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Found 24 results

  1. ID Wood, Iron, bones in MD?

    New to the sport. Found these yesterday at Calvert Cliffs and along the Potomac River. Big debate was weather the largest piece was bark that had been replaced by iron of if it was just a clump of iron from the bog. Several larger pieces observed on site in the cliffs and on the beach- some said they were wood; other just "bog iron". Please critique or help with id. Thank you.
  2. Mystery Tree, Bark and Leaves!

    Hi, I found these in the Carbonado Formation Washington State. 42 - 47 million years ago. Eocene under a coal seam. I found this bark of some mysterious looking tree. Around the same rock were tons of leaves, all similar to one species (except one leaf which I will also include). I am hoping people can identify the family of tree for me. I also am posting some strange "cattail" / "horsetail" like stem / leaf because this could possibly be a branch from this tree. disclaimer: I am still trying to figure out my phone. The last photo is more clear, larger and detailed. The only difference was, I held my phone sideways. Maybe this is what I will do in the future. First I will post the bark
  3. Tree Bark from Eocene ID

    I needed help identifying this tree bark. Its about 38 million years old from the Renton Formation in Western Washington State. I can see insect burrow marks but they could also be the details in the tree itself. Its about 12 inches long and 5 ish inches wide
  4. Good evening to everyone, I am really very new to fossils and petrified items so I am at a loss as to what I may have and I need your help. My grandfather left me this piece when he passed away a few months ago and it was marked "Petrified Mushroom". I have included some photos for your review and if you have any questions please let me know. The mushroom, for lack of a better word, is about 22" long by 14" deep by about 3/8" in height. It weighs just about 74 grams and has a spot in the middle that looks like wood, it looks like it was cut or removed from a piece of wood maybe a tree. Any help anyone could provide would be extremely appreciated. If this is the wrong forum to ask about my item I deeply apologize, just let me know and I will remove the post right away. Thank you again and I hope everyone has a great week.
  5. Hi everyone. I recently visited a quarry at the north of Spain (more specifically a geographical area called "El Bierzo", famous for its fossils from the carboniferous era) and I found this one, which looks like tree bark with some particular marks. I have found several well preserved fossils at the same quarry but I will upload the pictures later. I have been looking for information about this one in particular but I haven't found out what type of tree it is, has anybody seen this before? Thank you very much!
  6. Today I figured that I would crack open a couple dozen concretions to see if there was anything of interest. Hitting them with a hammer is not the preferred practice, but I have so many that I could never freeze / thaw them in 2 lifetimes. The concretions that I opened today were collected from Pit 4, mostly flora and fresh water fauna are found at that location. Today I found the run of the mill ferns, leaves and a couple very pretty pieces of bark.
  7. Found on Cape Jack Beach Nova Scotia. I have 3 more like this. Stigmaria Root? I have one I know is an imprint.. but is this one a fossilized piece of root or an imprint? Would love any insight! Thanks in advance. I have more pictures but they are 3mb each.. Can I post more?
  8. Tree Bark? Coal Mine Exposure

    Might be a case of pareidolia but these oddly shaped rocks resemble something... First to me looks like tree bark. (is it real?) Second i have no idea what it looks like (most likely just a weird way the rock broke) [Found in Kanawha County WV, Dunkard Group]
  9. Scale Tree

    Kathleen B. Pigg of the University of Arizona notes that this "stem subsurface pattern that is sometimes called 'rabbit tracks'. The double track you see is probably a result of a pair of air channels that accompany the leaf trace through the cortex. The vertical ribs are produced by an increase of bark through secondary tissue production." The pair of sepicemns in the first image are the positive and negative impressions of the same piece. The second image is a detail from the same specimen.
  10. Bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  11. Calamities Bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a tree-like plant with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Carbondale, PA. Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  12. Calamities bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a bamboo-like plant closely related to modern horsetails with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  13. Calamite

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a tree-like plant with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Found in a tailings pile in Carbondale, PA.
  14. Scale Tree Bark

    From the album Carbondale, PA

    Syringodendron sp. (Sigillaria family) Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period
  15. Greetings from Carbondale!

