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Found 23 results

  1. My dear friends, I'd like to show up a little. As everyone know i am baltic amber inclusions maniac, lover and re-searcher. At my begining i had dream about fining a holotype or seomething extremely rare. With time and determination, we all can do big things, even if its very hard and even we are exhausted. As in every market, here in Poland is very hard to find honest sellers of raw ambers who did not check material for inclusions. To be honest - i must keep fingers crossed if they miss something and i will find it. All the best things are gone at start ( amber fishers and diggers ). But to the point - sometimes i am lucky and i;d like to show link to article about moths that i found in copulating / mating position. Its is extremely rare becouse never in Baltic amber examinations history we didn't notice scene like that. This is funny story. I know PD doctor Thilo Fisher from Germany and several times i was send moths to him. In one of our friendly conversation he said something like this in joke: if you ar so good - find me copulating moths becouse it is impossible. Now i know that everything is possible if determination is huge, passion is huge and if you never give up. Here is the article - https://palaeo-electronica.org/content/2019/2421-mating-moths I attached also picture but is not good - old equipment. Enjoy, Artur PS - to every young collectors - never give up, dreams can come true.
  2. A question of ant anatomy

    I've recently been engaging in my pointless and worthless hobby of photographing inclusions in amber. Baltic amber on this occasion, and my favourite type of inclusions, ants. However, I have a question about the structures that I see on the ant's heads, and I wonder if anybody could fill me in? I've done some googling with limited results. My question pertains to the ocelli, organs on the heads of ants which in some way assist them with navigation. First of all, in this picture, you can see a structure between the two antennae, which looks quite similar to a human skin tag. Is this an ocelus? My understanding was that these organs came in threes. Perhaps it is three, very close together, and the image lacks the definition to see it? Closeup: Secondly, there's this specimen: On this one, I can see three raised, domed lumps on the back of the head which I guess may be ocelli (highlighted in this closeup), but if they are, then what are the other structures visible? At first glance they could be mistaken for hairs, though I don't think they are - the one on the left of the highlighted area, which has become detached, appears quite distinctive. Closeup: As you can probably tell, I am a total beginner when it comes to ant anatomy (antanatomy, to give it its proper scientific name), so any pointers would be most welcome.
  3. Hello all. I went to a show recently and purchased this piece of amber with an apparent spider inclusion for $78. I don't have all the materials to do testing, but the piece has no taste. Could anyone help me determine if this is legit by looking?
  4. insect in Baltic amber

    Hello everyone! Thanks to the generous @caldigger I have received my very first fossil insect, and I was wondering if anyone can help me identify it further - it's in Baltic amber from Palanga, Lithuania, and it's from the Eocene. Here are some pictures: Thanks so much! Monica
  5. Help with Identification

