2011). Sarotrocercus oblitus - Small arthropod with great impact on the understanding of arthropod evolution? Bulletin of Geosciences, 86(4). Lozano-Fernandez, et al. (2016). A molecular palaeobiological exploration of arthropod terrestrialization. Phil.Trans.R.Soc.B, 371. Perrier, V., M. Williams and D.J. Siveter (2015). The fossil record and palaeoenvironmental significance of marine arthropod zooplankton. Earth-Science Reviews, 146. Pisani, D., et al. (2004). The colonization of land by animals: molecular phylogeny and divergence times among arthropods. BMC Biology, 2:1. Schwermann, A.H., et al. (2016). Preservation of three-dimensional anatomy in phosphatized fossil arthropods enriches evolutionary inference. eLife Sciences, 5(e12129). Williams, M., et al. (2011). Oxygen as a Driver of Early Arthropod Micro-Benthos Evolution. PLoS ONE, 6(12). Wolfe, J.M., et al. (2016). Fossil calibrations for the arthropod Tree of Life. Earth-Science Reviews, 160. Arthropod Anatomy/Morphology Bartram, K.M., A.J. Jeram and P.A. Selden (1987). Arthropod cuticles in coal. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol.144. Edgecombe, G.D., X. Ma and N.J. Strausfeld (2015). Unlocking the early fossil record of the arthropod central nervous system. Phil.Trans.Roy.Soc. B, 370. Ortega-Hernandez, J. and G. Budd (2016). The nature of non-appendicular anterior paired projections in Palaeozoic total-group Euarthropoda. Arthropod Structure & Development, xxx. (Article in Press) Ramskold, L., et al. (1996). Preservational folds simulating tergite junctions in tegopeltid and naraoiid arthropods. Lethaia, Vol.29. Strausfeld, N.J., X. Ma and G.D. Edgecombe (2016). Fossils and the Evolution of the Arthropod Brain. Current Biology, 26. Vannier, J., et al. (2016). Exceptional preservation of eye structure in arthropod visual hunters from the Middle Jurassic. Nature Communications, 7:10320. Waloszek, D., et al. (2007). Evolution of cephalic feeding structures and the phylogeny of Arthropoda. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 254. General Arthropods Chipman, A.D. (2015). An embryological perspective on the early arthropod fossil record. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 15:285. Legg, D.A. (2013). The Impact of Fossils on Arthropod Phylogeny. Ph.D. Thesis - Imperial College, London.Ortega-Hernandez, J. (2014). Making sense of 'lower' and 'upper' stem-group Euarthropoda, with comments on the strict use of the name Arthropoda von Siebold, 1848. Biological Reviews, 91(1). Palmer, D. (2010). Chapter 1. An introduction to the fossil arthropods of Great Britain. In: Fossil Arthropods of Great Britain. Jarzembowski, E.A., et al., Geological Conservation Review Series, Number 35, Joint Nature Conservation Committee, Peterborough. Perkovsky, E.E., et al. (2007). A comparative analysis of the Baltic and Rovno amber arthropod faunas: representative samples. African Invertebrates, 48(1). Racheboeuf, P.R., et al. (2008). The euthycarcinoid arthropods from Montceau-les-Mines, France: functional morphology and affinities. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 99. Shear, W.A. and J. Kukalova-Peck (1990). The ecology of Paleozoic terrestrial arthropods: the fossil evidence. Can.J.Zool., Vol.68.
  19. trilobite exuviation