    This week we found ourselves headed for Carbon County, PA and looked up some places to go hunting. St. Clair was out, but there were some references to Carbondale here and there. As the name suggests, Carbondale was a coal mining town. There are active and inactive areas all over town, much of it fossiliferous. The most popular spot seems to be the one we went to, a tailings pile next to an apartment complex off of Westside Rd. The land status is unknown, but there were was nothing posted, so we ventured in as many have done before us. Our directions said to follow the gravel path between the third and fourth buildings on the right, then bear left and continue to the en of the ravel road, where you'd see a "mountain of tailings." When we parked, I looked from side to side for a pile I expected to be maybe the size of a van. From behind me, I hear my husband say, "Oh, that mountain of tailings." I looked from side to side. No, her told me, look straight ahead and up. Oh! It was indeed a mountain! The pile loomed above the rich grove. How did I miss that? (On a return trip a couple days later, I noticed it also loomed over the apartments!) A narrow trail leads through the woods to a meadow and a bare section of wall just asking to be explored. April was the perfect time to go as all the weeds were down from the winter snows and not yet regrowing much. The trees growing from the wall itself provided just enough footing for me to climb without sliding back down - until I wanted to. Whee! Once I reached the wall, it took me only seconds to spot my first bit of Calamities bark, and then another, and then a complete, 3D stalk section! After about an hour of searching I spotted a limb sticking put of the fine slate crumbs and pulled it out. It was a chunk of Calamites stalk as big as my outstretched hand. I spent a total of about 5 hours over two days scrabbling across a sheer wall of loose shale. Ferns! Leaves! Roots! Seeds! Bark of all different textures! Some of the ferns were incredibly detailed. One had all the miniscule veins outlined in red (pyrite?), while others were just extremely fine impressions in the grey rock. As it turns out, the gravel road itself runs across an overgrown tailings pile. Here and there you can find exposed rock, including bark plates bigger than dinner dishes! After spending what felt like an hour on day 2 (It turned out to be three hours!!!) I decided it was time for lunch and slid down the hill like a little kid. There at the base of the hill, was mu find for the week: a whole section of tree(?) trunk with bark all the way around the specimen. It was lying alone in the woods on some leaves, just waiting for someone to wander off the beaten path. I debated about bringing it home. It was so big! Hubby was snoozing on a nearby rock. Rocks are not his thing and bringing home piles of them doubly so, but he is so sweet that he picked that heavy thing up before I could blink and carried it to the car himself. He's a keeper! It will take quite some time to photograph all my treasures, but I will post in the comments here when I have an album together.
  16. Small carbon film leaf scars

    This is Pennsylvanian age Mazon Creek type material found in Indiana. Not sure if even a genus can be assigned to this piece let alone a species but I thought it was worth letting you guys have a look.This appears to be outer bark with small carbon film leaf scars overlying exposed patches of inner bark. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
  17. Hello Forum, Recently, I acquired the petrified wood specimen (probably maple, Acer sp.) below at a local mineral show. It comes from the Holleywood Ranch in Linn County, Oregon. The broader area, well known for its petrified wood, is often referred to as "Sweet Home", or the Sweet Home Petrified Forest. According to Gregory (1968), the petrified wood is derived from some Miocene age subunit of the Little Butte Volcanic Series (details not entirely clear to me). I really liked the specimen because it shows a structure that I would interpret as the phloem (see this and this website). Though dependent on your definition of the term, this would mean part of the bark is preserved (quite rare, in my experience). Below the photo is an annotated micrograph of the region indicated in the overview. Does my interpretation make sense? Is this really wood (secondary xylem) plus the bark? I would also like to know why the last growth ring(s) of secondary xylem would stick to the bark? I can imagine the latter swelling up and becoming loose as the wood (waterlogged) was underwater for some time, but why not de-bond at the cambium then? Thanks for your feedback! Tim (micrograph made as follows)
  18. Found these today also. Fossil wood??
  19. Found this in my favorite spot. Too large for me to carry out on my own, and not certain if it is worthwhile to keep? Any way, any idea what it is?
  20. Well im heading down to Mazon creek in a few weeks. Forum members Digit (Ken) and Rob Russell should be meeting me down there. I think we're going to dig the Park, but it's still up in the air. Feel free to join us on our hunt, it would be nice to finally meet some members! Things to bring. -bug spray and/or tick spray -shovel, gardening claw, rock hammer or pick-axe -water, snacks, etc. -bucket/s (big or small) -backpack to help carry everything -gloves -cake it will be Ken's Birthday!!! ^^^^Feel free to add to the list^^^^ Again it's June 7 th 2014. 9 a.m. exit 236 on I55 Coal City exit @ the Shell station on Johnson rd Rte.113. Hope to see you out there! Weather update if you're interested http://m.accuweather.com/en/us/chicago-il/60608/weekend-weather/348308
  21. Mazon Creek - Braidwood - Bark

