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Found 13 results

  1. Lee Creek unknown

    I recently bought some Lee Creek spoils matrix from @PaleoRon & have been digging through it here & there. This morning among the usual teeth, mouth plates & vertebrae I found this. No idea what it is. Sort of small.. 4 mm x 5 mm in size with one side covered with rings. Any ideas? The backside is just lumpy more than anything.
  2. Glicymeris americanus

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Glicymeris americanus Bivalve Probably James City Formation; found Aurora, North Carolina, USA Lower Pleistocene (2.588 ± 0.005 and 0.781 ± 0.005 million years ago) Glycymeris, common name the bittersweet clams, is a genus of saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the family Glycymerididae. These clams are very common in the fossil state, from Cretaceous period in the Valanginian age (from 112.6 to o 0.012 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Glycymeris includes about 100 extinct species. The shells are generally biconvex, with equal valves round in outline, and slightly longer than wide. Their size varies from medium to large. The external ligament lacks transverse striations. These clams are a facultatively mobile infaunal suspension feeders. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Subclass: Pteriomorpha Order: Arcoida Family: Glycymerididae Genus: Glycymeris Species: americanus
  3. Glicymeris americanus

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Glicymeris americanus Bivalve Probably James City Formation; found Aurora, North Carolina, USA Lower Pleistocene (2.588 ± 0.005 and 0.781 ± 0.005 million years ago) Glycymeris, common name the bittersweet clams, is a genus of saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the family Glycymerididae. These clams are very common in the fossil state, from Cretaceous period in the Valanginian age (from 112.6 to o 0.012 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Glycymeris includes about 100 extinct species. The shells are generally biconvex, with equal valves round in outline, and slightly longer than wide. Their size varies from medium to large. The external ligament lacks transverse striations. These clams are a facultatively mobile infaunal suspension feeders. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Subclass: Pteriomorpha Order: Arcoida Family: Glycymerididae Genus: Glycymeris Species: americanus
  4. Glicymeris americanus

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Glicymeris americanus Bivalve Probably James City Formation; found Aurora, North Carolina, USA Lower Pleistocene (2.588 ± 0.005 and 0.781 ± 0.005 million years ago) Glycymeris, common name the bittersweet clams, is a genus of saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the family Glycymerididae. These clams are very common in the fossil state, from Cretaceous period in the Valanginian age (from 112.6 to o 0.012 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Glycymeris includes about 100 extinct species. The shells are generally biconvex, with equal valves round in outline, and slightly longer than wide. Their size varies from medium to large. The external ligament lacks transverse striations. These clams are a facultatively mobile infaunal suspension feeders. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Subclass: Pteriomorpha Order: Arcoida Family: Glycymerididae Genus: Glycymeris Species: americanus
  5. Glycimeris americanus 2a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Glicymeris americanus Bivalve Probably James City Formation; found Aurora, North Carolina, USA Lower Pleistocene (2.588 ± 0.005 and 0.781 ± 0.005 million years ago) Glycymeris, common name the bittersweet clams, is a genus of saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the family Glycymerididae. These clams are very common in the fossil state, from Cretaceous period in the Valanginian age (from 112.6 to o 0.012 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Glycymeris includes about 100 extinct species. The shells are generally biconvex, with equal valves round in outline, and slightly longer than wide. Their size varies from medium to large. The external ligament lacks transverse striations. These clams are a facultatively mobile infaunal suspension feeders. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Subclass: Pteriomorpha Order: Arcoida Family: Glycymerididae Genus: Glycymeris Species: americanus
  6. Glycimeris americanus 2a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Glicymeris americanus Bivalve Probably James City Formation; found Aurora, North Carolina, USA Lower Pleistocene (2.588 ± 0.005 and 0.781 ± 0.005 million years ago) Glycymeris, common name the bittersweet clams, is a genus of saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the family Glycymerididae. These clams are very common in the fossil state, from Cretaceous period in the Valanginian age (from 112.6 to o 0.012 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Glycymeris includes about 100 extinct species. The shells are generally biconvex, with equal valves round in outline, and slightly longer than wide. Their size varies from medium to large. The external ligament lacks transverse striations. These clams are a facultatively mobile infaunal suspension feeders. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Subclass: Pteriomorpha Order: Arcoida Family: Glycymerididae Genus: Glycymeris Species: americanus
  7. One more - Barnacle question

    This nice barnacle I believe is genus Blannus - Is that correct? DR
  8. Final ones for today!

    Are #1-2 a Conus gastropods? And #3-4, Turritella perexilis? Many thanks for looking! I am trying to re-learn so much! DR
  9. Fossil ID confirmation, please

    Are these Astrangia lineata? They are from Aurora, North Carolina - Miocene. Thanks for your attention!
  10. Chub? Angustidens? Meg?

    Saw this for sale and I'm thinking about buying it, the seller has it as "Carcharocus Megalodon" so obviously doesn't know exactly what it is. I am suspicious that it could be a chubutensis, and I am looking for one at a low price (this one is cheap) it's from the Aurora site btw. Any Ideas?
  11. Lee Creek Mine tooth ?

    Hi Guys, I'm looking at this tooth on an auction site and curious about the provenance. Sellers sometimes get their material from elsewhere , and the location information for them is murky, so nailing down the localities for SC and NC teeth is like ..... well, like pulling teeth really. This seller has said that this is an Auriculatus tooth from Lee Creek phosphate mine. Since I think the formation is too young for a ric, my assumption would be chubutensis. I have seen chub teeth from Lee Creek with very prominent cusps. Though this one doesn't seem right. The morphology of the tooth seems like it may be a SC/NC Angustidens ? I'm mainly looking at the slight re-curve beneath the cusps on the roots but I know that can't always be a good diagnostic tool. These are the only shots I have. Thanks, Brett PS. With the location in question I know that a positive ID is almost impossible but I thought I'd give it a shot. @sixgill pete
  12. Aurora Fossil Fest write-up

    Hi all! I've joined some time ago, but am terrible at actually posting. I'm not sure if this is the best place to post this, but over Memorial Day weekend @Boesse and I traveled to Aurora, NC for the 24th annual Aurora Fossil Fest! We saw multiple collections from people in the North Carolina Fossil Club, including finds from the Lee Creek Mine. We were there representing the Mace Brown Museum of Natural History, and we wrote a blog post up on it! http://blogs.cofc.edu/macebrownmuseum/2017/06/02/friday-fossil-feature-2017-aurora-fossil-fest/ I don't know everyone's handles on this board, but I know @sixgill pete , @SailingAlongToo, @aerogrower, @Al Dente, @Jniederkorn, @Daleksec were all there! Sorry if I've missed someone, feel free to let me know handles of people I missed
  13. Will anyone be attending the fossil festival this weekend?
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