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Found 138 results

  1. Hello, I have summarized my hunting trips to St. Bartholomä from July 2019 to September 2019. Its in German and located at an external site: Rudists St. Bartholomä - July-Sept 2019 (external site) (pdf, ca. 4.2 MB) Fell free to delete this post if you find it inappropriate. Thanks! Franz Bernhard
  2. Hello, at Tuesday, 10/01/2019, I made my first visit to the area around St. Josef, Western Styria, Austria ("Florianer Schichten", Langhian-Miocene) since about 11 months. I checked out 6 sites in 5 hours, three of them were made public by me 2-3 years ago: Fuggaberg-3-a Fuggaberg-3-b (This one was also published in a local journal 2 years ago.) Hoellerkogel-4 Bramberg-1 All sites had easy surface pickings of small fossils from debris. Outcropping sediment with fossils is exposed in 5 of them, in one you have to dig a little bit (Fuggaberg-3), but its still easy going. I guess I have collected and seen about 40 mollusc species within these 5 hours. So, the situation around St. Josef is still very good (if you like miocene molluscs and small fossils, though ). I am starting with: Fuggaberg-3 Two fossil-rich outcrops are located in a very small creek, about 15 m apart (W and E, 1st row, left). At E, only the fossil-poor overlying sediments are exposed at the moment (1st row, right, the red object is about 12x6 cm large), but digging in the debris below (2nd row, right) yielded some fossil-rich matrix specimens. You can see the yield of this 10-minute dig in the pic of the 3rd row, right. Of special interest are the two small fossils lying on oyster shells (coral and muricid). The debris 1-3 meters below the outcrop contains many loose fossils, eg. Granulolabium bicinctum (2nd row, left) or Terebralia bidendata (3rd row, left). Nearly the same situation at W, only overlying sediment is exposed (4th row, left). In the debris below, below the red object, many small fossils are lying around (4rd row, right). You can see Granulolabium bicinctum, Terebralia bidendata, Turritella partschi, Sphaeronassa shoenni, Acanthocardia paucicostata and a bi-valve Anadara diluvii; only the last one is not lying at its original position but was put there for photo purposes . Continued...
  3. Hello, today I had another opportunity to fossil hunt in St. Bartholomä. I tidied mostly up my main dig and collecting site in the quarry at Point 25 east of Kalchberg. As expected, I did not find much, only some small so-so specimens (19 specimens in 3 hours, but the majority would be rejects). However, in the same small quarry, a few meters to the north of the main dig site, "Knödelbrekzie" is also exposed (upper part of lower right pic), with some steep scree below. I have found two good rudists in this scree two years ago. Today, I dug again with bare hands in the scree. First without any success. Sure, every piece was fossiliferous limestone, but even not a rudist fragment among them. But then, only a few minutes before I had to leave, it was there! Just pulled out of the dark hole to the left of the specimen: A slender, slightly bend Vaccinites vesiculosus. The apex is broken off (pillars are visible there) and it is also broken at the top end, but it is quite aesthetic and elegant, that´s at least my thinking . I like it very much! Ok, back to work : This is the main dig site at point 25 as of today, 09/24/2019. There are no longer many clasts of fossiliferous limestone in the scree, mostly sandstone and marl. The orange bucket in the upper left pic contains clasts of fossiliferous limestone, the black bucket waste material (marl and sandstone). Today I have removed 23 buckets (10 Liter) of waste and 3 buckets of fossiliferous limestone from the dig site. Scale bar is 1 m. In the lower left pic, piles of fossiliferous limestone are visible, the waste material is dumped to the left (not visible). In the lower left corner, cutting rejects are deposited. At the right edge of the lower right pic, fragments and partials of rudist are deposited. This was probably my last hunting trip to St. Bartholomä for some time. I would like to do more prospecting and light surface collecting during my next trips. I am not really the born digger, I like prospecting more, but sometimes, I just have to dig . Thanks for looking! Franz Bernhard
  4. Hello, Another hunting trip for rudists to the Campanian of St. Bartholomä in western Styria, Austria (09/15/2019). I have hunted these heaps of stones, collected from the former nearby fields (now meadows) over centuries, several times before, but there seems to be always something to find. I found six "good" specimens in 2 hours - and that´s exactly my usual yield in this formation . First topo map, geological map, relief map and aerial photograph of "Point 32". No problem to make everything public, nobody is interested in this stuff (well, except me...). Views from my parking place and from the way to the heaps: Some impressions of the heaps. First row is the western, lowermost end of the east-west trending with a small dig. A small, but quite nice radiolitid from this hole is to the left of the pocket knife. A second radiolitid was also found there. Second row shows some parts of the upper, north-south trending heaps. Third row shows to the left a fragment of a Hippurites nabresinensis (nearly in-situ, a small part was exposed). To the right, a freshly exposed, but still nearly in-situ Vaccinites is visible to the right of the red object; a small part of this rudist was also already exposed. Its the area shown in the pic above. Well, no pocket knife, already lost...