    HBW on this one,N.B:link won't be here forever http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royptb/329/1252/27.full.pdf
  20. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since October 12, 2017. Phylum Arthropoda Subphylum Trilobitomorpha General Trilobites General Trilobites - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Kobayashi, T. (1987). On the Damesellidae (Trilobita) in Eastern Asia. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B., Vol.63, Number 3. Kobayashi, T. (1985). The Taihungshaniidae and Birmanitidae, Trilobita. Proc. Japan Acad., Series B., Vol.61, Number 1. Kobayashi, T. (1985). On the Dikelokephaliniidae (Trilobita). Proc. Japan Acad., Series B., Vol.61, Number 1. General Trilobites - Australia/New Zealand Adrain, J.M. and B.D.E. Chatterton (1995). The Otarionine Trilobites Harpidella and Maurotarion, With Species from Northwestern Canada, the United States, and Australia. J.Paleont., 69(2). General Trilobites - Europe (including Greenland) Crônier, C. (2003). Systematic relationships of the blind phacopine trilobite Trimerocephalus, with a new species from Causses-et-Veyran, Montagne Noire. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 48(1). Owens, R.M. (1974). The Affinities of the Trilobite Genus Scharyia, With a Description of Two New Species. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 3. Schoenemann, B. and E.N.K. Clarkson (2011). The Eyes of Bohemian Trilobites. Geol.Výzk.Mor.Slez., Brno, 2011/1. Shergold, J.H. (1966). A Revision of Acaste downinigae (Murchison) and Related Trilobites. Palaeontology, Vol.9, Part 2. General Trilobites - North America Adrain, J.M. and B.D.E. Chatterton (1995). The Otarionine Trilobites Harpidella and Maurotarion, With Species from Northwestern Canada, the United States, and Australia. J.Paleont., 69(2). Palmer, A.R. (1962). Glyptagnostus and Associated Trilobites in the United States. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 374-F. Ross, R.J. (1951). Stratigraphy of the Garden City Formation in Northeastern Utah, and its Trilobite Faunas. Peabody Museum of Natural History, Bulletin 4. Shrake, D.L. (2005). Ohio Trilobites. Ohio Department of Natural Resources, GeoFacts Number 5. Vogdes, A.W. (1892). On the North American Species of the Genus Agnostus. The American Geologist, Vol.IV. Walter, O.T. Trilobites of Iowa and Some Related Paleozoic Forms. Iowa Geological Survey. (Thanks to doushantuo for locating this one!) Weller, S. (1900). The Paleontology of the Niagaran Limestone in the Chicago Area. The Trilobita. The Natural History Survey, Bulletin Number 4, Part II. (178 pages, 26.6MB download) General Trilobites Adrain, J.W. and S.R. Westrop (1999). Trilobite Paleobiology: Past, Present and Future. J.Paleont., 73(2). Alles, D.L. (ed.) (2006). Trilobites. PDF version of on-line paper. Numerous pictures. Bonino, E. (2006). Systematic Relationships and Chronological Extent of the nine Trilobite Orders. (POSTER in .pdf format) Brezinski, D.K. (2003). Evolutionary and Biogeographical Implications of Phylogenetic Analysis of the Late Palaeozoic Trilobite Paladin. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Number, 70. Chlupáč, I. (1975). The distribution of phacopid trilobites in space and time. Fossils and Strata, Number 4. Clarkson, E.N.K. (1973). The Eyes of Asaphus raniceps Dalman (Trilobita). Palaeontology, Vol.16, Part 3. Clarkson, E.N.K. (1967). Fine Structure of the Eye in Two Species of Phacops (Trilobita). Palaeontology, Vol.10, Part 4. Clarkson, E., et al. (2006). The Eyes of Trilobites: The oldest preserved visual system. Arthropod Structure & Development, 35. Congreve, C.R. and B.S. Lieberman (2011). Phylogenetic and Biogeographic Analysis of Sphaerexochine Trilobites. PLoS ONE, 6(6). (Read on-line or download a copy.) Congreve, C.R. and B.S. Lieberman (2010). Phylogenetic and Biogeographic Analysis of Deiphonine Trilobites. Journal of Paleontology, 84(1). Crônier, C. (2013). Morphological Disparity and Developmental Patterning: Contribution of Phacopid Trilobites. Palaeontology, 2013. Daley, A.C. and H.B. Drage (2015). The fossil record of ecdysis, and trends in the moulting behaviour of trilobites. Arthropod Structure & Development, xxx. (Article in Press). Dalingwater, J.E. and J. Miller (1977). The Laminae and Cuticular Organization of the Trilobite Asaphus raniceps. Palaeontology, Vol.20, Part 1. Drage, H.B. and A.C. Daley (2016). Recognising moulting behaviour in trilobites by examining morphology, development and preservation: Comment on Blazejowski et al. 2015. BioEssays, 38. Fortey, R.A. (2004). The Lifestyles of Trilobites. American Scientist, Vol.92. Fortey, R.A. (2000). Olenid trilobites: The oldest known chemoautotrophic symbionts? PNAS, Vol.97, Number 12. Fortey, R.A. (1990). Ontogeny, Hypostome Attachment, and Trilobite Classification. Palaeontology, Vol.33, Part 3. Fortey, R.A. and R.M. Owens (1997). Bubble-headed Trilobites, and a new Olenid Example. Palaeontology, Vol.40, Part 2. Fortey, R.A. and B.D.E. Chatterton (1988). Classification of the Trilobite Suborder Asaphina. Palaeontology, Vol.31, Part 1. Fortey, R.A. and S.F. Morris (1978). Discovery of Nauplius-Like Trilobite Larvae. Palaeontology, Vol.21, Part 4. Fusco, G., et al. (2011). Developmental Trait Evolution in Trilobites. Evolution, 66-2. Fusco, G., et al. (2004). Exploring Developmental Modes in a Fossil Arthropod: Growth and Trunk Segmentation of the Trilobite Aulacopleura konincki. The American Naturalist, Vol.163, Number 2. Gon, S.M. (2009). A Pictorial Guide to the Orders of Trilobites. Henningsmoen, G. (1951). Remarks on the Classification of Trilobites. