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Found 91 results

  1. Hey everyone, I just got back from an amazing trip to Utah and Nevada collecting a host of trilobites. I am going to try and post some photos of that trip in the next day or so. I never seem to be able to find the time anymore! This find was pretty much the trip maker for non trilobite finds. I found this soft tissue arthropod in the house range in rocks known to have Burgess Shale fauna. So far this doesn’t seem to line up with anything I’ve seen in the Burgess. I’ve had 2 suggestions on an identification. Canadaspis perfecta is the best guess so far however there are glaring differences. The similarities to Canadaspis would have me thinking this could still be related (family or genus level?) as it shares the same body plan but with different proportions. The other suggestion was Eldonia but I’m far more skeptical of that. to me this is clearly some type of arthropod with a distinct head, carapace, body segments and legs. If it has a name I don’t seem to have the reach in my research tools to figure it out. The gut tract is also preserved in this specimen too. This has been confirmed by reputable sources so that also makes this even more wild of a specimen. If this turns out to be something unknown to science that would sure be a surprise....we seem to have slapped names on almost everything at this point lol. here is a photo of the slightly more detailed side. Here is a little diagram showing anatomy. searching desperately for my scale bar (eye roll emoji lol).....one I find a good scale I’ll put up another photograph. It’s only about an inch or prolly 3-4cm tip to tip in a straight line not measuring the curve of the animal. If anyone with Burgess Shale knowledge or some deep pocket knowledge on Cambrian arthropods want take a guess, let me know what you think! Al
  2. Nautiloid

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Eutrephoceras sp. Cretaceous C and D Canal Delaware City, Delaware Mt Laurel Fm.
  3. Plate of Eurypterus and Pterygotus parts

    From the album Nautiloid’s Eurypterids and other Silurian fossils

    Assorted Eurypterus remipes and Pterygotus sp. parts Upper Silurian Bertie Group Fiddlers Green Formation Phelps member collected 8/22/20
  4. Large partial Eurypterid cephalon

    From the album Nautiloid’s Eurypterids and other Silurian fossils

    Eurypterus remipes partial cephalon Upper Silurian Bertie Group Fiddlers Green Formation Phelps Member Herkimer County, New York Collected 8/22/20

    © Owen Yonkin 2020

  5. Hi Forum members, Yesterday I went to a spot in Herkimer County in search of Eurypterids! This spot exposed the Fiddlers Green Formation of the Upper Silurian Bertie Group. I had never found a Eurypterid so I was excited to go, and I had heard this was a productive spot. I got there and the first rock I looked at had an exploded eurypterid on it! There were eurypterid bits and pieces all over the place. Eurypterids seemed to be much more abundant at this spot than I thought they would be! I only got to stay there for a half an hour but managed to track down a few nice finds. The rock at this locality is hard like concrete and is pretty much impossible to split (especially the freshly weathered out material). All of my finds came from surface collecting in the weathered out rocks. Thanks for looking! Owen
  6. Rhinocaris valve

    From the album Phyllocarids

    Rhinocaris columbina Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Upper Ludlowville Formation Brookfield, New York Collected 7/18/20
  7. Rhinocaris valve imprint

    From the album Phyllocarids

    Rhinocaris columbina Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Upper Ludlowville Formation Brookfield, New York Collected 7/18/20
  8. 3D Rhinocaris telson

    From the album Phyllocarids

    Rhinocaris columbina Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Upper Ludlowville Formation Brookfield, New York Collected 7/18/20
  9. Complete Rhinocaris

    From the album Phyllocarids

    Rhinocaris columbina Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Moscow Formation Windom Shale Deep Spring Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  10. Echinocaris from Brookfield, New York

    From the album Phyllocarids

    Echinocaris punctuata Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Upper Ludlowville Formation Brookfield, NY Collected 7/18/20
  11. Another fossil found by amateurs makes the news. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-06-28/citizen-scientist-finds-460-million-year-old-fossil/12397700
  12. Trilobite help

    I received this fossil from a family friend to help with an assignment I am required to do, however, to complete it I need the taxonomy of the specimen. if anyone can help me with the species name for this fossil that will be greatly appreciated. (it was found in the Yass, NSW area for reference)
  13. Hi, Just wanted to ask if this listing is correct in regards to the identification. It is listed as the fossil head of the Anomalocaridid genus Aegirocassis. It is said to be from the Lower Fezouata Formation in Morocco dated about 480mya - so i believe the locality is correct for the species. Thanks in advance!
  14. I am hoping someone can help me with this large unknown trilobite. It was given to me many years ago (late 1980s) by my father, along with some other trilobites and other fossils, as a Christmas gift. He acquired the fossils from a member of the local fossil club (Delaware Valley Paleontological Society) and most were carefully labeled, but this one was missing its label. It is a large, partially enrolled trilobite (15 cm from "nose" to tail if unrolled and 6.5 cm at the widest point); there are small bumps down the middle of the thorax and on the glabellum. It is on a chunk of matrix that lets it stand on its own, and it is a cool display piece. But looking at it closely, it looks...wrong. There's not much detail on the eyes (which seems to be usual in fakes, but can also mean a poorly-prepped real specimen) and overall it just looks wrong, in a way that I can't quite articulate (which again could mean fake, or badly-prepped but real). So, my questions are: 1. Is this, in your opinion, a real trilobite that was badly prepped, or a fake? I would appreciate if you can point out specific features that lead you to your decision. 2. If it is real, can you hazard a guess as to genus/species, and (this is a stretch) where it might come from? The scrape marks on the matrix resemble what I've seen on some Moroccan specimens. However, the other trilobites it was sold with are all from the United States, except for one from Pakistan (!), if that means anything. I think this trilobite resembles Calymene in general shape and size, but I don't know much about trilobites (if that wasn't already obvious) and I could easily be wrong. Thanks in advance for any help you can give. Let me know if additional photos would help- my photography isn't great, but I'll do the best I can.
  15. Carboniferous Cyclus