  5. Hello, this time, I will start with the end result : I am quite satisfied with the result ! The pillars are nicely preserved and the rudist is filled with sparry, white to orange calcite and contains some voids coated with tiny calcite crystals. The greenish batches consist also of calcite and are also well polished, but are finer grained and contain additionally some small quartz grains. These fillings may be related to the second filling event during redeposition of the rudists in this formation. For more info about that, see here: Some Rudists from St. Bartholomä The right section contains also a blob of fossiliferous limestone. More about the locally heavily bored shell - see below . Before I got this nice result, there was a decision - to cut or not to cut : It is a conical specimen with some ribs preserved and a large, interesting, vertical groove. A large blob of limestone is sitting at the top end of the rudist, but one pillar was also already visible there. Mostly due to the ugly limestone blob, I decided to cut the specimen near the end of the visible shell. The top part (AN4240) does not contain much shell, the section about 6 mm lower (AN4239) does. The vertical groove is a simple inflection of the shell. No clue, what caused it, no remains of any other shell are visible. But it may have been some kind of an obstacle there. The specimen was found in a steep, wooded area east of Kalchberg, at the lower end of an old vertical ditch, possibly a prospect for water. Some pieces of fossiliferous limestone were lying around, somewhat exposed by heavy rains. I dug with bare hands in the soil, and nearly immediately recovered the specimen above from the "rat hole" to the right of the pocket knife (first row): (At the upper left corner of the upper left pic, a rudist is sticking between tree roots. This rudist was already featured here: Rudist hunting (3) in St. Bartholomä) Yesterday, I visited this spot again and pulled out several more pieces of limestone and sandstone from this "rat hole" (about 200 pieces), again only with bare hands (second row). No large Vaccinites was found this time, put a few smaller specimens (third row): upper left: small Vaccinites specimen; upper right: small pseudocolony of Hippurites colliciatus; lower left: Hippurites nabresinensis; lower right: fragment of Vaccinites vesiculosus. Ok, not much to see on this sucking pics, so I will stop now . Thanks for looking, maybe you have at least enjoyed the polished specimen . Happy hunting! Franz Bernhard
  6. Another completely unknown to me from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation, Gosau-group, Eastern Alps: They were found in a polished slab of one of the typical fossiliferous limestone clasts of the Rudist-bearing "Knödelbrekzie" of this formation. There are many of these unknowns in this specimen, but not so well preserved as (A); they are mostly only fragments and also often strongly recrystallized (below C). The two elongated, greenish, inhomogeneous blobs in the right part of the specimen seem to be the same, containing crushed and poorly preserved fragments similar to (A). It could be, that there is some branching involved. Maybe this is also the case with the two green, interconnected, circular blobs to the right of the elongated blobs. One of these circular blobs contains remnants of the fossil in question. One of the unknwons has some corallite-like structures (C), but I don´t think, its a coral. However, there seem to be also some real corals in this specimen (D). I am totally at a loss, what A, B, C etc. could be. Possibilities see title, but it could be even something different. Every hint is appreciated, it´s ok if you only know the phylum . Remark: All of the phyla listed in the title are know (mentioned, not described) from similar clasts of the Campanian Wietersdorf Gosau-sediments in Carinthia. Many thanks! Franz Bernhard
  7. First of all: The book about the Coniacian-Santonian corals of Rußbach-Gosau, Austria, by Löser et al. (2019) is printed. It can be ordered at: http://www.korallen-kreide.de/index.html Its a must-have for all people interested in fossil corals! And: The abridged English version is also ready for download there! And now to my first application of this important milestone work: During my searching and digging at point 36 west of Kalchberg, St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria, at 07/04/2019, I found also a piece of limestone with small, regular voids/holes/tubes. After cleaning at home, some axial ripping was visible in a few of the tubes. Good sign!! Could be another phaceloid coral colony! After cutting it was clear: It is!! And it is in some parts rather well preserved, the best specimen of this type so far. According to the work above, it seems to belong to the genus Procladocora. Four species of this genus are described for Rußbach-Gosau: P. gracilis, P. aff. exiguis, P. formosa, P. sp. In some corallites, septal insertion of 6 / 6 / 12 can be observed. The maximum outer diameter of the corallites is about 3 mm. This would place this specimen within the species P. gracilis. But the age is different and the occurrences are geographically about 200 km apart. So it is better to stick to Procladocora sp. Thanks for looking! Franz Bernhard
  8. Campanian Stromatoporoid