    Dear Fossil Forum I'm just getting started and trying to get up to speed with my own specimens. I have two poor quality pictures of insects, looking for some help with identification. One is a bi map file of a white spider and one is of a small fly. These specimens are in Baltic amber from Latvia. Please help, any comments would be appreciated! Jimmy
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Baltic Amber, Fossil, Formicidae, Ant Probably Kalingrad area, Russian Federation Eocene epoch, circa 44 million years ago The Baltic region is home to the largest known deposit of amber, called Baltic amber or succinite. It dates from 44 million years ago (during the Eocene epoch). It has been estimated that these forests created more than 100,000 tons of amber. Today, more than 90% of the world's amber comes from Kaliningrad Oblast of Russia. It is a major source of income for the region; the local Kaliningrad Amber Combine extracted 250 tonnes of it in 2014,[3] 400 tonnes in 2015. "Baltic amber" formerly thought to include amber from the Bitterfeld brown coal mines in Saxony (Eastern Germany). Bitterfeld amber was previously believed to be only 20–22 million years old (Miocene), but a comparison of the animal inclusions in 2003 suggested that it was possibly Baltic amber that was redeposited in a Miocene deposit. Further study of insect taxa in the ambers has shown Bitterfeld amber to be from the same forest as the Baltic amber forest, but separately deposited from a more southerly section, in a similar manner as Rovno amber. Other sources of Baltic amber have been listed as coming from Poland and Russia. Because Baltic amber contains about 8% succinic acid, it is also termed succinite. Ants are eusocial insects of the family Formicidae and, along with the related wasps and bees, belong to the order Hymenoptera. Ants evolved from wasp-like ancestors in the Cretaceous period, about 99 million years ago, and diversified after the rise of flowering plants. More than 12,500 of an estimated total of 22,000 species have been classified. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta Order: Hymenoptera Family: Formicidae
  7. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Baltic Amber, Fossil, Formicidae, Ant Probably Kalingrad area, Russian Federation Eocene epoch, circa 44 million years ago The Baltic region is home to the largest known deposit of amber, called Baltic amber or succinite. It dates from 44 million years ago (during the Eocene epoch). It has been estimated that these forests created more than 100,000 tons of amber. Today, more than 90% of the world's amber comes from Kaliningrad Oblast of Russia. It is a major source of income for the region; the local Kaliningrad Amber Combine extracted 250 tonnes of it in 2014,[3] 400 tonnes in 2015. "Baltic amber" formerly thought to include amber from the Bitterfeld brown coal mines in Saxony (Eastern Germany). Bitterfeld amber was previously believed to be only 20–22 million years old (Miocene), but a comparison of the animal inclusions in 2003 suggested that it was possibly Baltic amber that was redeposited in a Miocene deposit. Further study of insect taxa in the ambers has shown Bitterfeld amber to be from the same forest as the Baltic amber forest, but separately deposited from a more southerly section, in a similar manner as Rovno amber. Other sources of Baltic amber have been listed as coming from Poland and Russia. Because Baltic amber contains about 8% succinic acid, it is also termed succinite. Ants are eusocial insects of the family Formicidae and, along with the related wasps and bees, belong to the order Hymenoptera. Ants evolved from wasp-like ancestors in the Cretaceous period, about 99 million years ago, and diversified after the rise of flowering plants. More than 12,500 of an estimated total of 22,000 species have been classified. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta Order: Hymenoptera Family: Formicidae
  8. baltic amber

    This insect is 3.5 mm long. I am posting several views of the same specimen I can find the right way to get a picture of it.
  9. Hello Friends, Long time i didnt post here but i think someone must representing Baltic amber Inclusions on so amazing forum. This time i attach picture of tiny parasitic wasp 1mm body from Baltic amber ( 40-54 million years - Eocene Era ) Hymenoptera: Platygastridae. Spider Eggs Parasitoid ! Cheers to all members ! Artur
  10. Baltic Amber insects

    This is my first post here. I'm a writer and photographer. Because of circumstances I have been forced this winter to photograph mostly at home, so I started doing some macro photography. Then I found interesting leftovers from the spiders in the basement, and long story short; I started taking pictures of insect inclusions in Baltic Amber. The difficulty of the subject matter intrigued me greatly. I have started to read "History of Insects" by A. Rasnitsyn, D. Quicke (Kluwer, 2002), to understand amber and inclusion process, and "Insects of Britain and Western Europe" by M. Chinery (A and C Black, 2007). I'm trying to be able to identify species and families. I have learned that one of my fossils is a Diptera Nematocera, which means two-winged midge, and thats good enough for my project. Because I plan to get a wider collection, and maybe an exhibition of some sort. So I'm asking for some help with this, and if it's ok to post regularly when in doubt. If someone here could not only tell species and family, but also what the identifying markers are. I'm a fast learner, and will not bother you if I have nothing to show, or can figure it out myself. I try to study, but need som assistance to get started. Fossile insects are not as easy as spotting a bee or wasp or fly. So here are my first images. I have tried to name one or two, but like I said, I no next to nothing of my subject matter. (I have education in anatomy, and a rudimentary understanding of insect parts, but need pointers to put the puzzle together). The size of the inclusions are 2-4mm in body length. All are probably from the Eocene period. Thanks! I am puzzeled by the head of this one. I just call it a Diptera for now. Someone on a forum told me this was a Chironomidae, but why? The bug on the bottom looks like a Weevil. I think this is a Midge hunting an ant. If it is a Nematocera. But it looks like it has hair on the body. Is this a wasp or a fly? I have no idea. A fellow photographer called her a "Ikea bug" Some assembly required:) The seller of this one called her a Diptera Nematocera, or a mosquito of some sort.
  11. bee serious

