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Found 30 results

  1. Ceratiocaris or Slimonia?

    Hi all. I have this specimen i bought fra a dealer in western europe It's from the Lesmahagow in scotland. I bought it as a Slimonia, but was later advised on facebook that it's in fact a ceratiocaris. What do you guys here think? I'm pretty convinced it's a ceratiocaris. What confuses me is that the dealer is quite experienced and he collected it himself decades ago, and got it id'ed by the museum in Edinburgh
  2. Early permian tracks and trails

    Went for a bush walk today and found some beautiful track ways. These tracks and trails are part of the early permian, Ecca group, prince Albert formation. I don't really pay much attention to tracks, but these where just out of this world (for me atleast) and was definitely the find of this extremely hot day. These pictures do not do these fossils justice... Zoom in and enjoy.
  3. Hey everyone, I’ve been meaning to get this post up for a few days but I’ve been dealing with my poor cat inky (Sweetheart of a cat) who is on her final day of life today. I will have to put her down November 1st. Very sad time as she’s been my companion the last 13 years. I’m sure many can relate. I’ll try to keep the chatter short and just get up as many photos I can for you kind people on the forum to enjoy. I just got back recently from an amazing trip to Utah and Nevada (Oct/11/2020-Oct/18/2020) Where I was camping in the field and trilobite collecting for 6 days straight. It was a very rewarding trip but it also required some serious gusto and hard work in the field. This type of collecting I did isn’t for the faint of heart with many days stacked on top of each other. With that I’ll try to get to the photos cause we all know that’s what we wanna see. These will consist of mostly field shots of finds during the first moments after discovery. My prep lab is under construction and it’ll be a couple months before I can start prepping these amazing bugs. First time to Utah requires pictures upon arrival. This was home....the nights got very cold and the days were comfortable but dry and sometimes kinda hot. Avoided some serious heat so I was lucky. This time of year is a little more forgiving in the desert. field shots incoming! It may take a hour or 2 to get them up.
  4. What Calymene Species Are These?