    Together with these two coral colonies http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/96001-corals-10-11-from-the-campanian-st-bartholomä-formation-styria-austria-gosau-group-eastern-alps/ I "discovered" also this specimen during my last visit at point 25, east of Kalchberg, in St. Bartholomä. "Discovered"? - I have found this specimen about a year ago, but did not take it with me - "It´s just a mineral". As I have not found much during my last visit, so I took it with me this time... After cleaning, I saw a somewhat faint wavy lamination - "Ah, some kind of calcite deposit"... Inspection with a hand lens revealed a tiny mesh or sieve structure in some parts - "Oh, that´s interesting"... Now I asked my local fossil expert. After some pondering he said: "This looks like a stromatopora from the nearby Devonian Plabutsch-Formation!" A quick look at his voluminous library revealed, that there indeed exist Cretaceous stromatoporoids, with nice names like Actinostromaria (compare with Paleozoic Actinostroma). I don´t think, this is an Actinostromaria, but we are rather sure, that it is a Cretaceous stromatoporoid. What do you think? Thank you very much for your opinion! PS, I found also this interesting diagram, from Wood & Reitner (1988). See also: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/94175-fossil-ball-campanian-st-bartholomä-formation-gosau-group-eastern-alps/ Franz Bernhard
  9. My hunting at point 25 east of Kalchberg at 05/16/2019 did not yield any good rudist. However, two coral colonies were found. Now I have a total of about 20 from this formation. This one is very small, poorly preserved and has a very, very low contrast (already strongly enhanced). It has some similarities to that one, but only remotely: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/87677-coral-3-from-the-campanian-st-bartholomä-formation-styria-austria-gosau-group-eastern-alps/ Corallites seems to have a diameter of about 1.2 mm. I do not expect any definitive answer , just showing it off . Thanks for your interest! Franz Bernhard
  10. The next two corals from St. Bartholomä... I collected this specimen nearly a year ago. Thought, it has some kind of borings. But I was a little bit confused, because most of the "borings" or tubes have a regular and tight, axial ornamentation. Polished cross sections revealed not much, but a few corallites (A, B, C). One of the tubes at the margin of the specimen shows some "shell" material with ornamentation on both sides (D). The left side is in contact with younger sediment, the right side with fossiliferous limestone. On the surface of the specimen, no shell material was observed within the tubes. Just a few days ago, I recognized a corallite cross section on the surface of the specimen with some fuzzy septa (X). In conclusion, I think, this could be the outer cast of a phaceloid-dendroid coral colony with nearly no "shell" material preserved - just a cast. In the Gosau-group, genera like Procladocora, Cladocora, Calamophylliopsis look somewhat similar. Thanks for your interest and opinion! Franz Bernhard
  11. I am not sure, where to post this, please feel free to move it to the appropriate topic. I made the schematic drawing of mollusc habitats already more then 2 years ago, now I have pepped it up with shell pics of the most abundant species. All shells are self collected and in my collection, but no scale, no names... The largest pics are the most abundant molluscs in this area, there are only about 5 of them, that are really super-abundant. There is a lot of hidden info in this pic, but is it discernible without any further explanation? Maybe you have at least some fun ! Franz Bernhard
  12. Hello! Another colonial coral from St. Bartholomä. Contrast is poor and that´s the best I can to with my scrappy scrap. I think, I have not found such a coral before in this formation. And its the second largest colony I have found so far there. My guess is, that it could be Astraeofungia (g, h) or Dimorphastrea (a, b), all pics from Löser et al. (2015). But I am very probably wrong... Thank you very much for your help! Franz Bernhard
  13. taphonomy & methodology

