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Found 31 results

  1. Archimedes Bryzoan E

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    A two-sided fossil! Note the other fossil life... Archimedes Bryzoan in Matrix Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans with a calcified skeleton of a delicate spiral-shaped mesh that was thickened near the axis into a massive corkscrew-shaped central structure. The most common remains are fragments of the mesh that are detached from the central structure, and these may not be identified other than by association with the "corkscrews", that are fairly common. Specimens in which the mesh remains attached to the central structure are rare. Like other bryozoans, Archimedes forms colonies, and like other fenestrates, the individuals (or zooids) lived on one side of the mesh, and can be recognized for the two rows of equally distanced rimmed pores. Inside the branches, neighbouring individuals were in contact through small canals. Bryozoans are stationary epifaunal suspension feeders. The majority of fossils of this genus are distributed throughout Europe and North America, but they have also been found in sediments of Afghanistan, Canada, Russia, and Australia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Bryozoa Class: Stenolaemata Order: †Fenestrida Family: †Fenestellidae Genus: †Archimedes
  2. Archimedes Bryzoan E

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    A two-sided fossil! Note the other fossil life... Archimedes Bryzoan in Matrix Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans with a calcified skeleton of a delicate spiral-shaped mesh that was thickened near the axis into a massive corkscrew-shaped central structure. The most common remains are fragments of the mesh that are detached from the central structure, and these may not be identified other than by association with the "corkscrews", that are fairly common. Specimens in which the mesh remains attached to the central structure are rare. Like other bryozoans, Archimedes forms colonies, and like other fenestrates, the individuals (or zooids) lived on one side of the mesh, and can be recognized for the two rows of equally distanced rimmed pores. Inside the branches, neighbouring individuals were in contact through small canals. Bryozoans are stationary epifaunal suspension feeders. The majority of fossils of this genus are distributed throughout Europe and North America, but they have also been found in sediments of Afghanistan, Canada, Russia, and Australia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Bryozoa Class: Stenolaemata Order: †Fenestrida Family: †Fenestellidae Genus: †Archimedes
  3. Crinoids - Fifeocrinus Arms a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fifeocrinus Crinoid Arms SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Crinoidea Order: †Cladida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Fifeocrinus
  4. Crinoids - Fifeocrinus Arms a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fifeocrinus Crinoid Arms SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Crinoidea Order: †Cladida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Fifeocrinus
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes bryzoan in matrix, crinoid spine on reverse Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans with a calcified skeleton of a delicate spiral-shaped mesh that was thickened near the axis into a massive corkscrew-shaped central structure. The most common remains are fragments of the mesh that are detached from the central structure, and these may not be identified other than by association with the "corkscrews", that are fairly common. Specimens in which the mesh remains attached to the central structure are rare. Like other bryozoans, Archimedes forms colonies, and like other fenestrates, the individuals (or zooids) lived on one side of the mesh, and can be recognized for the two rows of equally distanced rimmed pores. Inside the branches, neighbouring individuals were in contact through small canals. Bryozoans are stationary epifaunal suspension feeders. The majority of fossils of this genus are distributed throughout Europe and North America, but they have also been found in sediments of Afghanistan, Canada, Russia, and Australia. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. The taxa is split: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Bryozoa/Echinodermata Class: Stenolaemata/Cridoidea Order: †Fenestrida Family: †Fenestellidae Genus: †Archimedes
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes bryzoan in matrix, crinoid spine on reverse Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans with a calcified skeleton of a delicate spiral-shaped mesh that was thickened near the axis into a massive corkscrew-shaped central structure. The most common remains are fragments of the mesh that are detached from the central structure, and these may not be identified other than by association with the "corkscrews", that are fairly common. Specimens in which the mesh remains attached to the central structure are rare. Like other bryozoans, Archimedes forms colonies, and like other fenestrates, the individuals (or zooids) lived on one side of the mesh, and can be recognized for the two rows of equally distanced rimmed pores. Inside the branches, neighbouring individuals were in contact through small canals. Bryozoans are stationary epifaunal suspension feeders. The majority of fossils of this genus are distributed throughout Europe and North America, but they have also been found in sediments of Afghanistan, Canada, Russia, and Australia. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. The taxa is split: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Bryozoa/Echinodermata Class: Stenolaemata/Cridoidea Order: †Fenestrida Family: †Fenestellidae Genus: †Archimedes