    Hello again everyone. These are two of my favorite fossils, both Calymene spp. The first one was owned by my teacher for his biology classroom until he agreed to sell it to me because I had grown to love it. Unfortunately, as you can see, its cephalon is very damaged so that makes it more difficult to tell what it is. I know that it's definitely a Calymene, but I'm wondering which species, if possible to tell. In my own personal research, I found that I believed he most closely resembled a Calymene tristani? but I am very much an amateur and am not sure on that. If anyone could give me some more input despite his relatively poor condition, I'd appreciate it. This second one I purchased online, and was sold as a Calymene sp. from Morocco. It is quite a bit smaller than the first one and its body appears more compressed, for lack of a better word?, which leads me to believe it's a different species. It is also significantly better preserved. Is this Moroccan species simply unnamed, or is there a more specific name out there that I'm unable to find? Thanks in advance, everyone :-)
  5. Hey everyone! Back at it again. This time I’ll keep it a little shorter and get to the fossils. I made it back out into the field last weekend and visited DSR and Cole Hill on Sunday 3/29/20 with fellow forum goer @DrDave. Usually we shake hands on our hellos and goodbyes like any two people would. It was odd not giving the usual greetings with a friend and keeping distance during social interaction. Almost feels rude it’s a weird feeling. You almost have to say “sorry I can’t touch you” so you don’t seem rude lol. Unusual times we must adjust to. Anyway. At DSR I have been kinda working an area that has been rewarding me over and over. Either I’m working a productive interval OR I am simply working an area that is easy to flip slabs therefore yielding more specimens. To actually know I would have to dig seriously at different levels and see what I find. There was actually and obnoxious amount of talus on top of this and I had to rake with a purpose to get it cleared up. FIRST slab I pulled up....do you see it? Same picture zoomed in a little....see it now? Same picture zoomed in more...see it now? I wiped off some mud and took another photo....this is why phyllocarids get missed. They don’t really pop when you first find them. I scour every rock very carefully and even then they aren’t exactly jumping out of the shale. I’ve found some of my BEST specimens in other peoples garbage piles. I’ve have found spectacular specimens this way. I knew I had a beautiful Rhinocaris double carapace and I could see something curious sticking out the end but I wanted to clean it up before I made assumptions on my observations. I actually found several phyllocarid specimens on this day . I’m going to share some of the process I go through cleaning and cutting choice specimens and show the final results! stay tuned
  6. Hi All. I was unsure where to put this message so hopefully this place is okay. I teach 7th grade Life Science and we are soon starting our coverage of major animal types (arthropods, echinoderms, molluscs, chordtates, etc). I am hoping to put together a teaching collection that can be used each year as we do this. If there are members here who are willing to donate any/all types of durable specimens (harder for young teens to destroy) that could be used to teach students the key features of these phyla. If you are willing and able to share can you please PM me directly. I do appreciate it :-)
  7. I had a rough work week last week with Central New York experiencing major flooding. It forced me to work the weekend and kinda ruined my fossil hunting thoughts. I only worked half a day Saturday 11/02/19 so I took advantage of what little sunlight I had. I had to be home before 5 to go to the mall with my wife to return some soccer shoes.......married life lol. With travel time I figured out I could go to DSR and get 70-80 minutes to fossil hunt! I needed this to de-stress so I went for it . I didn’t get much time but I tried to make it count. I knew I wasn’t going to be doing any major digging due to the lack of time. My plan was to try and keep working slabs I pulled from the interval I keep finding phyllocarids. When I got there I saw a large area to the left of where I worked that was ripped up with slabs around. It was the same interval and layers as the productive ones I worked 30 feet away. I wish I recorded the moment because I literally said out loud “I’m going to find a phyllocarid in these discards”.......walked 2 steps and found this in the discard pile.... here is a field shot....I was excited and terrified cause I realized I just found a Rhinocaris columbina phyllocarid with both carapaces and the telson but the telson is on the counterpart!! I thought I was going to have another fish that got away story but then I finally found the other half after an agonizing 40 minutes. Remember I didn’t have long haha. here is a field shot of the other half. Telson top left. I got a call from work and I was literally on the phone working and fossil hunting when I found the other half and silently cheered then continued my phone conversation here is a photo of the raw uncut slabs I collected from the field. I have a saw now so I’m not as concerned with reducing in the field as I used to be. Here are some photos of the finished product. This is a really exciting find because of the amazing association of both carapaces AND the telson. Really an informative specimen. It also came from the same interval I’m finding other phyllocarids. The very delicate disarticulation of the one carapace and slight spread of all the phyllocarid parts makes me very curious about the paleo setting. This is a photo of an artists recreation of a Silurian phyllocarid I found on google. This is not a Rhinocaris columbina but it does have some similarities that will help people visualize what a Rhinocaris may look like. this little something I circled had me wondering if it was possibly associated with this phyllocarid. Almost seems like a little appendage but there is really no way of knowing for sure I suppose. Interesting either way. thanks for reading! Not a whole lot just a single find that I think is really awesome . A quick little DSR trip (11/02/19) with a nice reward! Al
  8. Hey everyone! I finally had a day to go out and enjoy a Saturday fossil hunting with no time limit!! I decided to check 2 middle Devonian locations that have yielded nice dipleura specimens in the past. I’m still looking for “that one” specimen....eventually I’ll find one. I didn’t find the trilobite I tasked myself to find but I did find awesome stuff on Saturday . So here is a little trip report from Saturday September 28, 2019 plus some extra stuff I found earlier in the month. I’ll throw it in at the end. I got up really early so I could get to Cole Hill by sunrise. I had 2 sites in mind from the start. My new house is now only 30 minutes away from CHR which was a nice surprise! Early morning view I’ve had some tough outings at Cole Hill. This rock is so hard!!! I’ve tried clearing overburden just to get to more immovable rock. Anytime I get things moving I find something decent so that was the goal. Find rock that moves!! I ended up finding a spot way off the main outcrop and I got to work. I immediately found a plate with 5 cephalons!! It’s not being very photogenic so I took a picture after making them wet. the right shot shows 4 cephalons stacked in between the white scale bars....the left one shows the 5 hidden cephalon that Is under another cephalon. The bottom piece is just a cheek but could continue I’m not sure. Not very photogenic but rare to find an assemblage like that. I was able to find an area with more weathered rock and I found around a dozen cephalons!!! These are the better and bigger ones. I have a few nice juveniles but they are half covered in rock. I liked these 2 a lot. The left one is very 3D (also came in 10 pieces lol) and the right one has all the cephalon margins intact!! some nicer pygidiums I found. I found 7-10 total in various conditions. I found a lot of associated fauna as well!! The Gastropods came from mostly one bedding plane. The same spot I found the cephalon hash plate these were not far behind littered all over. I also found a bunch of bivalves! Way more than I usually do. I collected more on this trip than I have in the past. The rock kept moving and I kept finding!! After I worked the shelf back far enough I decided I wasn’t going to try and find a new spot. 4 hours of collecting and it was time to go to Deep Springs Rd. Even though I didn’t find exactly what I was after I found lots of amazing specimens compared to past trips . Kept my finder crossed that DSR would be as kind. DSR next post.....
  9. Hey everyone! It’s been a crazy busy June, July and beginning of August for me! I just finished moving into my house and I just got married on August 9th so my life has been a tornado. As a result I haven’t been able to comment, participate and keep up with all you fine folks on the forum like I usually do. I was still able to get out collecting here and there and I met up with fellow forum member @DrDave and did some exploring for the lower Devonian eurypterid Erieopterus. I won’t report on that until I have something to share. I think me and Dave found the right horizon now I just gotta search till I find something. Anyway I’m just gonna share the highlights from 3 trips to Briggs rd and 3 trips to DSR and a bonus day at Penn Dixie. Ill do the highlights from Trips on 6/30 7/06 and 7/28 to Briggs rd first. I found some pretty important specimens. Briggs rd is a very interesting site and you can find 3 different species of trilobites here. The Eldredgeops is the most common by far but the greenops and dipleura have made some appearances. This has got to be my most impressive greenops in a long time. This is actually a complete specimen!! The pygidium is tucked underneath. I have the right eye safe in a small ziplock bag. It came off in the counterpart and I saved it to try and glue back when I get the nerve. here’s a picture of the back. I have the counterpart for the pygidium and I’ll need to glue and prep if I want it perfect. Some of the material is attached to the counterpart. Im really excited about this specimen because the quality is good enough to compare with the greenops from DSR and Buffalo area. These eastern New York greenops are considered an undescribed species so I’m glad I have something quality I can use to really eye out the differences. After @Darktooth and his rock club went to Briggs I happened to be there the next day and found this awesome half specimen of a large dipleura! When I got there I found the body segments in 2 pieces and they looked like they went together. After awhile I came across the counterpart in rubble and realized “where is the cephalon?!” I went nuts looking for it with no luck then decided to try and pry a pieces of the wall off and BOOM! The cephalon was still in the outcrop lol. Super lucky. This was my best dipleura from Briggs so far. I’ve found some nice partials but this is the best I’ve found so far. @DrDave was kind enough to gift me this perfect un weathered cephalon. This specimen came from very fresh rock and is nearly perfect. I told Dave I’ve been trying to collect some quality cephalons from Briggs for comparison. I’ve noticed most specimens are usually missing a well preserved exoskeleton. This makes it hard to really compare with the western New York Eldredgeops that grow much much smaller. It’s interesting to me that the greenops are considered a different species and the Eldredgeops are not as you go east across New York State. I’m not here claiming everything is a new species only pointing out the discrepancies in species distribution across the state. Somehow the greenops change species as you go east while the Eldredgeops rana stays the same across the state. It’s not like the Eldredgeops from the east and west are identical either. The eastern New York Eldredgeops can grow to 3 inches! Just food for thought. I think about weird stuff like this a lot ha. anyway...here’s a close up of the undamaged cephalon. A tiny amount of with with an air abrasive and the eye detail will be perfect. here’s and example of a typical Briggs rd cephalon. The eye lenses are very 3D and preserve well even when the exoskeleton is weathered away. It’s hard getting a fresh specimen. just a couple nice cephalopods courtesy of Briggs rd. I love trilobites but I appreciate a quality cephalopod should a complete on present itself lol. Next is DSR highlights! Phyllocarids on the menu
  10. Hello everyone! I found this specimen also in a creek on a walk through a local park north of Pittsburgh. Thinking it may be a burrow fossil, but if it is, was wondering if there is an actual scientific name for it, so I know how to file it away accordingly under the proper name. Found the term Cruziana online, and wondering if this would qualify. Does anyone have any opinions? Or, if it is a burrow, is there any way of narrowing down what might have made it i.e. trilobites/arthropods etc? Details: 1) Found in isolation/there were no other similar pieces nearby. 2) Measures about 8-12 inches long. Burrow notches are about the width of a penny. 3) Again, found in Carboniferous territory in Western Pennsylvania found in a creek. Thanks everyone!
  11. What kind of arthropods are these?

