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Found 31 results

  1. Urosalpinx sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Urosalpinx sp. Gastropod SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: Urosalpinx, common name the eastern or Atlantic oyster drill, is a small predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Muricidae, the murexes or rock snails. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Family: Muricidae Genus: Urusalpinx
  2. Urosalpinx sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Urosalpinx sp. Gastropod SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: Urosalpinx, common name the eastern or Atlantic oyster drill, is a small predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Muricidae, the murexes or rock snails. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Family: Muricidae Genus: Urusalpinx
  3. Turitella alticostata a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Turitella alticostata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Turritella is a genus of medium-sized sea snails with an operculum, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Turritellidae. They have tightly coiled shells, whose overall shape is basically that of an elongated cone. The name Turritella comes from the Latin word turritus meaning "turreted" or "towered" and the diminutive suffix -ella. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Sorbeoconcha Family: Turritellidae Genus: Turritella Species: †alticostata
  4. Turitella alticostata a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Turitella alticostata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Turritella is a genus of medium-sized sea snails with an operculum, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Turritellidae. They have tightly coiled shells, whose overall shape is basically that of an elongated cone. The name Turritella comes from the Latin word turritus meaning "turreted" or "towered" and the diminutive suffix -ella. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Sorbeoconcha Family: Turritellidae Genus: Turritella Species: †alticostata
  5. Plicatula marginata 1a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Plicatula marginata Bivalve SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: The Plicatulidae are a family of saltwater clams, marine bivalve mollusks, known commonly as kitten's paws or kittenpaws.[1] These bivalves are related to oysters and scallops. The family is monotypic, having a single genus, with seven species. Plicatulidae are small, with weakly convex shells which are irregularly oval or even almost triangular. Typically, they attach themselves to a hard surface by the right valve. The ligament is internal and triangular. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Plicatulidae Genus: Plicatula Species: †marginata
  6. Plicatula marginata 1a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Plicatula marginata Bivalve SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: The Plicatulidae are a family of saltwater clams, marine bivalve mollusks, known commonly as kitten's paws or kittenpaws.[1] These bivalves are related to oysters and scallops. The family is monotypic, having a single genus, with seven species. Plicatulidae are small, with weakly convex shells which are irregularly oval or even almost triangular. Typically, they attach themselves to a hard surface by the right valve. The ligament is internal and triangular. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Plicatulidae Genus: Plicatula Species: †marginata
  7. Plicatula marginata 1a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Plicatula marginata Bivalve SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: The Plicatulidae are a family of saltwater clams, marine bivalve mollusks, known commonly as kitten's paws or kittenpaws.[1] These bivalves are related to oysters and scallops. The family is monotypic, having a single genus, with seven species. Plicatulidae are small, with weakly convex shells which are irregularly oval or even almost triangular. Typically, they attach themselves to a hard surface by the right valve. The ligament is internal and triangular. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Plicatulidae Genus: Plicatula Species: †marginata
  8. Plicatula marginata 1a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Plicatula marginata Bivalve SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: The Plicatulidae are a family of saltwater clams, marine bivalve mollusks, known commonly as kitten's paws or kittenpaws.[1] These bivalves are related to oysters and scallops. The family is monotypic, having a single genus, with seven species. Plicatulidae are small, with weakly convex shells which are irregularly oval or even almost triangular. Typically, they attach themselves to a hard surface by the right valve. The ligament is internal and triangular. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Plicatulidae Genus: Plicatula Species: †marginata
  9. Ostrea compressirorostra a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ostrea compressirorostra Bivalve SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Ostrea is a genus of edible oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Ostreidae, the oysters. This genus is very ancient. It is known in the fossil records from the Permian to the Quaternary (age range: from 259 to 0.0 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Ostrea includes about 150 extinct species. Ostrea compressirostra is a species of prehistoric saltwater oyster, a fossil that is found in the Eastern United States. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Ostreidae Genus: †Ostrea Species: †compressirorostra