    Disentangling the history of complex multi-phased shell beds based on the analysis of 3D point cloud data Mathias Harzhauser, Ana Djuricic,Oleg Mandic,Martin Zuschin,Peter Dorninger,Clemens Nothegger,Balázs Székelyb,Eetu Puttonen,Gábor Molnárb,Norbert Pfeifer Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology Volume 437, 1 November 2015, Pages 165-180 1-s2.0-S0031018215004149-main.pdf taxa concerned: Paroxystele amedei (Brongniart, 1823) r Superfamily: Neritoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Agapilia pachii c Nerita plutonis (Basterot, 1825) f Superfamily: Cerithoidea Férussac, 1821–1822 Ptychopotamides papaveraceus (Basterot, 1825) f Granulolabium bicinctum (Brocchi, 1814) r Turritella gradata (Hörnes, 1856) r Oligodia bicarinata (Eichwald, 1830) r Petaloconchus intortus (Lamarck, 1822) c Superfamily: Calyptraeoidea Lamarck, 1822 Calyptraea depressa (Lamarck, 1822) f Calyptraea irregularis (Cossmann & Peyrot, 1919) f Superfamily: Velutinoidea Gray, 1840 Erato sp. r Superfamily: Naticoidea Guilding, 1834 Polinices pseudoredemptus (Friedberg, 1923) f Neverita josephinia (Risso, 1826) r Superfamily: Muricoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Ocenebra crassilabiata (Hilber, 1879) c Ocinebrina striata (Eichwald, 1853) c Janssenia echinulata (Pusch, 1837) r Nassarius edlaueri (Beer-Bistricky, 1958) f Cyllenina suessi (Hoernes and Auinger, 1882) c Tudicla rusticula (Basterot, 1825) c Superfamily: Cancellariidae Forbes and Hanley, 1851 Solatia exwestiana (Sacco, 1894) r Superfamily: Conoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Perrona semimarginata (Lamarck, 1822) r Perrona louisae (Hoernes and Auinger, 1891) r Perrona vindobonensis (Hörnes, 1854) r Class: Cephalopoda Cuvier, 1795 Aturia aturi (Basterot, 1825) r Class: Bivalvia Linnaeus, 1758 Superfamily: Gastrochaenoidea Gray, 1840 Rocellaria dubia (Pennant, 1777) r ok,am quitting the italics for once Superfamily: Arcoidea Lamarck, 1809 Anadara diluvii (de Lamarck, 1805) r Superfamily: Limopsoidea Dall, 1895 Glycymeris deshayesi (Mayer, 1868) r Superfamily: Mytiloidea Rafinesqe, 1815 Perna aquitanica (Mayer, 1858) f Septifer oblitus (Michelotti, 1847) r Superfamily: Pteriidae Gray, 1847 Isognomon soldanii (Deshayes, 1836) r Superfamily: Pectinoidea Rafinesqe, 1815 Pecten styriacus (Hilber, 1879) r Aequipecten macrotis (Sowerby in Smith, 1847) r Superfamily: Anomioidea Rafinesque, 1815 Anomia ephippium Linnaeus, 1758 r Superfamily: Ostreoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Crassostrea gryphoides (Schlotheim, 1813) f Ostrea digitalina (Dubois de Montpereux, 1831) f Superfamily: Lucinoidea Fleming, 1828 Loripes dujardini (Deshayes, 1850) r Megaxinus incrassatus (Dubois de Montpereux, 1831) r Diplodonta rotundata (Montagu, 1803) r Superfamily: Chamoidea Lamarck, 1822 Pseudochama gryphina (Lamarck, 1819) r Superfamily: Cardioidea Lamarck, 1809 Cardium hians (Brocchi, 1814) Acanthocardia paucicostata (Sowerby, 1839) f Superfamily: Mactroidea Lamarck, 1809 Ervilia pusilla (Philippi, 1836) r Superfamily: Solenoidea Lamarck, 1809 Solen marginatus (Pulteney, 1799) c Superfamily: Tellinoidea de Blainville, 1814 Tellina planata (Linnaeus, 1758) r Superfamily: Veneroidea Rafinesque, 1815 Cordiopsis islandicoides (Lamarck, 1818) r Venerupis basteroti (Mayer, 1857) f related editorial note: GEOSPHERE is a free access publication;the link is quite long,and i noticed i got the message : session timed out so: a slightly more indirect way of pointing the way: https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geosphere/article/12/5/1457/189679/high-resolution-3d-surface-modeling-of-a-fossil High-resolution 3D surface modeling of a fossil oyster reef Ana Djuricic Peter Dorninger Clemens Nothegger Mathias Harzhauser Balázs Székely Sascha Rasztovits Oleg Mandic Gábor Molnár Norbert Pfeifer Geosphere (2016) 12 (5): 1457-1477. WARNING: 45 MB
  14. Fossil fish