    What do you think these are? Sorry, this is the only picture, and there is literally 0 information, so just your best thoughts from what you see here. I'll update any info if I can.
  12. until
    Featured Speaker: Our speaker will be Dr. Rodney Feldmann. Although retired from the Kent State University faculty, Dr. Feldmann continues to teach graduate-level courses in paleontology, directs graduate students in that area, and conducts grant-funded research. The title of his talk will be "What the heck are cyclids?" https://www.kent.edu/geology/profile/rodney-feldmann
  13. https://www.haaretz.com/science-and-health/MAGAZINE-tiny-babies-of-prehistoric-giant-shrimp-were-ferocious-killers-too-1.6150981
  14. https://phys.org/news/2018-05-major-fossil-emergence-early-animal.html
  15. L.S., Last Sunday, I found the specimen shown below on a spoil tip in northern France (Westphalian C, Late Carboniferous). The three photographs were made under different lighting conditions, in an attempt to illustrate the small scale characters of the about 8 mm-long fossil. It appears to be an abdomen (opisthosoma), perhaps of a trigonotarbida spider or some other arthropod. However, since 'beasties' are definitely not my strongsuit, I would really appreciate your suggestions and help to get this little one identified properly. Thanks, Tim
  16. http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/earliest-evidence-of-parental-care-found-in-520-millionyearold-fossil/
  17. Old news