  10. Ostrea compressirorostra a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ostrea compressirorostra Bivalve SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Ostrea is a genus of edible oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Ostreidae, the oysters. This genus is very ancient. It is known in the fossil records from the Permian to the Quaternary (age range: from 259 to 0.0 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Ostrea includes about 150 extinct species. Ostrea compressirostra is a species of prehistoric saltwater oyster, a fossil that is found in the Eastern United States. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Ostreidae Genus: †Ostrea Species: †compressirorostra
  11. Cyclocardia granulata group a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cyclocardia granulata Bivalve SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: Cyclocardia is a genus of molluscs in the family Carditidae. The related genus Vimentum is sometimes included here. Carditidae is a family of marine bivalve clams of the order Carditoida, which was long included in the Veneroida. They are the type taxon of the superfamily Carditoidea. Delimitation of this family versus the closely related Condylocardiidae is somewhat problematic. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Carditoida Family: Carditidae Genus: Cyclocardia Species: granulata
  12. Cyclocardia granulata group a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cyclocardia granulata Bivalve SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: Cyclocardia is a genus of molluscs in the family Carditidae. The related genus Vimentum is sometimes included here. Carditidae is a family of marine bivalve clams of the order Carditoida, which was long included in the Veneroida. They are the type taxon of the superfamily Carditoidea. Delimitation of this family versus the closely related Condylocardiidae is somewhat problematic. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Carditoida Family: Carditidae Genus: Cyclocardia Species: granulata
  13. Astarte concentrica.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Astarte concentrica Bivalve SITE LOCATION: James City Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Data: Astarte is a genus of bivalve mollusc in the Astartidae family. It was circumscribed by James Sowerby in 1816. As of 2017, WoRMS recognizes approximately 33 species in this genus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Veneroida Family: Astartidae Genus: Astarte Species: concentrica
  14. Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Perciformes Family: Scombridae Genus: Sarda
  15. Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Perciformes Family: Scombridae Genus: Sarda
  16. Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Perciformes Family: Scombridae Genus: Sarda
  17. Ray Stinger Barb fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ray Stinger Barb fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Stingrays are a group of rays, which are cartilaginous fish related to sharks. They are classified in the suborder Myliobatoidei of the order Myliobatiformes and consist of eight families: Hexatrygonidae (sixgill stingray), Plesiobatidae (deepwater stingray), Urolophidae (stingarees), Urotrygonidae (round rays), Dasyatidae (whiptail stingrays), Potamotrygonidae (river stingrays), Gymnuridae (butterfly rays), and Myliobatidae (eagle rays). Most stingrays have one or more barbed stingers (modified from dermal denticles) on the tail, which are used exclusively in self-defense. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Myliobatiformes
  18. Ray Stinger Barb fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ray Stinger Barb fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Stingrays are a group of rays, which are cartilaginous fish related to sharks. They are classified in the suborder Myliobatoidei of the order Myliobatiformes and consist of eight families: Hexatrygonidae (sixgill stingray), Plesiobatidae (deepwater stingray), Urolophidae (stingarees), Urotrygonidae (round rays), Dasyatidae (whiptail stingrays), Potamotrygonidae (river stingrays), Gymnuridae (butterfly rays), and Myliobatidae (eagle rays). Most stingrays have one or more barbed stingers (modified from dermal denticles) on the tail, which are used exclusively in self-defense. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Myliobatiformes
  19. Dolphin Teeth Fossils.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Teeth Fossils SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
  20. Dolphin Inner Ear Bone Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Inner Ear Bone Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
  21. Dolphin Inner Ear Bone Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Inner Ear Bone Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
  22. Fossil Crab Claws a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Crab Claws SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Crabs are decapod crustaceans of the infraorder Brachyura, which typically have a very short projecting "tail" (abdomen), usually entirely hidden under the thorax. They live in all the world's oceans, in fresh water, and on land, are generally covered with a thick exoskeleton and have a single pair of claws. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Euarthropoda Class: Malacostraca Order: Decapoda
  23. Fossil Crab Claws a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Crab Claws SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Crabs are decapod crustaceans of the infraorder Brachyura, which typically have a very short projecting "tail" (abdomen), usually entirely hidden under the thorax. They live in all the world's oceans, in fresh water, and on land, are generally covered with a thick exoskeleton and have a single pair of claws. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Euarthropoda Class: Malacostraca Order: Decapoda
  24. Dolphin Boe Fossils b.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Bone Fossils SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
  25. Dolphin Boe Fossils b.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Bone Fossils SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
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