    These are 7 of my best Cyclus from the Coal Measures of Derbyshire UK that i have collected over many years they range in size from 20mm to 12mm. I find these arthropods fascinating John.
  16. Since last year, I was starting hunting down all types of Bristolia genus. I am so fascinating about its shape. Here represents all the species I have acquired: Bristolia bristolensis (Resser 1928) Types: USNM 78390, the lectotype (defined in Palmer and Repina 1993); paralectotypes USNM 78391 and 78392. Bristolia bristolensis had originally been recognized (e.g., Riccio 1952; Palmer and Halley 1979; Palmer and Repina 1993) as a highly variable species, particularly in the condition of the intergenal and genal spine angles. However, Lieberman (1998) used univariate measurements and statistical analyses to define a well-constrained B. bristolensis based on Resser’s (1928) lectotype, and demonstrated that what had traditionally been treated as a broadly variable B. bristolensis was actually two different species. The species referred to as Bristolia n. sp. in Lieberman (1998) is described here as B. harringtoni n. sp. Bristolia bristolensis has the intergenal angle deflected at an 80 to 95 degree angle relative to a transverse line and the genal spine angle is variably developed opposite and/or between the distal tips of S2 and S3. In B. harringtoni the intergenal angle is deflected at a 50 to 65 degree angle relative to a transverse line and the genal spine angle is developed variably opposite the distal tip of S2 or the medial part of L1. Occurrence: California: the Carrara Formation, in the lower Bristolia zonule, upper part of the Olenellus zone, Early Cambrian, following Nelson (1976) and Palmer and Halley (1979), in the Grapevine, Funeral and Resting Spring ranges, the White-Inyo/Death Valley region, and in the Latham Shale, Marble Mountains, 190 m W of the limestone quarry, 0.5 mi E of Cadiz, in the Mojave Desert portion of San Bernardino County, possibly equivalent to Hazzard’s (1933) locality M-5, treated as in the Bristolia zonule. The above content comes from paper: Systematic Revision of the Olenelloidea (Trilobita, Cambrian) Bulletin 5 of the Peabody Museum of Natural History Yale University 18 October 1999 New Haven, Connecticut Bristolia Insolens (Resser, 1928) Bristolia cf. parryi
  17. Thelxiope like creature from Fezouata Shale, described by Peter Van Roy 2013. It looks very similar to the Burgess one: Thelxiope palaeothalassia LINK: https://burgess-shale.rom.on.ca/en/fossil-gallery/view-species.php?id=123
  18. Here presents three rare arthropods acquired from Fezouata Shale: Brachyaglaspis singularis gen. et sp. nov., which is described in 2015 for the first time. The paper is: 'A new aglaspidid euarthropod with a six-segmented trunk from the Lower Ordovician Fezouata Konservat-Lagerstätte, Morocco'. The first shows pretty nice outline of this aglaspidid, the third one is quite crappy...Fourth picture is the reconstruction of this type.
  19. Calling Bug People!

    I bought this bit of Madagascar copal a year ago, then finally got a decent microscope to see the bugs this week. They are less than a mm each. Now I'm stumped. I am a certified *modern* naturalist. I know something about insects. This one fits all the defining characteristics of an adult insect - probably Coleoptera - except that I only see four legs and may or may not have had antennae at some point. The heads are not very clear at any angle. On the bottom view, there are nubs at the end of the abdomen that *could* be legs, but that is the wrong place for insect legs. On the side views, it looks like there might be legs folded backward, as is common with some beetles, but the underside view also does not show any attachment points where there might have been legs that broke off. Any paleo-entomologists out there to point out what I am clearly missing in these pictures?
  20. Preserved Cambrian Brain

    Nevermind that the authors got the age wrong by a factor of 1000! They thought it was 500,000 years old but they say Cambrian so I guess it is 500 million years old. https://news.google.com/articles/CAIiEGCPp7KKbJYVK8AnXN7shMsqGQgEKhAIACoHCAowrq6BCzCw9PwCMMjF7gU?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US%3Aen
  21. Plant or Arthropod?

    I found this in West Yorkshire (UK) in the Pennine Lower Coal Measures formation (upper Carboniferous). I suspect it is plant, but it also looks like some arthropod fragments I have seen. What do you think? Thanks, Daniel
  22. trilobite anatomy

    here ACTA AD RES NATURAE ESTONICAE PERSCRÜTANDAS EDITA A SOCIETATE REBUS NATURAE INVESTIGANDIS IN ÜN1VERSITATE TARTUENSI CONST1TUTA I SER.: GEOLOGICA, CHEMICA ET PHYSICA VOL. XI, FASC. 1/2,1936 ÜBER DAS PANDERSCHE ORGAN BEI DEN ASAPHIDEN DES OSTBALTISCHEN ORDOVICIUMS VON p. siegfried,tartu about 94 MB "transliteration": On the Panderian Organ of East-Baltic Asaphids Sprache:Deutsch Langue:Allemand Language :German Starts from: PDF page 29 Some care with the taxonomy MIGHT be in order,given the age of the piece above:"schematical figurations of the undersides of right-side pleurae in the Ordovician Baltoc of Estonia"
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