    Some of you might have Baltic amber pieces with insects. http://apiculture-populaire.com/pdf/Evolution-of-the-Apoidea.pdf
  12. Hello Friends. I just want to share amazing inclusion from Baltic amber. Pictures are not photoshopped - i use illuminator with strong halogen lights + microscope + photocamera + focus stacking freeware Enjoy ahh - i am sorry for showing off..
  13. Dear Friends, I found really nice specimen - Mammalian Hairs inside Baltic Amber. It was very lucky find becouse inside amber with Lepidoptera ( Moth ) i focused only on very nice Lepidoptera. When i start polish second side - i found this amazing hairs. I cut and prepared it separately. Doctors from Polish Uniwersity In Gdansk already saw it - Soon they will be put on exposition in Baltic Amber Museum in Gdansk and i am very proud :) :) Good resolution pictures -------> https://picasaweb.google.com/104612747881478275852/MammalianHairs#slideshow/6155057738284068226 With best regards Artur Michalski / Baltic Amber Inclusion
  14. IS Mammalian Hair 1b

    From the album Mammalian Hairs Inside Baltic Amber

    © Artur Michalski©

  15. IS 915 kadr

    From the album Spider Exuviae Inside Baltic Amber

    Example of perfect spider Exuviae inside Baltic amber. Eocene Era.
  16. Hello everyone. My boyfriend and I have began to collect amber fossils about two months ago. Mainly we get amber from Myanmar, for the beautiful yellow color of the resin. My boyfriend was able to find a legitimate direct source to acquire freshly mined Baltic amber, we couldn't be more blessed! The Baltic amber is quite stunning in nature and holds fascinating history. Here I like to show everyone some pieces from our collection we are the most proud of. We do not know what's encased within, hopefully in time we'll learn enough to identify. For now, we enjoy the beauty of the unknown (and some known =D ) ---- For some strange reason the website freeze and crash when I upload certain photos. Is there a reason that could have caused this crash? I noticed the site always crashed for the same ones I tried to upload. So unfortunately I can't display what I want to for now... That's why there are only three. Too bad, I really want to show off the scorpion ones... hahaha.
  17. Just one piece I bought yesterday, I thought i'd show you guys because the detail is really amazing. This is a Caddis Fly in Baltic amber, (Trichoptera Polycentropodidae) and you can even see the facets of the eyes and every minute detail on the body. pictures by amberica west. this pic shows the head and eye detail particularly well. ----> I can't wait for this to arrive!
  18. Hello friends ! I got nice amber piece with many insects inside. There we got a spider, many flies, amazing Trichoptera with colour eyes and super Fly laying eggs (!). Nice action scene trapped more than 40 million years ago trapped more than 40 million years ago ...
  19. Baltic Amber Inclusion I.d

    i recently purchased this small piece off ebay for $8.00 US dollars, it has one small insect in it (as far as i can tell from the pics) and was sold from Germany. i don't know what it is but i have pictures included and it seems to have some sort of wing. any help would be greatly appreciated.
  20. Hello. I got amazing spider in Baltic Amber and i am really happy for this ! ARCHAEA PARADOXA in beautiful position.
  21. Hey Finally I have managed to find ways to take a zoomed up pics of my baltic amber to get a better view of the inclusions inside (trying to angle an iPhone camera on a loupe to get a good pic wasn't an easy task...), though I really have no idea of what they are. Anyway here are the pics of the amber inclusions: Specimen A: Specimen B: Specimen C: Specimen D - This one is a tubular amber with a few different kind of inclusions inside: Specimen E - Another specimen with multiple inclusions: Last time the pics I posted in my old thread weren't any good to help ID the specimens inside, hopefully this time these pics will do better. Thx a lot guys
  22. Amber With A Natural Hole ?

    I found the piece between amber. I checked the floats in salt (but also) and fresh water. It has two oval depressions one of the one and one and half of the "third of a second. Told me that it could be natural hole. However, the holes are not through. Help someone?
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