  7. Brachiopod - Schellwienella-sp a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Schellwienella sp. Brachiopod Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Strophomenata is an extinct class of brachiopods in the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" (shells) on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Brachiopod valves are hinged at the rear end, while the front can be opened for feeding or closed for protection. Two major groups are recognized, articulate and inarticulate. The word "articulate" is used to describe the tooth-and-groove features of the valve-hinge which is present in the articulate group, and absent from the inarticulate group. This is the leading diagnostic feature (fossilizable), by which the two main groups can be readily distinguished. Articulate brachiopods have toothed hinges and simple opening and closing muscles, while inarticulate brachiopods have untoothed hinges and a more complex system of muscles used to keep the two halves aligned. In a typical brachiopod a stalk-like pedicle projects from an opening in one of the valves near the hinges, known as the pedicle valve, keeping the animal anchored to the seabed but clear of silt that would obstruct the opening. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: †Strophomenata Order: †Orthotetida Family: †Pulsiidae Genus: †Schellwienella
  8. Brachiopod - Schellwienella-sp a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Schellwienella sp. Brachiopod Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Strophomenata is an extinct class of brachiopods in the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" (shells) on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Brachiopod valves are hinged at the rear end, while the front can be opened for feeding or closed for protection. Two major groups are recognized, articulate and inarticulate. The word "articulate" is used to describe the tooth-and-groove features of the valve-hinge which is present in the articulate group, and absent from the inarticulate group. This is the leading diagnostic feature (fossilizable), by which the two main groups can be readily distinguished. Articulate brachiopods have toothed hinges and simple opening and closing muscles, while inarticulate brachiopods have untoothed hinges and a more complex system of muscles used to keep the two halves aligned. In a typical brachiopod a stalk-like pedicle projects from an opening in one of the valves near the hinges, known as the pedicle valve, keeping the animal anchored to the seabed but clear of silt that would obstruct the opening. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: †Strophomenata Order: †Orthotetida Family: †Pulsiidae Genus: †Schellwienella
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Deltodus primus Shark Tooth in matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) The Cochliodontiformes are an extinct group of cartilaginous fish, which is mainly known through fossil and tooth plate finds and occurred from the Upper Carboniferous to the Upper Permian. Externally, the fish looked like skinned, flattened transitional forms between primitive sharks and today's sea cats (Chimaeriformes). Upper and lower jaws were each occupied in each half with a long, spirally curved tooth plate. In front of it were possibly even smaller teeth. The tooth plates were very similar to those of Jurassic sea cats. Transverse lines on the dental plates suggest that they originated from the merging of several individual teeth. The Cochliodontiformes are close relatives of the sea cats are considered their sister group. Similar to the sea cats the upper jaw (the Palatoquadratum) is completely merged with the Neurocranium ("brain skull"), a state of the Holostylie is called ("holocephal" = skull from a piece). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: †Cochliodontiformes Family: †Cochliodontidae Genus: †Deltodus Species: †primus
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Deltodus primus Shark Tooth in matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) The Cochliodontiformes are an extinct group of cartilaginous fish, which is mainly known through fossil and tooth plate finds and occurred from the Upper Carboniferous to the Upper Permian. Externally, the fish looked like skinned, flattened transitional forms between primitive sharks and today's sea cats (Chimaeriformes). Upper and lower jaws were each occupied in each half with a long, spirally curved tooth plate. In front of it were possibly even smaller teeth. The tooth plates were very similar to those of Jurassic sea cats. Transverse lines on the dental plates suggest that they originated from the merging of several individual teeth. The Cochliodontiformes are close relatives of the sea cats are considered their sister group. Similar to the sea cats the upper jaw (the Palatoquadratum) is completely merged with the Neurocranium ("brain skull"), a state of the Holostylie is called ("holocephal" = skull from a piece). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: †Cochliodontiformes Family: †Cochliodontidae Genus: †Deltodus Species: †primus
  11. Mollusca Shizodus depressus a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shizodus depressus bi-valve SITE LOCATION: Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Trigoniida is order of medium-sized saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Within the fossil record the occurrence of this order is widespread, ranging from the Devonian Period to Recent. The diagnostic feature for the order is the unique and complex dentition of the shell, (i.e. the interior hinge teeth that articulate the two valves). The dentition is particularly elaborate within the family Trigoniidae. Bieler, Carter, & Coan (2010) included the following families and superfamilies in Trigoniida. Taxa marked with a † are extinct with the only extant family in the order being Trigoniidae. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Trigoniida Family: †Schizodidae Genus: †Shizodus Species: †depressus
