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Found 26 results

  1. Hey there, just moved to Charlotte area from up in CT. I got bit by the fossil bug bad up there in Little Falls NY, fell in love with trilobites and the "just one more." So, having just settled in, I am looking for places to go hunting nearby. I know there's a place in the Uwharrie to find petrified wood, and the eastern rivers have shale and fossil beds, but can't quite find any open or legal locations defined enough to be able to drive to them. In the rare case I can make it to the coast, I'll be beachcombing for hours if anyone can point me to a decent shoreline. I'm interested in any sites to go fossil digging, as well as anywhere to go rockhounding within 3-4 hours of Charlotte. There are so many mines just west of Charlotte that are just the sluice and "buy a bucket", or mines that seed the area with rocks from Brazil and such, I'm looking for a native-rock mine that gives a decent chance. I don't have any machinery (unless a metal detector and UV lamp counts), but I've done my time splitting shale/limestone, and have a good eye for tiny things. I like digging holes in debris piles, rainy days that make things shine, and meeting people covered in mud, doing crazy things just to find a really cool "rock". My move to NC has been amazing so far, everyone is so much less frenzied than up north, and y'all are great! If anyone can point me in a gps direction, thanks!
  2. I'm becoming a habitual "is this wood" poster... I found this one yesterday on the shores of Lake Washington near an outcrop of the Blakeley formation, and just polished one face using sandpaper. Specimen measures 1.5 inches in the longest dimension and the polished face measures 1 inch x 1 inch. SG is 2.48 by suspension method, +/- 0.01g accuracy. The lighter spot on the polished face is where I got lazy before removing the entire weathered surface.
  3. Are there any Seattle-area folks on here who have tried hunting for beach fossils around Alki Point? You can see the outcrop pretty well on satellite images and it's on the geological maps. This Blakeley formation is pretty crumbly, though, so I'm not sure whether any meaningful fossils would survive being washed out in the surf. Guess there's only one way to find out! Since we're coming up on the new moon, the low tides are nicely timed for a long lunch break, so I'll plan to check this out some time in the next few days and report back.
  4. Petrified wood with iron vein?

    Found this on the beach the other day along Puget Sound north of Seattle, and I just polished one face a bit (first photo) with some sandpaper to see the un-weathered stone. Is this siltstone, petrified wood, something else? Has anyone seen one with iron like this? Edit: I sanded it some more and took another photo. Pretty sure this is wood, based on the grain, but I'm no expert!
  5. Beach agate, possible bivalve?

    I found this on a rocky beach in West Seattle. Looks to be pretty transparent with a bit of banding. I assume it's just geological, but based on the size and shape I guess it could maybe be a bivalve fossil? SG is 2.61
  6. My month at Myrtle Beach

    I wanted to thank everyone on this forum for making the month of January an extraordinary month in my life. We take annual trips to Myrtle Beach and I have always loved to look for the little sharks teeth in the sand. After 10 years of this, I have a nice little bottle filled with sharks teeth, none bigger than the size of a quarter. But this trip I decided to have a closer look at the ground. Without experience, I had no idea what I was looking at. So I just picked up things that looked unusual and brought them back in my room and started posting pictures on here. I had no idea of the diversity of prehistoric life that I have been stepping over this past decade. I couldn’t get enough. I started going out at night with a flashlight and learned to time the tides to see what the sea brought in. I found over 1000 sharks teeth. But I am truly much more excited about the other little bits that you helped me identify, pieces of dolphin, whale, horse, giant beaver, searobins, pufferfish and stingrays. Because I was so intent searching the ground, I even came away with an Indian spear tip and a military bullet in concretion! After 31 days, I’ve brought tubs of fossils back home. Lord knows what I’m going to do with them, but I do love to pull them out, look them over and read about the creatures they belonged to. I wanted to share with you photos of some of what I brought home.... A tiny fraction of the bone I found. Wish I knew what they belong to..... Lots of examples of the Exogyra oyster shells which for some reason absolutely fascinates me, and dozens of steinkerns I just couldn't pass up .... And a bag full of coral, seabiscuits and tube worm colonies I cant show because I reached my photo size limit I can’t wait until next January so I can do it all again. I think one of the nicest surprises was finding this special community. Thanks for letting me be part of it! — Paula
  7. Gift from the Sea

    From the album OBX

    It's amazing what washes up on the Outer Banks - modern sea shells, sea glass, bits of wrecked ships and fossils, too! These shells embedded in sandstone washed ashore on Hatteras Island, NC, from the Pleistocene sandstone shelf on which the island rests.
  8. Scallop Hash Plate

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbous hash plate Pleistocene Found washed ashore at Avon Pier, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
  9. Fossil Sand Dollar

    From the album OBX

    Echinoid (Sand dollar) Pleistocene Found washed ashore at Avon Pier, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
  10. Fossil Tube Worms, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Tube worms Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  11. Fossil Tube Worms, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Tube worms on the interior of a Mercenaria shell Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  12. Fossil Mussel Shells, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Mytilus edulis Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch
  13. Fossil Clam Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Family Venridae Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  14. Fossil Clam Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Family Venridae Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  15. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  16. Fossil Clam Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Family Venridae Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  17. Fossil Clam Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Mercenaria sp. Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  18. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  19. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  20. Pleistocene Coral, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are meric-ly challenged.
  21. Pleistocene Coral, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are meric-ly challenged.
  22. Pleistocene Coral, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are meric-ly challenged.
  23. Plesitocene Corals, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are meric-ly challenged.
  24. Is this inside of seashell fossil?

    I found this last week beachcombing on Sand Key in Clearwater Florida. Just curious...At first I thought it was just a sea rock with worn holes. But then I noticed the tapered shape and the graduated concave grooves and center hole. Thinking maybe it is the mold of the inside of a seashell? Normally I don't find fossils there but sea was rough and I did find a piece of a fossil dugong bone the same day, which I normally never find there. It measures about 1.25" by 1.25" by 1 1/8". Darker color in grooves and center hole with some charcoal and golden brown hues. Any ideas what this could be?
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