    Sometimes, in our lives, we can be in love with someone or something, that's the case with me now. I made a gift to myself and I'm in love with it. I just want to ask, if the specimen below might be close to one of the Green River fishes. It cames from Austria, but the seller can't remember where it is from. It was bought 20 years ago and kept in good conditions, as reflect the original pictures of the seller. Any idea / confirmation / comment on the margin, will be highly appreciated. Thank you.
  15. This time a really odd ball from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (West of Kalchberg, point 36). Collected 04/09/2019. Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation, Gosau group, Eastern Alps. The specimen was very dirty, thought it is just a round and smooth limestone piece, but haven´t found such a smooth piece there before, so I took it with me. After cleaning (but without any prep) and inspecting with a hand lens, I discovered, that the subglobular specimen of about 7 cm in size is covered over and over with tiny polygons, about 0.1-0.2 mm in size. So it is a fossil! But what? It seems to have two natural openings, a larger on (pic A) and a smaller one (pic B), with polygons all over the rims and also inside the rim of the opening (pic F). At the lower right corner of pic F you can see, that the polygons are in reality prismatic structures. Polygons are also covering large parts of the inside of the two openings. The prismatic structures can also be seen in some dimples caused by pressure solution. Any hints and suggestions are welcome! Many thanks! Franz Bernhard
  16. Fossil hunting in the Santonian - lower Campanian Geistthal-formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach, Eastern Alps (Styria, Austria) As a whole, the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä is not very fossiliferous. In contrast to the St. Bartholomä-formation with its rudists etc., the other, much more extensive formations, especially the very extensive, somewhat tubititic Afling-formation, are generally very poor in fossils. Some are known, eg. ammonites, but their occurrences are rather elusive. One exception - or at least in part - are Trochactaeon snails. They are known since the beginning of geological documentation of the area (around 1850), but only as loose pieces. It took until about the 1960ies for the first finds of this snails in outcrops. However, only a few sentences were (repeatedly) published since then, only a list of the species is given (without any description), and also no detailed description of the occurrences and their exact locations. That´s the sad side. The good side is: There is at least one (permanent) occurrence of this snails in an outcrop at a major road! This occurrence is at the red X... Part of Geofast-map (left, squares are 2x2 km) and geological overview from Ebner (2000) (right). There seems to be not much correspondence between these maps. For orientation, see village Geistthal in upper part of both maps. ...and it is featured in an excursion guide from 2015 (from Hubmann & Gross, 2015): The snails are located in the upper part of the Geistthal-formation, a succession of gray conglomerates, sandstones and siltstones with very occasional thin coal layers and thin beds of calcareous onkoids. The lower part of the Geistthal-formation is a coarse-grained, red conglomerate; its the basal formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach. I have visited this outcrop in December 2015, and yes, the snails are still there.
  17. Chonetid impressions in slate (“Chonetenschiefer”) from the Plabutsch-formation, Palaeozoic of Graz, Styria, Austria (Devonian – Eifelian) The classic occurrence at Gaisbergsattel, west of Graz The Eifelian Plabutsch-formation – mostly fossiliferous limestones – of the Palaeozoic of Graz, Styria, Austria, contains locally beds of slates of various colors. Some of these beds contain abundant limonitic imprints of brachiopods and bivalves (“Chonetenschiefer”). The locality first mentioned in the literature (1871) is that at Gaisbergsattel west of Graz: Austrian map with "classic" occurrence of “Chonetenschiefer” at Gaisbergsattel (red x). Part of geological map of Kuntschnig (1937) with “Chonetenschiefer” between the two red x east of Gaisbergsattel. Here, the slate layer is up to 2 m thick, grey like mice and splits easily in flat pieces (Hanselmayer, 1957). The fauna was first listed in Heritsch (1935): Chonetes subquadrata Chonetes sarcinulata Chonetes oblonga Chonetes nova species (most abundant!) Spirifer aculeatus Pterinea fasciculata Pterinea cf. bifida Pterinea cf. costata More than 10 years ago, my first attempt looking for these rocks was not successful. A few days ago (03/29/2019), however, I stumbled over this rock by pure serendipity. A small piece of it was lying on a rather busy hiking trail (“Mariazeller Weg 06”) east of Gaisbergsattel. Relief map with my first find of “Chonetenschiefer” at the hiking trail (red x) and supposed outcrop area of this rock after the geologic map of Kuntschnig (1937). Hiking trail “Mariazeller Weg 06”, where I found my first specimen. Pic from 04/01/2019. I was able to split the rock with my fingernail – and there they were, the limonitic brachiopod imprints! A faint radial ripping is visible. No other specimen was found on the trail. Now I looked closely at the geologic map, the text of Hanselmayer (1957), and the relief map and decided to explore the area around the red line (see above), where the outcrop of this rock is supposed to be. It’s a forested area with dense undergrowth, among the undergrowth many spiky blackberry bushes… No outcrop was found, but fallen trees have exposed some rock fragments: Abundant limestones, light brownish slates and, yes, some grey slate, mostly small pieces. I split only the largest of them – and again some brachiopod imprints were found...
  18. AN4161_AN4162