  12. Mollusca Shizodus depressus a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shizodus depressus bi-valve SITE LOCATION: Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Trigoniida is order of medium-sized saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Within the fossil record the occurrence of this order is widespread, ranging from the Devonian Period to Recent. The diagnostic feature for the order is the unique and complex dentition of the shell, (i.e. the interior hinge teeth that articulate the two valves). The dentition is particularly elaborate within the family Trigoniidae. Bieler, Carter, & Coan (2010) included the following families and superfamilies in Trigoniida. Taxa marked with a † are extinct with the only extant family in the order being Trigoniidae. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Trigoniida Family: †Schizodidae Genus: †Shizodus Species: †depressus
  13. Eumetria vera brachiopods.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eumetria vera Brachiopods SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Athyridida is an order of Paleozoic brachiopods included in the Rhynchonellata, which makes up part of the articulate brachiopods. The Athyridida are the Rostrospracea of R.C Moore, 1952,[3] considered at that time to be a suborder of the Spiriferida. As with the Spiriferida, the Athyridida have outwardly directed spiral brachidia that support the lophophores on either side, but instead have non-plicate shells with rounded outlines and prominent beaks but almost no inner areas on the pedicle valve. Athyridids began early in the Silurian, reached their greatest diversity in the following Devonian, and from then declined steadily until almost becoming extinct at the end of the Permian The order rejuvenated somewhat during the Triassic, only to decline again until becoming extinct in the Jurassic. Athyris, Composita, and Meristella are representative genera. Three suborders have been defined. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Athyridida Family: †Retziidae Genus: †Eumetria Species: †vera
  14. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anthracospirifer increbescens brachiopod in matrix SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Spiriferida is an order of extinct articulate brachiopod fossils which are known for their long hinge-line, which is often the widest part of the shell. In some genera (e.g. Mucrospirifer) it is greatly elongated, giving them a wing-like appearance. They often have a deep fold down the center of the shell. The feature that gives the spiriferids their name ("spiral-bearers") is the internal support for the lophophore; this brachidium, which is often preserved in fossils, is a thin ribbon of calcite that is typically coiled tightly within the shell. Spiriferids first appear in the Late Ordovician with the appearance of Eospirifer radiatus. They increased in diversity throughout the Silurian and underwent a dramatic evolutionary radiation during the Devonian period, reaching peak development in variety and numbers. Spiriferida survived the great Permian extinction, finally becoming extinct during the Early Jurassic. Fossils of this order are often preserved as pyrite. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Spiriferida Family: †Spiriferidae Genus: †Anthracospirifer Species: †increbescens
  15. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anthracospirifer increbescens brachiopod in matrix SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Spiriferida is an order of extinct articulate brachiopod fossils which are known for their long hinge-line, which is often the widest part of the shell. In some genera (e.g. Mucrospirifer) it is greatly elongated, giving them a wing-like appearance. They often have a deep fold down the center of the shell. The feature that gives the spiriferids their name ("spiral-bearers") is the internal support for the lophophore; this brachidium, which is often preserved in fossils, is a thin ribbon of calcite that is typically coiled tightly within the shell. Spiriferids first appear in the Late Ordovician with the appearance of Eospirifer radiatus. They increased in diversity throughout the Silurian and underwent a dramatic evolutionary radiation during the Devonian period, reaching peak development in variety and numbers. Spiriferida survived the great Permian extinction, finally becoming extinct during the Early Jurassic. Fossils of this order are often preserved as pyrite. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Spiriferida Family: †Spiriferidae Genus: †Anthracospirifer Species: †increbescens
  16. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anthracospirifer increbescens brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Spiriferida is an order of extinct articulate brachiopod fossils which are known for their long hinge-line, which is often the widest part of the shell. In some genera (e.g. Mucrospirifer) it is greatly elongated, giving them a wing-like appearance. They often have a deep fold down the center of the shell. The feature that gives the spiriferids their name ("spiral-bearers") is the internal support for the lophophore; this brachidium, which is often preserved in fossils, is a thin ribbon of calcite that is typically coiled tightly within the shell. Spiriferids first appear in the Late Ordovician with the appearance of Eospirifer radiatus. They increased in diversity throughout the Silurian and underwent a dramatic evolutionary radiation during the Devonian period, reaching peak development in variety and numbers. Spiriferida survived the great Permian extinction, finally becoming extinct during the Early Jurassic. Fossils of this order are often preserved as pyrite. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Spiriferida Family: †Spiriferidae Genus: †Anthracospirifer Species: †increbescens