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, 29. Hughes, C.P. (1970). Statistical Analysis and Presentation of Trinucleid (Trilobita) Fringe Data. Palaeontology, Vol.13, Part 1. Hughes, C.P. and A.J. Wright (1970). The Trilobites Incaia Whittard, 1955 and Anebolithus Gen. Nov. Palaeontology, Vol.13, Part 4. Hughes, N.C. (2003). Trilobite Tagmosis and Body Patterning from Morphological and Developmental Perspectives. Integr. Comp. Biol., 43. Hughes, N.C. (2003). Trilobite body patterning and the evolution of arthropod tagmosis. Bioessays, 25.4. Hughes, N.C., A. Minelli and G. Fusco (2006). The ontogeny of trilobite segmentation: a comparative approach. Paleobiology, 32(4). Hughes, N.C., R.E. Chapman and J.M. Adrain (1999). The stability of thoracic segmentation in trilobites: a case study in developmental and ecological constraints. Evolution & Development, 1:1. Lieberman, B.S. and T.S. Karim (2010). Tracing the trilobite tree from the root to the tips: A model marriage of fossils and phylogeny. Arthropod Structure and Development, 39. McCormick, T. (1995). Patterns and Implications of Stasis in Trilobites. Ph.D. Thesis - Glasgow University. Minelli, A., G. Fusco and N.C. Hughes (2003). Tagmata and Segment Specification in Trilobites. Special Papers in Palaeontology, 70. Opik, A.A. (1961). Alimentary Caeca of Agnostids and Other Trilobites. Palaeontology, Vol.3, Part 4. Rabano, I., R. Gozalo and D. Garcia-Bellido (2008). Advances in Trilobite Research. Institito Geologico y Minero Espana, Madrid. (entire 449 page book) Schoenemann, B., E.N.K. Clarkson and G. Horvath (2015). Why did the UV-A-induced photoluminescent blue-green glow in trilobite eyes and exoskeletons not cause problems for trilobites? PeerJ, 3:e1492. St. John, J. (2007). The Earliest Trilobite Research (Antiquity to the 1820s). In: Fabulous Fossils - 300 Years of Worldwide Research on Trilobites. Mikulic, D.G. (ed.), Illinois State Geological Survey. Shergold, J.H. (1977). Classification of the Trilobite Pseudagnostus. Palaeontology, Vol.20, Part 1. Shergold, J.H. (1967). A Revision of Acastella spinosa (Salter 1864) With Notes on Related Trilobites. Palaeontology, Vol.10, Part 2. Slavickova, J. and P. Kraft (2001). Remarks on the palaeoecology of agnostid trilobites. Journal of the Czech Geological Society, 46/3-4. Størmer, L. Studies on Trilobite Morphology. Part III. The Ventral Cephalic Structures With Remarks on the Zoological Position of the Trilobites. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, 29. Størmer, L. Studies on Trilobite Morphology, Part II. The Larval Development, the Segmentation and the Sutures, and Their Bearing on Trilobite Classification. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, 21. Størmer, L. Studies on Trilobite Morphology. Part I. The Thoracic Appendages and Their Phylogenetic Significance. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, 19. Størmer, L. (1980). Sculpture and Microstructure of the Exoskeleton in Chasmopinid and Phacopid Trilobites.Palaeontology, Vol.23, Part 2. Thomas, A.T. (1977). Classification and Phylogeny of Homalonotid Trilobites. Palaeontology, Vol.20, Part 1. Thomas, A.T. and R.M. Owens (1978). A Review of the Trilobite Family Aulacopleuridae. Palaeontology, Vol.21, Part 1. Webster, M. and M.L. Zelditch (2008). Integration and Regulation of Developmental Systems in Trilobites. In: Advances in trilobite research. Rabano, I., R. Gozalo, and D. Garcia-Bellido (eds.). Whittington, H.B. (1996). Sphaeroidal Enrolment and Thoracic Characters in Beltella depressa and Other Olenid Trilobites. Palaeontology, Vol.39, Part 2. Wilmot, N.V. (1990). Biomechanics of Trilobite Exoskeletons. Palaeontology, Vol. 33, Part 4. Wilmot, N.V. and A.E. Fallick (1989). Original Mineralogy of Trilobite Exoskeleton. Palaeontology, Vol.32, Part 2.
  21. Diplichnites gouldi

    From the album Ichnofossils

    This is a trace attributed to a myriapod athropod (centipede or millipede). It is on the obverse side as the Nanopus prints in the previous image.
  22. Leanchoilia

    From the album Anomalocaris and friends.

    Leanchoilia, the four-eyed arachnomorph arthropod from the Chengjiang biota, Yunnan, China. Lower Cambrian, 520-525mya. Very good preservation but sadly the front end is missing.
  23. Branchiocaris

    From the album Anomalocaris and friends.

    A Branchiocaris from the Lower Cambrian Chengjiang biota. This critter was a free swimming arthropod. Also featured in the Simpsons episode, "Lisa the Skeptic".
  24. Guangweicaris abdomen

    From the album Anomalocaris and friends.

    The abdomen and part of the thorax of the Guangweicaris spinatus from the Guanshan Fauna (Lower Cambrian, 520-525myo). The spines and stinger on the end are very detailed. Also, a tiny trilobite pygidium is included!
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