    From the album Hippurites colliciatus Woodward, 1855 from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria

    West of Kalchberg, point 36, collected 03/17/2019.
  19. AN4163_AN4164

    From the album Hippurites colliciatus Woodward, 1855 (Pseudocolonies) from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria

    West of Kalchberg, point 36, collected 03/17/2019.
  20. Hello, here is the next coral colony from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation in Styria, Austria (Gosau-group), collected 02/10/2019, west of Kalchberg, point 36. This coral colony is intergrown with limestone. There is a naturally weathered cross section and naturally weathered vertical section (but not much to see there). I have cut and polished one end and preservation seems to be not too bad. However, as usual, am rather clueless. I think, it has external pali, so it could belong to Hydnophoropsis? Many thanks for your help! Franz Bernhard
  21. AN4155_AN4156

    From the album Hippurites nabresinensis Futterer, 1893 from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria

    East of Kalchberg, point 25, collected 02/27/2019. Crushed specimen with various sediment infill and quite nice contrast.
  22. AN3869_AN3870_AN3915_AN3916_AN3917

    From the album Vaccinites vesiculosus (Woodward, 1855) from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria

    East of Kalchberg, point 30, collected 08/23/2017. Long, but incomplete specimen with various sediment infill. L-pillar is broken off and displaced in most sections.
  23. AN4150_AN4151_AN4152

    From the album Vaccinites vesiculosus (Woodward, 1855) from St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria

    West of Kalchberg, point 36, collected 02/10/2019. Serial section of the upper part of a relatively large V. vesiculosus. AN4152 is about 15 mm from commisure; parts of the left (upper) valve are preserved.
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