  17. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anthracospirifer increbescens brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Spiriferida is an order of extinct articulate brachiopod fossils which are known for their long hinge-line, which is often the widest part of the shell. In some genera (e.g. Mucrospirifer) it is greatly elongated, giving them a wing-like appearance. They often have a deep fold down the center of the shell. The feature that gives the spiriferids their name ("spiral-bearers") is the internal support for the lophophore; this brachidium, which is often preserved in fossils, is a thin ribbon of calcite that is typically coiled tightly within the shell. Spiriferids first appear in the Late Ordovician with the appearance of Eospirifer radiatus. They increased in diversity throughout the Silurian and underwent a dramatic evolutionary radiation during the Devonian period, reaching peak development in variety and numbers. Spiriferida survived the great Permian extinction, finally becoming extinct during the Early Jurassic. Fossils of this order are often preserved as pyrite. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Spiriferida Family: †Spiriferidae Genus: †Anthracospirifer Species: †increbescens
  18. Horn Coral Group.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Horn Coral SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  19. Graveyard fossil side a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Graveyard Fossil - with Trilobite Appendage SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) A "Graveyard" style fossil; many animals here. Both sides of the specimen show bryzoan remnants, some crinoid, Mollusk and Bryzoan remnants.
  20. Graveyard fossil side a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Graveyard Fossil - with Trilobite Appendage SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) A "Graveyard" style fossil; many animals here. Both sides of the specimen show bryzoan remnants, some crinoid, Mollusk and Bryzoan remnants.
  21. Crinoids - Phanocrinus formosus a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid - Phanocrinus formosus SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms. The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea Order: †Cladida Family: †Synerocrinidae Genus: †Phanocrinus Species: †formosus
  22. Crinoids - Phanocrinus formosus a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid - Phanocrinus formosus SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms. The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea Order: †Cladida Family: †Synerocrinidae Genus: †Phanocrinus Species: †formosus
  23. Eucalyptocrinities Crinoid Calyx.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eupachycrinus Crinoid Calyx Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Crinoidea Order: †Cladida Family: †Eupachycrinidae Genus: †Eupachycrinus
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Blastoids - Two Pentremites in Matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm.[1] Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the end of Permian, about 250 million years ago. Although never as diverse as their contemporary relatives, the crinoids, blastoids are common fossils, especially in many Mississippian-age rocks. Pentremites is an extinct genus of blastoid echinoderm belonging to the family Pentremitidae. These echinoderms averaged a height of about 11 centimetres (4.3 in)but occasionally ranged up to about 3 times that size. They, like other blastoids, superficially resemble their distant relatives, the crinoids or sea lilies, having a near-idential lifestyle living on the sea floor attached by a stalk. They trapped food floating in the currents by means of tentacle-like appendages. Pentremites species lived in the early to middle Carboniferous, from 360.7 to 314.6 Ma. Its fossils are known from North America. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: †Blastoidea Order: †Spiraculata Family: †Pentremitidae Genus: †Pentremites
  25. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Blastoids - Two Pentremites in Matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm.[1] Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the end of Permian, about 250 million years ago. Although never as diverse as their contemporary relatives, the crinoids, blastoids are common fossils, especially in many Mississippian-age rocks. Pentremites is an extinct genus of blastoid echinoderm belonging to the family Pentremitidae. These echinoderms averaged a height of about 11 centimetres (4.3 in)but occasionally ranged up to about 3 times that size. They, like other blastoids, superficially resemble their distant relatives, the crinoids or sea lilies, having a near-idential lifestyle living on the sea floor attached by a stalk. They trapped food floating in the currents by means of tentacle-like appendages. Pentremites species lived in the early to middle Carboniferous, from 360.7 to 314.6 Ma. Its fossils are known from North America. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: †Blastoidea Order: †Spiraculata Family: †Pentremitidae Genus: †Pentremites
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