    Hi Folks- Any thoughts? I think this is most similar to Lepidodendron rimosum....Pg 107 Wittry.... Evan
  22. Interesting bark... But I have no idea what it is... Any suggestions?
  23. A Weekend Visit to A Road Cut Near Our Home Nan was busy this weekend so I drove to a road cut on Route 422 south of Pottstown, PA - about 5 miles from our house. I had been told by a friend at the Delaware Valley Paleo Society that there wouldn't be any fossils here - from the geological record, I think this is part of the Gettysburg-Newark Lowland Formation which is described online as late Triassic. The shale is red with some green and gray mixed in here and there. Telling me that there wouldn't be any fossils here was a challenge I couldn't resist. So I decided to see if I could find anything in this very barren but geologically interesting formation. What I found were fossils and impressions of a tree and twigs that resemble Siggilaria (which were extinct by the Triassic I believe), and a few other trace fossils and what I assume are some mineralizations that look like leaves but probably aren't. I wonder what kind of tree this bark pattern represents...any ideas? The roadside exposure is a very steep slope covered with golf ball sized rubble and lots of larger rock formations protruding, here and there. The roadcuts are located along Route 422 several miles south of Pottstown, Pennsylvania. I studied everything that was visible, cracking lots of rocks to see what might be hidden. Nothing, no marine fossils, not even a freshwater clam. I began to feel that this might have been a dry area, or mostly dry area. Then I came across a narrow cascade of rubble that had eroded off the steep wall and noticed some red shale pieces that looked like smooth bark of some kind. On closer inspection, I discovered several pieces (many were fragmented) that turned out to be a grooved bark pattern. In the first fossil (1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 with backview and closeup - see below) you can see: a) the bark pattern which resembles Siggilaria including one branch node (the round circle) and you can also see at the top where the bark ridges begin to branch into a diamond shaped pattern. Although this is supposed to be a Triassic formation, the tree bark has a Carboniferous look, but I'm not familiar with Triassic trees. Here are the images of the bark sample: BARK 1.1 BARK 1.2 BARK 1.1 Back View BARK 1.1 CLOSE Bark 2.1 and 3.1, and Fossil 4a(front) and 4b (back) - These are additional samples of what appear to be bark and branches/twigs: BARK 2.1 BARK 3.1 FOSSIL 4a Front FOSSIL 4b Back Twig 5 - Here is what appears to be a twig and twig impression: TWIG 5 Not sure what this is: FOSSIL 6 I assume these are mineralizations (dendrites) that look like leaf impressions but are chemical, not fossils - note the shale color is different from the red shale above (labeled Mineralization 1 and 2): MIN1 MIN2 Anyway, I guess my point is that I visited a road cut that is close to home, easy to access, and where I was told there should be no fossils. I found quite a lot to look at and ponder, and best of all, despite being parked on the roadside for 3 hours, I wondered if I would receive a visit from curious police but not at all so I felt very comfortable, except for the times when I climbed some very steep sections and found it a bit tricky to make my way back down the steep crumbly slope (I got down by choosing a section that had small samplings and used those as grips on the way down). I'm still not sure what else might be here or at other roadcuts but I have a hunch that this must be what fossil hunting in "dry" tree and plant areas might be like, since all the sources claim that not many dry forests were preserved as fossils because there wasn't much mud in the dry areas and they almost needed to be buried in a rockslide or freak flood to be preserved. Paleobotanists also suggest that the fossil record is heavily weighted toward wetland plants and trees so anything that comes from what was originally "dry" forest or meadow is worth inspecting.
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