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Found 5 results

  1. Very odd tyrannosaur tooth?

    Hello Everyone, I have a very strange looking tooth from an area where I sometimes find tyrannosaurid teeth (daspletosaurus from the oldman formation I think). I have posted a lot of angles to try to capture it's oddness. Basically, the shiny side has a weird valley going down lengthwise, near the front carina. The weathered side has a shallow valley running lengthwise closer to the back carina. These features make the tooth appear to have a twist almost like a drill bit when you look at it from the tip down.
  2. Me and my 7 year old boy went looking for fossils many times. We found a claw tip and a claw mid section from two separate expeditions in two different areas within the river valley a kilometer apart. I believe we have a sickle claw tip from one hand of a dromaeosaur and a sickle claw mid section from the opposite hand. I would appreciate any additional id that could be made from these photos.
  3. My June expedition was super fun and interesting to see what I could find. I have lots of unknowns and lots of fossil material that others will be able to help id. Thanks in advance for all those that join the discussion and help me figure out my library of dinosaur fossils.
  4. First dinosaur fossils of the season

    My first day out. Not sure what it all is but looks like tyrannosaur teeth, claws? Horn? Big toe bone and micro toe bone? Croc tooth, small vertibra? I would appreciate if anyone can help out on the ID. Next time I'm going to take a digital tour and post in situ.
  5. Has anybody figured out the exact systematic placement of Stephanosaurus marginatus? As far as I can recall, the holotype of S. marginatus (CMN 419) consists of bones of the forelimb and the foot as well as fragments of neck vertebrae, teeth, and ribs (disassociated bones cataloged under CMN 419 [including a theropod ischium] were provisionally referred to T. marginatus by Lambe 1902, but were later referred to Lambeosaurus by Gilmore 1924). The two editions of the Dinosauria list Stephanosaurus and its type species as a nomen dubium (probably based on the assessment of Stephanosaurus as gen. et. sp. indet. in Brett-Surman's 1989 thesis), but without comment. As pointed out by Gilmore (1924), Stephanosaurus differs from Gryposaurus notabilis only in that the humerus and radius are almost equally proportional to each other in length (ratio of humerus length to radius length in Stephanosaurus 1:0.953 versus 1:0.881 in Gryposaurus notabilis) and the radius and ulna are larger than those of Gryposaurus. Since mid-late Campanian of Montana and Canada is starting to become crowded with saurolophines belonging to different tribes (Brachylophosaurini, Kritosaurini, Saurolophini) and no edmontosaurins have been found in the Dinosaur Park Formation yet, I'd be curious to see if Stephanosaurus could be its own thing or not.
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