    As far As I could ascertain, not posted yet edit: Amazing Czech Open-Access Pdf Library on this very forum Posted by Piranha in 2013 you live & learn Šnajdr M. (1983): Revision of the trilobite type material of I.Hawle and A. J. C. Corda, 1847 Sborník Národního muzea v Praze, řada B - Přírodní vědy 39 (3): 129. [PDF fulltext] NB 35, Mb or thereabouts TAXONOMY warning:This is from 1983,remember!!
  18. Bug wings

    I know figuring out the IDs of bug wings can be very difficult, but if anyone on here can help I'd greatly appreciate it! I've found these and some others (that I put somewhere I would definitely remember) near Humboldt, Nebraska in the Indian Cave sandstone member of the Towne Formation which puts their age late Pennsylvanian to early Permian. To be completely honest I've wondered if a couple of them might actually be leaf impressions, but I'll let y'all help me figure that out.
  19. Books Arthropods Canada

    Book Freebies for someone in Canada. Working my way through clutter. I've boxed up some publications on Trilobites and other arthropods...to give away. Some my doubles, others in 'ok' condition. Various ages. Set of journals on German Devonian/Carboniferous trilobites. Used but decent shape. Some notes in margins. No need to compensate me for postage but I ask that you make a equivalent donation of the postage to your local SPCA or Animal shelter. Likely about $30 postage. Note...I will send these as a group to someone with an 'expressed interest' in the subject of Upper paleozoic arthropods or Carboniferous 'stuff''. If I dont respond, they are spoken for. PM only, please.
  20. walter

    http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1260&context=igsar
  21. Cambrian lagerstatt,Burgess type

    Did a quick perusal of the forum and came to the conclusion that this paper might be new to all of you. If not,I apologize beforehand to the previous poster BTW,the source publications has a reputation to uphold.Read it,by all means Cargaineslage.pdf
  22. Festive occasion

    Good issue of one of my alltime favorite German publication series.Text is in German. Abbreviated contents Alberti on German trilobites(!!!!),alas no line drawings or photographs of specimens Groos on ostracods(paleoz) Foram teratologies a pretty funky and often cited piece by Walliser on the Runzelschicht of ammonites.Required reading!!!! miscellaneous structural geology and petrology http://www.geomuseum.uni-goettingen.de/museum/publications/images/GAGP/pdf/GAGP_Nr 5_Festschrift_Martin_Henno.pdf
  23. famous arthropods

    NB.:LARGE!! NNB.:get it while you can(edit:works to nov.6th) http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royptb/272/920/537.full.pdf
  24. Flexicalymene granulosa

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Flexicalymene granulosa, Mimico creek, Toronto, Ontario. Georgian Bay formation, late Ordovician. Complete specimen still embedded in the shale. Will need prep work to be exposed. I found this one at a collapsed cliff of shale at Mimico creek. I found some flexi's this summer at Mimico creek but usually whole specimens start crumbling apart the moment I try removing the matrix around the specimens.

    © (©)

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